#1
Ok, so basically I got tired of my Omen 7 cutting out every time the cable jiggled in the socket, so I decided to unscrew the cover and try to mess with it...
I'm still not sure exactly what I hoped to accomplish, or probably more accurately, HOW I hoped to accomplish it... but needless to say I got more and more frustrated as effort was met with failure and now I have a guitar with the soldered input jack wire severed...
I know I'm stupid... I don't need the damn internet to tell me that...
So if anyone could direct me to the quickest route to getting back into the land of distortion I would try not to be in such a bad mood next time something goes wrong.
I can have it in at the local guitar center tomorrow at their earliest operating hours, but I'm not sure if they repair this kind of thing.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but things look like they can be soldered back together... unless that just doesn't work. Although, on second thought, since a vast amount of Omen's have problems with the jack being loose and such, I would prefer to just replace the damn thing altogether, and never have to put up with my few and far between moments of musical creativity and innovation being stomped by hardware problems.
I don't think I have the tools or the skills to solder a replacement part myself, so I would probably be looking at some place (Guitar Center?) for that as well...
#2
Soldering irons are about $8 at radioshack. The solder I got was $5. Don't tell me you don't have the money when you'd otherwise go to a guitar store to have it repair for $50 :P. It's really simple. I've been wanted a soldering iron since about age 14 (3 years ago) and only got one recently. In the first few days I've had it I've fixed my amp, two laptops, and rewired my stratocaster (slightly modded it rather.)

So go to RadioShack. Get a soldering iron. Don't burn your house down. And solder in a well ventilated area. Solder generally contains lead.
#3
dude.....your stupid.

lol. jk. guitar center should do something about it. well mine would, but i dunno about yours. it can just be soldered back up then just tighten it. also, if you loop the cable through the strap, it moves less, meaning it wont cut out nearly as much
#4
Quote by tjfishrocker
dude.....your stupid.

lol. jk. guitar center should do something about it. well mine would, but i dunno about yours. it can just be soldered back up then just tighten it. also, if you loop the cable through the strap, it moves less, meaning it wont cut out nearly as much

He was comfortable enough taking it apart. I think he'd benefit more from fixing it himself.
#5
If you dont want to solder, use electrical tape. It may be a terrible thing to do, but it's very cheap, and most people have it in their house.
..I was watching my death.
#6
Quote by timbit2006
If you dont want to solder, use electrical tape. It may be a terrible thing to do, but it's very cheap, and most people have it in their house.

That's a great alternative, I think. Safer. Less toxic brain cells mine killed. Less technical.

How old are you?
#7
How old are you?

Was that directed to me? Or the other guy?
If it's me, I'm 14(Oh, how badly I wanna be 18)
..I was watching my death.
#8
The melting (or more correctly vaporization) point of lead is hotter than a soldering iron can get. The smoke is just resin burning up. It isn't gonna make you retarded.

Electrical tape is a terrible alternative to solder.
#9
He's 17
Quote by MooshMooshMarc

Hi 5 man! this is what Im talkin bout!


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Chain for a strap
#10
Ok, thanks for the advice... I'll look into acquiring a soldering iron and maybe investigate the tape response as well.
So I should just attempt to reattach the wire to the jack via solder if possible and try to get things screwed in tight and secure, once and for all?
I'm still not sure exactly why the cut-out was happening in the first place... was it because the wire was getting loose? Or just crappy manufacturing of the jack parts? After I took it out and rearranged the parts on it time and time again, I could occasionally get sound to come from the guitar, but I had to hold the cable in a certain way and it still sounded muffled...

