#1
I don't know exactly what it is. Does it just have an augmented interval? I remember something about a major third but I don't know exactly. Why is it rarely used in most work with guitar?
#3
An augmented chord is one built by stacking major thirds, which results in a chord with the intervals 1-3-#5. It's not commonly used because it doesn't occur naturally in any diatonic scale, but it can occasionally substitute for a dominant chord, and because its tonality is ambiguous, can be used as a means of modulation.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
It's a major chord with a raised 5th. Like a diminished chord, it's unstable and should be avoided unless you know how to make it harmonize properly.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
An augmented chord is one built by stacking major thirds, which results in a chord with the intervals 1-3-#5. It's not commonly used because it doesn't occur naturally in any diatonic scale, but it can occasionally substitute for a dominant chord, and because its tonality is ambiguous, can be used as a means of modulation.

so would it be right to say it contains the root, major third, and an augmented interval?
#6
Quote by mick13
so would it be right to say it contains the root, major third, and an augmented interval?

Augmented 5th to be exact, but yes.
#7
Quote by pwrmax
Augmented 5th to be exact, but yes.

ohh ok so is it pretty much two major thirds on top of one another? and then it is basically major chord with a raised fifth, like you said as the augmented 5th interval?
#8
some of this is from a recent post in another thread but it's been changed to suit your question

An Augmented chord is one of the four basic triads.

It is constructed by stacking two Major 3rds on top of each other. This results in a Root Major Third and Augmented Fifth intervals

If you look you will see a Major third is a distance of four semitones. This means that the 12 semitone range we use in Western Music is split evenly when we stack Major Thirds.

We start on any note and go up a major third to the major third. Then up from there a major third to the Augmented fifth. If we go up from the augmented fifth to the root again we have another major third interval.

As a result there are only four unique augmented chords. The rest are just inversions of one of the four. For example if we C+ = C E G#. E+ = E G# B# (B# is enharmonic with C hence the chords will sound pretty much the same).

[B]Augmented Chord (Triad)[/B] (breaks octave into three equal steps)
| [B]C[/B]  | C# | D  | D# | [B]E[/B]  | F  | F# | G  | [B]G#[/B] | A  | A# | B  | [B]C[/B]  |
  [B]1                   3                   #5                  8[/B]     
  ↑____Major 3rd______↑____Major 3rd______↑____Major 3rd______↑ 

You can start on any of the three notes and you get the same three notes 
making up the same chord each time.


Here are the FOUR distinct augmented chords. What you call them usually depends on what note you use as the bass note.

  • C+, E+, and G#+ All use the same three notes
  • Db+, F+, and A+ All use the same three notes
  • D+, F#+, A#+ All use the same four notes
  • Eb+, G+, B+ All use the same four notes


Augmented seventh chords: Obviously we can't stack another major third on the Augmented triad since it just takes us back to the root note.

We can stack a minor third on top of that augmented fifth though and get an Augmented Major 7 = 1 3 #5 7.

We only get one naturally occurring Augmented 7th chord from stacking thirds Augmented Major 7. Whereas all the other triads yield two 7th chords from stacking either a major or minor third on them.

Of course we can simply add a minor 7th to an Augmented chord 1 3 #5 b7. To get an Augmented 7th. Technically this is more of an altered dominant 7 (dom7#5) chord but technicalities aren't important. Sometimes the augmented triad on it's own is considered an altered chord namely. There's not hard and fast rules here. As long as what you're saying gets the right message across all that's important is what it sounds like. Have a play around and see what you like.

best of luck.
Si
#9
in an only semi-related note, this is a pretty cool chord that uses an augmented triad in it:

e x
B 7
G 8
D 9
A 10
E 0

It is the chord following the little melody when you die in goldeneye on the 64, next time you are playing, break out our guitar and see what im talking about

And ambiguous sounding is right, I remember one guy called it the "question mark chord", which is a pretty accurate description.
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#10
Quote by sacamano79
in an only semi-related note, this is a pretty cool chord that uses an augmented triad in it:

e x
B 7
G 8
D 9
A 10
E 0

It is the chord following the little melody when you die in goldeneye on the 64, next time you are playing, break out our guitar and see what im talking about

And ambiguous sounding is right, I remember one guy called it the "question mark chord", which is a pretty accurate description.


Funny, I think I was 10 or 11 when I played that game and I have no idea what melody sounds like but I can remember that chord.