#1
I'm looking for some tips on a quite easy-to-play baroque piano piece (think not much harder than Für Elises faster parts for max difficulty level). Our culture history teacher wanted us to showcase different styles from the renaissance and baroque periods.

I was thinking something along the lines of J.S. Bachs piano pieces, but I'm not sure if those are very representative of baroque music? I hate how undetailed most culture historic litterature is when it comes to music (opposed to architecture and art, which tend to be quite detailed).

Anyway, any help is much appreciated!
#2
there's a few easy baroque pieces by J.S Bach, like Gavotte I and II from his 3rd english suite, Allemande and Gavotte from his 5th French Suite and of course all the classics he wrote (such as jesu joy, well tempered clavier, minuet in g etc) but i think the other pieces are more "representative" of baroque.
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#3
moonlight sonata

its cheesy, but it works
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#4
Bach is very representative of the baroque period (1600-1750 more or less).

Moonlight sonata is nice but that's late classical, not baroque music.
#5
Have you seen some of Scarlatti's work? He was one of the major baroque composers. I've played his Sonata in D (i think it was that), it was harder than fur elise, but you might want to give that or some of his other work a look too.
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#6
Quote by -efx-
Bach is very representative of the baroque period (1600-1750 more or less).

Moonlight sonata is nice but that's late classical, not baroque music.

Thank you

Sonata for Harpsichord in B flat major, K 551/L 396 by Domenico Scarlatti
Little Fugue in G minor, BWV 578 by Johann Sebastian Bach
English Suties: 5th suite in e minor, BWV 810 by Johann Sebastian Bach

But no joke your not going to get a easy paino piece from the Baroque period. The Baroque period was known for its heavy use of polyphony, counterpoint and modulation.
#7
Hadn't heard the "little" fugue earlier actually, I'd learn it if I had more time! Might pick it up later though.

@bfun

Thanks for the tips, I'll look up the Gavottes, Allemande and Scarlatti. I realised I could play Minuet in G by Bach and Jesu Joy ~, so those are my back-ups.


and roger EFX, I was a bit unsure of wether his piano/cemballo/claviature works were, thanks!


EDIT:

just a quick question, Bachs no1 Preludium in C wouldn't be the best choice, right? Just checking, 'cause I prefer that taste-wise over the minuet and jesu, but I guess with the lack of polyphony etc it wouldn't be the best if you wanted to showcase baroque?
Last edited by descara at Feb 25, 2009,
#8
Toccata in D by Bach, its a bunch of legato

But in the baroque period it was mostly harpsichord/clavichord/organ

FYI

Please use tags for tabs....
#9
Yeah, the closest thing to the piano in the baroque age was probably the clavichord followed by the harpiscord (only in that order due to the harpsicord being a plucked instrument as opposed to the clavicord or piano)

Fun topic though, I love this stuff
#10
Quote by Camdon
Toccata in D by Bach, its a bunch of legato

But in the baroque period it was mostly harpsichord/clavichord/organ

FYI

That might be because the piano wasn't invented until the 18th century.
#11
ust a quick question, Bachs no1 Preludium in C wouldn't be the best choice, right? Just checking, 'cause I prefer that taste-wise over the minuet and jesu, but I guess with the lack of polyphony etc it wouldn't be the best if you wanted to showcase baroque?


It's a fine example of baroque music. Not all baroque music was heavily polyphonic. Anyways if you really want to showcase baroque music you should play a complete prelude and fugue from the WTC (we don't call it the 'old testament' for nothing!), but if that's too hard, and you insist on using music that is polyphonic, the inventions and sinfonias by bach are considerably easier and have a fugal way about them as well.
#12
Quote by descara
I'm looking for some tips on a quite easy-to-play baroque piano piece (think not much harder than Für Elises faster parts for max difficulty level). Our culture history teacher wanted us to showcase different styles from the renaissance and baroque periods. I was thinking something along the lines of J.S. Bach's piano pieces, but I'm not sure if those are very representative of baroque music?
For all practical purposes J.S. Bach's output defines the Baroque period. In fact, music historians mark the end of the period with Bach's death in 1750, even though the baroque style had passed pretty far out of favor several years earlier.
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#13
Quote by EZLN libertad
moonlight sonata. its cheesy, but it works
Beethoven's piano sonata opus 27 #2 in C# minor, the so-called "Moonlight Sonata", is not an example of a baroque composition. Bach was the last of the true Baroque composers, and he died 20 years before Beethoven was born. The "Moonlight" is, however, an excellent example of music's Romantic period.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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