#1
After jamming with my guitar teacher I realized I haven't worked much on rhythm, at all, except some blues. Other than that he showed me this slow blues prog. that I had frustrating difficulty trying to get it down. Any practice you'd suggest? Any songs? I realized all I've been doing lately was dicking around and shredding.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#2
Work on songs with barre chords/open chords and simple strumming patterns at first and work your way to more difficult ones. Check out State Radio and Dispatch. They usually have simple (often reggae) strumming patterns.

Dicking around is ok, but I suggest taking it easy on the shredding until you are proficient at playing simpler stuff.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Feb 25, 2009,
#3
im sure if you're having trouble getting basic rhythm then your probably not much of a shredder.
#4
Quote by md41
After jamming with my guitar teacher I realized I haven't worked much on rhythm, at all, except some blues. Other than that he showed me this slow blues prog. that I had frustrating difficulty trying to get it down. Any practice you'd suggest? Any songs? I realized all I've been doing lately was dicking around and shredding.



work on songs, learn rhythm guitar parts. problem solved.

By the way your problem is fairly common. People often get so caught up in trying to get fast, that they forget about things like playing rhythm guitar. it's a symptom of SGS (sports guitar syndrome), a common ailment amongst a guitarists today. Unfortunately it's so widespread now that most guitarists are at least somewhat affected by it. the best way to treat it, is to simply stop treating the guitar like a sport, and start playing music on it. In your case, spend some time playing rhythm guitar.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 25, 2009,
#5
all you have to do if find a song with a good range of chords ... pinball wizard/ wonderwall/ jumper

set a metronome to a slower bpm and play your way through the song staying on beat know the song then work on how fast the song is actually played
#6
i dont know exactly what kind of music you play but...
a lot of metallica songs have good progressions and have a lot of mute-picking-to-open- picking that will help. ummm some ska will target backbeats and get u to take advantage of alternate picking and targeting notes. open chord progressions will help u with different picking patterns. for some complex stuff for later on, try Dream Theater and some mathcore bands because they involve a lot of tme signature changes which will definitley help ur counting and feel of the music.

p.s. mathcore is called that because of the signature changes, not because it deals with math topics lol. its good stuff.
#7
Quote by md41
Other than that he showed me this slow blues prog. that I had frustrating difficulty trying to get it down.


Yeah, rhythm (I assume your problem is rhythm in general, not just rhythm guitar) is something everyone thinks is easy -- until you have to do something in time. Then you realize how woefully inadequate playing in your fantasy land is.

You absolutely do not need to practice complex songs. I'd suggest, whenever you pratice turn on your metronome/drum machine. Practice/play EVERYTHING with it on. ALWAYS.
#8
People are much more impressed by a beautiful rhythm than shredding at any bpm. I've met many a guitarist who claim to be awesome at guitar, but they don't know the first thing about playing rhythm.
I'd definitely recommend The Red Hot Chili Peppers. They have a healthy balance of rhythm and lead in the majority of their songs.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#9
I think the best thing you can do for your rhythm is playing with other people, especially a drummer. My school jazz band helped me tremendously.
#10
Definately spend more time with the metronome. Or, use a drum machine if you can.
There's a great book called "Rhythm Guitar the Complete Guide". As the Title suggests, it's very thorough. It starts really basic, and gradually gets into very advanced stuff. It was written by a staff member of MI, (GIT). I use it with several of my students and have had a lot of success with it.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#11
I actually was about to post on this too - I notice I have a problem keeping time when playing rhythm unless I'm playing something really simple. if I can't visualize the notes I'm playing then I can't count my measures effectively :\

Any advice?