#1
What's up guys.

I have a quick question regarding half-stack placement in a room.

I picked up a Fender Metalhead half-stack (Pretty decent amp .. I would never pay list price for it, but I picked it up off of Craigslist for a third of the price!)

When I tested it at the guys house, it was in the living room with a lot of free open space around it. It got really loud on a low setting. Sounded nice.

Now lets go to my practice room. The room is SMALL! We have a little PA system, my half-stack, the bass and combo amp and a drum set. My amp sits against the corner of the back wall so it only has a little bit of breathing room in the back. Wedged in between the wall and the closet door it has no space on the sides and the drumset is only a couple of feet away from the front. The amp does not get nearly as loud as it did when it was in an open space. Also, my house is crap and in the ghetto with a weak powerbox that we usually have to reset a couple of times a month.

My questions are:

#1 Is there a possibility that I'm not getting enough power to this amp?

#2 Due to the room size, can that be keeping my amp from fully amplyfing the sound? I am completely unfamiliar with room dynamics.

Any advice or ideas (my idea is getting a real practice room or giving up my master bedroom..lady prolly wont let that happen ;-) )

I'm just interested why it sounded louder at the sellers house and not mine. I guess I can try putting it in my living room and see what happens?

Thanks for anything in advance and later guys. Stay Grindin!!!
#2
when i practice at my drummer's house, where he have the whole basement, i get my amp up to about 1/3 of the total volume. when i jam with my brother in our guest room, where i'm basically sitting on his drum set, i barely get the volume over 1. room dynamics do have something to do with it, but amps will always sound better on stage!
#3
Surprisingly...the smaller the room, the louder you need the amp.

In larger rooms you get a lot more loudness from the sound bouncing around all of the walls, floor and ceiling, which adds to your overall sound. In a small room the sound is going out of the amp and bounce back to you very quickly. You will have to cut up the volume to overpower your own sound, and to compete with others playing along.

Wearing earplugs will kill a ton of the overtones you get in smaller rooms, not to mention they save your ears.

Make sure your amp isn't sitting on the floor. Getting the cab a few inches off of the ground will really liven it up.
Major of 7 String Legion 7 > 6

Carvin DC747
Ibanez RG2228
Schecter Avenger Custom Shop
and my baby....
Gibson Explorer Studio
#4
Alright, thanks for the advice guys

I don't know if the correct term is "casters", but I have those on the bottom of the cab with the wheels so maybe 2-3 inches off the ground. Should I put it any higher than that?

I figured the smaller the room the louder you need the amp. I have a very very very heavy handed drummer so that's why I grabbed a half stack..so I can hear my guitar with the drums ( that and getting a half-stack has been a dream since I was 15 and now the new dream is a full stack!)

I understand that regardless I will still have to hook up to a PA for gigs. But right now the vocalist uses the PA and I'm rockin some old school Peavey speakers and a Rogue power mixer or something like that.

""**You will have to cut up the volume to overpower your own sound, and to compete with others playing along. **""

What do you mean by cut up the volume?

Hey, thanks again guys. Appreciate the feedback.
#5
Quote by MESAexplorer
Surprisingly...the smaller the room, the louder you need the amp.

In larger rooms you get a lot more loudness from the sound bouncing around all of the walls, floor and ceiling, which adds to your overall sound. In a small room the sound is going out of the amp and bounce back to you very quickly. You will have to cut up the volume to overpower your own sound, and to compete with others playing along.

Wearing earplugs will kill a ton of the overtones you get in smaller rooms, not to mention they save your ears.

Make sure your amp isn't sitting on the floor. Getting the cab a few inches off of the ground will really liven it up.


+1

Noticed that a few weeks ago when I moved my rig out of the spare bedroom into a huge walk in closet I have. To get to the same sound level I was at before I have to crank her up a bit higher now.

