#1
I watched half of Melodic Control, but I still have trouble using chord tones. I think it might be because I still have to think about the notes, and then find them, meaning that my solos end up clunky if I try.

Are there any shortcuts, or should I just learn the fretboard, intervals, and chords better?
#3
learn the shortcuts

Its really easy to find the 2nd, 4th, 5th, and octave

its hard to really explain over the net but sit there for a bit and work out where the shortcuts are, and also learn the fretboard
#4
Octave is two strings up and two across, fifth is one string up and two across... erm 4th is when you play adjacent strings in unison... second?
#5
Learn the fretboard and intervals. And intervals on the fretboard, of course.
#6
What you should really take away from melodic control is put a LOT of practicing into arpeggios. Basically, you can start with major and minor triads. There's lots of ways of practicing these stand alone. Then, you can practice them in the context of diatonic scales (3 major and 3 minor triads).

If you reach the point where you can play and find those notes anywhere on the neck in your sleep, you will already have some invaluable soloing skills. Then you can work on diminished triads and other extensions and alterations of the base triads.
#7
Quote by gabcd86
I watched half of Melodic Control, but I still have trouble using chord tones. I think it might be because I still have to think about the notes, and then find them, meaning that my solos end up clunky if I try.



i have the same problem at the moment although i know a fair amount of theory but it can get a bit complected when your appegiating all over the fret board. i really the best way to do it is to learn all the notes on the fret board
you are what you is
#8
Something i used to do is instead of worrying about arpeggios over the whole fret board, was to spend a few days just in one position...say frets 5-9, and really get those arpeggios down, then move on to another section of the neck. Everyone at some point goes through the problem you're having, and it takes a lot of practice. Like I said I'd suggest breaking the neck up into certain sections so it doesnt seem like such a huge task, and go from there. and yeah start with just the major and minor triads and relate them to the scales
#9
Quote by mergapoot
i really the best way to do it is to learn all the notes on the fret board


Well, it's A way to do it and I think a farily slow and tedious one. But, apparently, YMMV.

Triads have a few basic simple patterns that can be organized in a very straightforward way. It would take hardly any time at all to memorize and much quicker to begin actually using with some practice.