#1
I hope you guys can help me out. What's the name of the chord (if it exists) that has the formula 1 - 5 - 6. In this case a C chord with the perfect fith G and the major sixth A.
#4
I dunno if that chord has a formal name, I guess it's just a 2nd inversion major triad with the fourth sharpened a whole tone??
#5
what martindecorum said
TS is a dumbass ------------> dumbass
#7
Quote by Xavit
I hope you guys can help me out. What's the name of the chord (if it exists) that has the formula 1 - 5 - 6. In this case a C chord with the perfect fith G and the major sixth A.


C6 (no 3rd)

It's basically a major 6th interval (1 - 6) with a perfect 5th thrown in.

In music(theory) the perfect 5th adds nothing of considerable harmonic usefulness to the harmony unless it's augmented or diminished (5+, 5- or in intervals itself; #5 and b5).

So it could be a C5add6 kind of thing, cause you leave the 3rd out.

A "better" more characteristic C6 chord has the formula: 1 - 3 - (5) - 6.

Where the 3rd interval actually has harmonic purpose; Major or minor, the prime of all Which is either a Major 3rd or a minor 3rd (In intervals: 3 or b3).

I'd go with C6 (no 3rd) (given that it's in the key of C Major), but it's a bit ambiguous.

If it's in the key of C minor, then it's a Cm6 (C minor 6th), then the chord formula is: 1 - b3 - (5) - 6.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 26, 2009,
#9
1st inversion Am7 and C6 are the same I guess it makes sense that this chord would be Am7/C because the 5th is removed but I would call it C5add6 because it is hardly ever implied that C6 is played without the 3rd interval.
Last edited by Kaos_00 at Feb 26, 2009,