And a side note it helped me get fizzy stage and the acoustics of the room sound so so much better now. So it was a plus for me...
#6
Quote by MetalHead916
Alright, thanks for the advice guys

I don't know if the correct term is "casters", but I have those on the bottom of the cab with the wheels so maybe 2-3 inches off the ground. Should I put it any higher than that?

I figured the smaller the room the louder you need the amp. I have a very very very heavy handed drummer so that's why I grabbed a half stack..so I can hear my guitar with the drums ( that and getting a half-stack has been a dream since I was 15 and now the new dream is a full stack!)

""**You will have to cut up the volume to overpower your own sound, and to compete with others playing along. **""

What do you mean by cut up the volume?

Hey, thanks again guys. Appreciate the feedback.


Casters should suffice on a hard surface. If you're on carpet you might want to raise it up a little more.

Instead of a full stack I would focus on getting a 2x12 and your 4x12 and use you're 2x12 as monitors. It's much more feasible to set your 2x12 at an angle, or on a chair to help you hear yourself better than a 4x12.

When you get sound bouncing off of walls (hard dense surfaces) or non carpeted floors you're getting the highs in a much more present dose.

The guitar tone is roughly broken down into this:
Highs: the texture of your sound
Mids: the tone of your sound
Lows: the depth and thickness of your sound.

Knowing that, you want mids to cut through over the lows and highs so you can hear the guitar tone. When you get the highs bouncing around, and being the most present sound you feel like you need to cut the guitar up higher to cut through your white noise from all the reverb.

Hope this helps.
Major of 7 String Legion 7 > 6

Carvin DC747
Ibanez RG2228
Schecter Avenger Custom Shop
and my baby....
Gibson Explorer Studio
#7
Quote by IbanezPsycho
+1

Noticed that a few weeks ago when I moved my rig out of the spare bedroom into a huge walk in closet I have. To get to the same sound level I was at before I have to crank her up a bit higher now.

And a side note it helped me get fizzy stage and the acoustics of the room sound so so much better now. So it was a plus for me...


It's back in the closet?!
...
#8
Quote by bartdevil_metal
It's back in the closet?!


Yup ....
But its a much bigger closet
All of my gear only takes up about a 1/3rd of the space.

I've been eyeballin the room for a while now and I finally talked my wife into letting me use it as a my recording studio.
Last edited by IbanezPsycho at Feb 25, 2009,
#9
Okay, I'm on carpet so I'll probably just use a small table to set it on.

Ahhh I didn't think about using my 2x12 combo amp for monitors..I have one that I can try out tonight...good idea!

MESAexplorer ... Thank you very much for clearing the air on this subject for me. Especially when it comes to the Highs, Mids, Lows. I used to just turn the gain all the way up...no mids..all highs and lows..but now I'm actually into creating a somewhat decent tone and this should get me started and give me a better idea of how to obtain the tone I want.

Thanks again guys..very very helpful people on this forum.
#10
By 2x12 combo I hope you mean just using the speaker input of your combo as a monitor. You can't run the output from your MH500 into your FM212 without something blowing up.
Major of 7 String Legion 7 > 6

Carvin DC747
Ibanez RG2228
Schecter Avenger Custom Shop
and my baby....
Gibson Explorer Studio
#11
No No No...definitely wasn't going to do that. I don't hook my MH500 to anything at the moment. If needed (which it will soon), I will mic to the PA Mixer or use the line out feature on the back of the head to hook into the mixer.

So would I use the speaker input to connect to an input on the mixer? I just don't think I have the right inputs for it.

The combo amp is a Fender Frontman 212R. The mixer is a rogue PRM-806 I believe.

The amp has a Pwr In and Pre Out jacks. and of course the guitar input jacks

The mixer has no kind of jacks for this. It just has an effects in/out . A recording jack on the front and the two speaker jacks in the back to connect the external speakers.

Where would I hook up? From the preout of the amp into one of the back speaker jacks on the mixer?