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#1
Well here's one we don't see often!

This semester we're making and should be able to complete a classical guitar!

Specs:

-650mm scale
-Spruce top
-Mahoganny back and sides
-Mahoganny neck
-Ebony fretboard and bridge
-Schaller Classical Hauser (16:1) machine heads
-Spanish Heel
-2 1/16" nut width

Will be finished with a French Polish. Should be applying the French Polish next semester. This one will be ready to be closed by mid-May, ready for evalution from teachers.

Neck:



Headstock:







*I should be posting at least once a week, adding new pics every so often!

Feel free to comment or ask measurements!
#5
What kind of wood is your soundboard? and what are you making your sides out of?
and is it just me, or is the bracing perfectly symmetrical on both sides? Because, as far as I know, it's not supposed to be. Maybe steel strings just have a different bracing construction than classicals need.
Cause Mine is completely different. XD
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Gear:
Peavey Supreme 100W head
Crate 4x12 cab
Epiphone Les Paul Standard+
Modded Johnson Stratocaster
#6
spruce top, mahogany sides and back ^

Very nice, Not to often you see an acoustic or classical build on here...
#7
lookin good!

just curious, where did you get that bracing pattern?
#8
Awesome, GB&C needs more acoustics!




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#9
Quote by Emoishboy
What kind of wood is your soundboard? and what are you making your sides out of?
and is it just me, or is the bracing perfectly symmetrical on both sides? Because, as far as I know, it's not supposed to be. Maybe steel strings just have a different bracing construction than classicals need.
Cause Mine is completely different. XD



The bracings are very similar on both sides, but have a small difference which might not show on those pics. The treble-side bracings touch the bottom "V" of the fan bracing, while the bass-side doesn't.

There are tons of possibilities in bracing patterns, all with their own qualities and flaws. Also classical and acoustic guitars dont have the same patterns.

Quote by jimtaka
lookin good!

just curious, where did you get that bracing pattern?


We took it off a plan our teachers made, it's based off a classical guitar our school director made.

All the guitars being built in class are based on his pattern. For the sake of making it simple for us and the teacher to evaluate we took this simple approach, since this is all our first one. Next semester, we'll be building an acoustic, we'll have much more freedom then.
Last edited by velly69 at Feb 27, 2009,
#10
Looks awesome... Never seen a classical build before, best of luck to you!
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#15
Wow, that is amazing. I love how classical guitars sound. I'm excited to see the end of this build!
Gear:
Squier Strat
Cordoba 20TM-CE Acoustic Electric Tenor Uke
Bugera V22
#16
I just subscribed to this, not many acoustic build threads out there. I'm getting close to finished with my first acoustic now, a lot harder to do than I expected. I have a nice piece of flamed maple that is going to be the back and sides for a classical eventually (I'm taking a break from building acoustics for a while after this one).
#17
Thanks for the comments guys, very encouraging to see some interest for this build!

The building part for this guitar will be finished by May. We'll be finishing it be the end of this year. We'll also have an acoustic started and most probably finished by then.

Good luck 420Freak for your acoustic! Are you building/learning on your own?
#18
Quote by velly69
Thanks for the comments guys, very encouraging to see some interest for this build!

The building part for this guitar will be finished by May. We'll be finishing it be the end of this year. We'll also have an acoustic started and most probably finished by then.

Good luck 420Freak for your acoustic! Are you building/learning on your own?

Thanks, I am learning on my own I did tons of research beforehand. I have had lots of woodworking experience before and I have built a bunch of electrics so that helps and my dad's a great woodworker and he can help me if I need it which so far has only been once for setting the neck. I did end up having to start the body over though. Your doing great on this can't wait to see more.
Last edited by 420 FREAK at Mar 9, 2009,
#19
looks beautiful. you obv. know how to make a good guitar
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#21
More pics! Here are some of gluing the neck on the top.

To get a correct fit, the heel was adjusted on a table-mounted router to take off just the right thickness, which is 0.100" for the top. After routing, the heel was slightly sanded and needed to be checked often in order for the fit to be perfect. The neck needs to be in contact with the working surface as well as with the top.








