#1
Hey all,
I'm intending on designing and constructing a guitar from Australian Timber, except i have no idea what particular Australian timber i should use. I've heard of this "Tap Tone Test" which helps you determine the acoustic properties of the wood to see if it is suitable to be used in a guitar. However i've got no idea how to perform this test. I would like to know,

How do you do a tap tone test?
What size of wood do you do it on?
What do you look/listen for?

Surely it is more complicated than just tapping your knuckle against a piece of wood?

Any help would be greatly appreciated
#2
tap it and listen to see if it resonates. You will have to make sure that the wood is strong enough also, You may wanna use, QLD Maple for the neck, Tasmanian Oak for the body and some other sort of wood for the fretboard, unless you wanna make a block neck (neck adn fretboard are the same piece of wood and the truss rod is routed from the back)
#3
Quote by simbrose
Hey all,
I'm intending on designing and constructing a guitar from Australian Timber, except i have no idea what particular Australian timber i should use. I've heard of this "Tap Tone Test" which helps you determine the acoustic properties of the wood to see if it is suitable to be used in a guitar. However i've got no idea how to perform this test. I would like to know,

How do you do a tap tone test?
What size of wood do you do it on?
What do you look/listen for?

Surely it is more complicated than just tapping your knuckle against a piece of wood?

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Not much more, you would probably want to hold it by the end so it's off the floor. You listen to the sound to see how it resonates as and you do this to different pieces of wood some will sound dead and just a dud while others will sound very resonate and alive.
#7
Unless you are building multiple guitars and can compare the results of the finished instruments, tap testing is virtually useless.

ANYTHING you tap, will produce a sound. I remember once a guy telling me that Jarrah was fine for guitars, because when he hit the plank with a MALLET, it 'resonated a bit'. The location of your hands, how it's held, and when you tap it, all effects how the timber responds.

Furthermore, as soon as you change the size of the piece of wood (cut it to shape, thin it down, etc) the pitch of the "tap" changes... so what is it you are looking for? Just use a known guitar wood, and be happy with it. If you are going to build 100 guitars, then start testing... otherwise you'll just be playing solid wood bongos...

QLD = Queensland

Regards,
Perry Ormsby

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