I think I'm going to get a replacement part today, to avoid all future troubles, since I believe the original malfunction was with the input jack.
I know a guitar mod junky who lives down the street from me... I would be astounded if he couldn't solder something, even if he puts a price to it...
Hopefully I'm back up and shattering glass within a day or two...
Until then, I think I might try to channel my energies and write lyrics instead of sulking and getting all depressed and **** like I was when I first posted this...
Last edited by IROn 5L1nKY at Feb 26, 2009,
#12
Yes... I figure as much now... I spent several hours yesterday watching my father as he instructed me on a few things, and then practiced soldering and trimming wires with knives and such... and then I tried 2 times to resolder the wire to the old jack... and both times (that I soldered it to the correct ?prong?) I got the same results: A LOT of LOUD BUZZING... when I placed my hand on the jack cover, that subsided somewhat, but I still wasn't getting any guitar to come out of the amp, although with some wiggling I could occasionaly get a weak tone to resonate.
So onto the new jack:
Some things I would really like to know before I go home and destroy something by accident:
This is a generic guitar input jack from All Parts (texas company) and it has two of the prongs that interface with the 1/4 inch cable, and then three of the smaller prongs with holes, layered on different levels of the orange plates (what are those?)... my old jack had only one interface arm and two prongs... only one of which WAS being used, but there was evidence of former soldering on both.
There's ever only been one wire soldered on my guitar since I came into possession of it. But there seems to be a second wire tucked into the insulation of the first, kinda. Is that the grounding wire? and is it imporant to have connected since I've never had it so, but have always had a working guitar?
Finally, which prong do I need to solder my guitar's hot output wire to, on the new jack, that is?
I am going to look up a wiring diagram when I get home, but it sounds like you guys have already messed with this sort of thing, and so I thought one of you might know.

Also... I am much happier now... just because I don't have amplification doesn't mean I can't play... and so now, without any noise except the pitiful buzzing of my strings, I have constructed my first song with lyrics... and I likey... a lot! Maybe when I get amped again, and can record properly, I'll share...!
Last edited by IROn 5L1nKY at Feb 27, 2009,
#13
Quote by Invader Jim
The melting (or more correctly vaporization) point of lead is hotter than a soldering iron can get. The smoke is just resin burning up. It isn't gonna make you retarded.

Electrical tape is a terrible alternative to solder.

Well... wear gloves.
#14
Quote by Invader Jim
The melting (or more correctly vaporization) point of lead is hotter than a soldering iron can get. The smoke is just resin burning up. It isn't gonna make you retarded.

Electrical tape is a terrible alternative to solder.

Yup, that's right. Listening to your wife will make you retarded
#15
Ok, so I took the leap and soldered the wire to the new jack just a few moments ago when I got home...
Good news is... it makes noise...
Bad news is... it's hard to hear the good noise over the sound of angry buzzing...
So, I have a couple things to lay out before you in my final moment of desperate need:
First: the newer jack is a tiny bit bigger than the old one, so none of the washers that I had will fit on it, and it only came with one, so now there's a little bit of the jack with screw grooves and all sticking out.
Second: How EXACTLY are you supposed to solder a wire onto the little prong on the jack? going from the outside putting it through the hole and soldering it to the other side of the prong?
Third: what should the insulation on the wiring be doing?
Fourth: why, when I touch the jack cover, does much of the buzzing stop? (although there's still a lot of audible static...)
Also, the grounding wire is still buried somewhere a little further in the wiring insulation wherever the people who manufactured the guitar stuffed it... so I only have the one hot out wire connected...
Last edited by IROn 5L1nKY at Feb 27, 2009,
#16
1: Ok, so just make the hole bigger and get new nuts (puns not intended).

2: What's to know? Poke the wire into the hole in the lug, apply solder, let cool. Done.

3: Are you serious?

4: Yeah, it's supposed to stop.

Also, the grounding wire is still buried somewhere a little further in the wiring insulation wherever the people who manufactured the guitar stuffed it... so I only have the one hot out wire connected...

5: There's your problem.
#17
thats the bridge ground wire. without it, the grounding fails hard.
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#18
Would tape actually work? cause when I was saying that, I didn't mean it would work...
..I was watching my death.
#19
Quote by timbit2006
Would tape actually work? cause when I was saying that, I didn't mean it would work...
then don't say it in the first place?

tape can be just fine as an insulator. for holding connections together it sucks ass.


*slaps timbit2006 with a trout*
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#20
and that's it guys... thanks for all the actually helpful posts... I soldered on the grounding wire and VOILA... success!
So, my question is.... why was that grounding wire not connected when I purchased the guitar? what made that setup different so that it didn't need that?