#22
how are you going to bend the sides?
Will you soak it in water then use a steam iron or something then put it in the bracing?
I am always interested in how people do this cause its the only thing i'm worried about before i start planning an acoustic build
#23
epic win!!!
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#24
Quote by guitarcam123
how are you going to bend the sides?
Will you soak it in water then use a steam iron or something then put it in the bracing?
I am always interested in how people do this cause its the only thing i'm worried about before i start planning an acoustic build


There are a few ways you can bend them:

-Some ppl soak the sides in water completely for a few minutes;
-Some bend them in the side-bending mold
-Some bend with the iron

The way we're bending will be with the side bending mold, should hvae a pic of it on page 1. We will be bending them completely dry, adding water if needed during the process. Then retouching on the iron.

It really depends how much experience you have bending, because when soaking them, the wood will have a tendency to warp in the width, then again it will be a lot easier to bend then dry.

If it'll be your first time bending, I suggest spraying water on them lightly and bending with an iron. Start by bending the waist first, checking every few minutes on your plan to make sure you have a regular shape. Make sure not to keep them on one spot too long too, it might burn that way, you should bend with a rocking motion from left to right. Then when the waist is shaped, you can procede by shaping either higher or lower bout.

Also if you have a certain budget, you can look into buying those metal side bending straps. It help greatly spreading the pressure equally. If not, a cheaper alternative would be to use a long peice of sandpaper, not the one on paper, but the one on fabric.
Last edited by velly69 at Mar 12, 2009,
#25
Quote by guitarcam123
how are you going to bend the sides?
Will you soak it in water then use a steam iron or something then put it in the bracing?
I am always interested in how people do this cause its the only thing i'm worried about before i start planning an acoustic build


You probably noticed this in my thread but the way I do it is bend the sides on a length of pipe heated with a propane torch and bend them until it fits into my mold easily and then clamp it in and leave it for a day. It comes out perfect and there is no need for it to fit perfect when you bend it. I was also worried about it before my build and was planning on making jigs to do it but when I tried it this way it was pretty easy and is one of my favorite parts about building the guitar. I also soak mine for about 10 minutes before and spray with water when they dry out.

Looks like this is coming along nicely I will be checking this thread out again when I start my classical build.
#26
looks very nice, especially the headstock
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#27
Haven't posted in a while since it was spring break for us not long ago and we didnt make much progress. Here are a few though. I should be gluing the side in the heel, as well as the kerfed lining by next week. We're currently bending the sides.

We used the side bending mold for 40 minutes at about 300-315'F. The side were slightly wet, this helps alot when bending with the mold.







Here is one side properly placed. We need to bring certain corrections to the sides once they come out of the mold, since there is some spring back to the original form.





#30
Love it! This thread > all the "which pickups" nonsense popping up. I love the way acoustics look in the clamps. This one looks a bit wide in the arse end, no?
#34
My only question is where/what class are you taking to learn the process of creating a guitar. I wonder because my minor is for electrical engineering so that side of things is coming easy to me planning a build, however I dont have much woodworking skill so i would like to know where your taking the class.

tl;dr: Where or what class are you taking to learn to make guitars?
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#35
I'm learning this in school. I'm studying in lutherie in Cegep in Montreal, Canada. Cegep here is the equivalent of College in the US. It's a 3year program, so 6 semesters. The first semester we mostly learn some general woodworking skills. In those years, we get to build a ukulele, which is just to get a hang of the tools. Then one classical for 2 semesters. One acoustic for 1 semester, and the final semester is the final classical.

We also have a few repair classes, for electric acoustic and classicals. A few theory classes as well as a course on the physics of sound, which helps a lot understanding how everything work on a guitar.
#36
This build is just brilliant. I'm kinda like jp58. I'm an Electrical Engineering major. So when someone does something that is as complex as this (wood-working wise) I am very impressed. This obviously takes patience and skills that I don't possess.

Keep up the good work.
#37
you got any pics of the ukulele i was thinking about building a ukulele or a mandolin to get used to the side bending etc of a classical/ acoustic guitar
#39
yeah it would be because of all the odd curves and whatnot.

Theres a place in Australia that sells master grade tasmanian blackwood for ukuleles for $40
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