#2
yes. but diminished 4th and augmented 5th aren't terms that are commonly used. think of this as F#=Gb if that helps
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#3
Yes, those would be correct equivalents. You really just need to remember that there is no such thing as a minor 4 or a minor 5, its either augmented or diminished. Also, the diminished 5 or augmented 4 is known as the tritone.
#4
Technically they are the same notes, but it's all about naming. You wouldn't have a minor 3rd and a major 3rd in one chord, that just doesn't make sense. You'd have a minor 3rd and a diminished 4th.
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#5
a minor 6th would also include a perfect 5th, whereas an augmented 5th would not
similar for diminished 4th - it could also include a minor 3rd, whereas you can't put a major and minor 3rd in the same chord (e.g. hendrix chord is a N7#9 not a N7minor/major)
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#6
a diminished four would be very rare and 90% of the time you would call it major 3rd. but yes your reasoning is correct.
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Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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#7
If you look at 12-edo schismatically by proceeding in fourths, all major thirds are really diminished fourths...

C F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb Fb
#8
Quote by food1010
Technically they are the same notes, but it's all about naming. You wouldn't have a minor 3rd and a major 3rd in one chord, that just doesn't make sense. You'd have a minor 3rd and a diminished 4th.


Actually, you'd have a major third and an augmented second. The major third is vastly more stable than its equivalent minor, and will always establish itself as the determinant of tonality.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by mick13
minor 6th = aug 5th?
diminished 4th = major 3rd?


To give an interval it's name, i.e 3rd, 7th, 2nd etc, you count the letters between, the root and the destination letter. The root counts as 1.

To find the quality of the interval, i.e maj, min, dim, aug, you count the semitones between the root and the destination letter.

C to A will be a major 6th.
C to Ab will be a minor 6th.

C to G will be a perfect fifth.
C to G# will be a augmented 5th.

A to D - Perfect 4th
A to Db - Diminished 4th

A to C# - Major 3rd
Last edited by mdc at Feb 26, 2009,
#10
Quote by mick13
minor 6th = aug 5th?
diminished 4th = major 3rd?
It all comes down to how it appears in the written score. I sort of feel sorry for those guitarists who know nothing but tab. Issues like Mick has raised here consistently bewilder those folks.
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