#1
I have heard that chords such as C/F is a C chord with an F as the bass note. Would it sound wrong if I just played a C chord seeing how the bass plays an F anyway? Jazz band instructor said to just use the sheet as a guide and do whatever I want... Couldn't find this is any search so sorry if it's somewhere else.
#2
If all the notes are present, across any of the instruments, then it will sound close. Lots of guitarists let the bass take parts they don't want so the can focus on other things.
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#3
Quote by nate763
I have heard that chords such as C/F is a C chord with an F as the bass note. Would it sound wrong if I just played a C chord seeing how the bass plays an F anyway? Jazz band instructor said to just use the sheet as a guide and do whatever I want... Couldn't find this is any search so sorry if it's somewhere else.


Yup, you could just play a C in that case. The bass player will be playing the F anyway.

btw is that really a chord from your chart? Somehow I doubt it as that is not a typical chord. (and actually the 11th is generally avoided in Major chords because it clashes with the 3rd)
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 25, 2009,
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
There's no F note in a C major chord...



No there isn't.

Assuming that was an actual chord in his chart (which it probably wasn't), you could just play the C. Chances are though he saw something else and just remembered it wrong.

The principle is the same though. Slash chord..... you can just play the chord.
#6
That isn't always true. What if the bass is playing C and the point of having the guitar play F/C was to get the 4th down low?

I'm guessing he meant C/G, though, in which case the 5th down low is not that important.
#7
No I just made something up I had something like Ab/F or something like that. Don't remember seeing how I just looked at the music for about 5 minutes for the first time today. Anyway thanks for the help.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That isn't always true. What if the bass is playing C and the point of having the guitar play F/C was to get the 4th down low?
.


It is typically true for the typical situation.

If you were playing solo guitar, or maybe a duet, then it would likely have to represent that alt bass note, but in a jazz band? Its typically covered. You certainly could play the note though (and it would be good for you to learn), but chances are the band director won't know the difference anyway.

Quote by nate763
No I just made something up I had something like Ab/F or something like that.


LOL.

You can get away with the main chord if you need to in order to get through the chart. Those jazz band charts can be pretty difficult. Ultimately learning the chord with the alt bass note would be good.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 25, 2009,
#9
^^ it doesn't matter, the bass plays the F in Jazz situation, you play a regular C.

It is just posted as chord, so you know which scales you can use, cause it really is a totally different chord.

Imagine you wanting to play C Lydian lick over that chord in ur improv, if it doesn't state ther's an F in the bass, whether u play it or not, your lydian would sound off, because of the F#, while on a normal C chord it can work.

Now this chord would complement a F Lydian lick.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 26, 2009,