#1
So far, my songs have either been entirely based on a riff, or on a chord progression. How can I gel the two better?

Also - I have trouble making the chorus fit with the verses without copying it. For example, a recent song I wrote goes:

Verse:

Line
C
Line
F G

Chorus

Line
C
Line
G F
Line
C
Line
A G


Is it because half of the chorus is the same chords just backwards, or just that they are too different? Or too repetitive?

Thanks
#4
Quote by gabcd86
So far, my songs have either been entirely based on a riff, or on a chord progression. How can I gel the two better?

Also - I have trouble making the chorus fit with the verses without copying it. For example, a recent song I wrote goes:

Verse:

Line
C
Line
F G

Chorus

Line
C
Line
G F
Line
C
Line
A G


Is it because half of the chorus is the same chords just backwards, or just that they are too different? Or too repetitive?

Thanks


It's because you tried to use theory to write your song rather than your ears. Study theory to better understand music, but use your ears/mind/creativity to make your own music.

basically......write something that sounds good to you.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 24, 2009,
#5
I thought that was the problem actually - I just played what fell under my fingers, and it doesn't sound right.
#6
There is absolutely nothing wrong with the use of theory as a compositional aid provided that you have the experience to understand what you like and why you like it. You should immediately begin incorporating every theoretical concept you learn into your compositions so that you understand how to use them and what they sound like. This will gradually eliminate the guesswork involved in getting a composition to sound the way you want it to.

Everyone writes with their "ear". The notion that there is some sort of distinction between writing what you want and writing with theory, or that people who use their theoretical knowledge to compose are completely ignoring what their music sounds like, is ridiculous. Always write want you want, and always be conscious the structure of the music you are creating.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 24, 2009,
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis

Everyone writes with their "ear".

Not true, though it is my opinion that they should.


Quote by Archeo Avis

The notion that there is some sort of distinction between writing what you want and writing with theory, or that people who use their theoretical knowledge to compose are completely ignoring what their music sounds like, is ridiculous. .



There shouldn't be a distinction, but some people do put theoretical considerations before their own judgement......before what their own ears tell them.

I believe it's a problem worth pointing out. It also seems, based on the TS's response, that Ive correctly diagnosed the problem.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 24, 2009,
#8
As people have stated, you seem to be thinking too much and not listening.

Really there are no rules to music... It all depends on what sounds good to you. The "rules" (such as scales, key signatures, etc) are just there as guidelines for things that tend to sound good, so to speak.

If you want to write a riff for a chord progression, sit down and think of what you want your riff to sound like, then try and pick out the notes in your head. Keep doing this and you'll get the hang of it. Playing within scales and playing within the underlying chords is a good template for something that will sound good.
And I mean that in the best possible way.
#9
No, but thats the thing. I didn't do this with theory at all. I was getting ready for a shower, and started air-guitaring, and I thought of the grooviest classic rock riff, and went and recorded it. Now I want to squidge it to that chord progession up by there, and I think I need theory to do so. I don't really want to spend half an hour transposing it, and playing it over all the chords I know, if theory would give me a clue to what would work.

And is there a reason the chord progressions sound bizarre?