#1
I have been playing guitar for a while...i know major and minor chords...can even name power chords ....i even know little bit pentatonic scales and major scales....and i have always played songs using tabs

now i am looking to forward to learn some theory ..i dont know how scales are formed....and how chords are formed...

i even dont know C root...

and when i go for some internet lessons it always confuses me.... ...

i want to know where i can start from ?

Sorry for my bad english too
#2
i staqrted off by downloading Guitar Pro files with scale patterns on them. just get a tab with the major scale shapes on them first (also called ionian, but dnt worry about that yet).

Just find tabs, learn the shapes, then worry about the theory. its help to do things that way round.
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#3
I always recomment the crusade columns on this site. Take learning slowly, don't rush or you won't take anything in. If you really struggle with info from the internet, maybe you should think about getting a teacher.
#4
^Everything they said, as well as "If you have any problems start a thread with specific questions and I'll be happy to help.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
The Crusade articles and the link in my sig are quite good. You have to read through the material slowly and make sure you understand every sentence, every phrase, even, before moving on. It is very much like reading math (algebra and such, not high school material).

Of course, you're not on your own when reading the lessons (well, physically, yes). Ask us questions when you get confused, but ask a specific question. If you say, "I don't get it," we'll give you another equally cryptic link; we have lessons on the basics because so many people ask about those concepts and it would be ridiculous to write a 3-post (maxing out each) explanation every time. By asking a specific question, you both analyze what you do understand and what you don't understand as well as giving us a question to answer that isn't vague. Wouldn't it be ridiculous to go to a teacher the day before an exam and say, "I don't get it. Can you teach me the material?" and expect said teacher to give an entire year or semester or lectures in 20 minutes? However, if you say, "Dr. Goldstein, how do you do a limit comparison test on an infinite series?" you will get a much better answer that addresses what it is you don't understand, because you know how to do power series and integrate by parts.

That's too much math for a UG post, but I hope you get the point.
#6
the first thing id do is learn the notes on the guitar. You really only have to learn until the 12th fret and youll know em all after that.

Now that you know the notes on the fretboard, try to see where the different octaves are for each note....(I dont know how much you know, but an octave is the same note played in a higher register. an example are your 1st and 6th strings, both are the note E but one is 2 octaves higher than the other.)

Once you do this youll have a sort of map of your fretboard in your head (it takes time so dont rush it)

now stat learning about how scales work and how to apply them. Also learn the nature of chords and how to form them...

I know it sounds like a lot but just start really slowly and move easily through each step and itll be a piece of cake.
#7
Learning all the notes is a waste of time. You don't play at 18nps thinking, "I'll play Bb next." Your fingers know where the desired sound is because you know the intervals of the fretboard. That is much more important than memorizing 72 note's positions.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Learning all the notes is a waste of time. You don't play at 18nps thinking, "I'll play Bb next." Your fingers know where the desired sound is because you know the intervals of the fretboard. That is much more important than memorizing 72 note's positions.

Is this sarcastic or something?!? (if it is I didn't get it)

What if you wanted to be able to sight read music? Then learning the notes would be a perfectly acceptable thing to do. It's not everyone's goal to play ar 18nps.

And how exactly do you plan on learning the intervals without learning the notes. And even if you devised a system you would still have to learn the equivalent of the 72 notes, you would just be calling them something else.

Surely putting a bit more effore into learning the notes, then learning the intervals between all the 12 notes (which is what, like 12! intervals to memorise?) instead of learning all the intervals on the fretboard relative to every other note (which is what, like 72! intervals to memorise?).
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Learning all the notes is a waste of time. You don't play at 18nps thinking, "I'll play Bb next." Your fingers know where the desired sound is because you know the intervals of the fretboard. That is much more important than memorizing 72 note's positions.


Well yes your are right about that. But you miss the fact that learning an instrument is not only about technique, its about becoming a musician (in most cases at least). What your are describing has a lot more to do with muscle memory than actual knowledge od music, therefore Id place it in the realm of technique.

The TS was asking about music THEORY. If he indeed wants to learn music then yeah, knowing the notes of your instrument would be quite important dont you think?

EDIT: on a side note, part of my point is that he did NOT have to learn all the positions. Its all about understanding the patterns between notes that enable you to find them, not just forcibly memorizing every note. When playing with basic knowledge of notes, the memorization part will come about on its own.
Last edited by rnelson at Feb 27, 2009,
#10
No.

Aside from sight reading, which I'll admit was an oversight but not important to many guitarists (I'm one of them), I do not think it's that important to memorize the entire fretboard. Knowing intervals and a muscle to ear connection are much more important.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No.

Aside from sight reading, which I'll admit was an oversight but not important to many guitarists (I'm one of them), I do not think it's that important to memorize the entire fretboard. Knowing intervals and a muscle to ear connection are much more important.



I agree that reading music is not that important (I started learning it until I realized it was of no practical use to me at the time).

Still, it is important to know the actual theory even of you dont know how to read a staff. When youre playing with other musicians and somebody tells you that theyr'e jamming in the key of C# then you should know what that means and where those notes are in your fretboard. Thats why I strongly advocate that anyone playing an instrument learn the notes of their instrument. Because it just facilitates communication between musicians and makes us learn faster and more efficiently this way..

My idea is start with the basics and everything else will slowly fall into place..
Last edited by rnelson at Feb 27, 2009,
#12
The dots on the side of the neck are an adequate guide in my opinion, and the patterns, which, despite many rants by me about learning music theory rather than guitar theory, are are all that matter are the same in every key, so one can quickly check the dots, find the starting point, and go.

You end up learning the neck well just by playing a lot, but unless you're doing it to be able to play standard notation, it isn't fun or productive.

Edit: I don't want to completely dismiss standard notation. Understanding the staff is a good skill to have and vital in some aspects of guitar playing. However, for the rock and blues and metal that dominate this website, it is of little use to know how to read a staff and immediately know how to play what is written.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 27, 2009,
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The dots on the side of the neck are an adequate guide in my opinion, and the patterns, which, despite many rants by me about learning music theory rather than guitar theory, are are all that matter are the same in every key, so one can quickly check the dots, find the starting point, and go.

You end up learning the neck well just by playing a lot, but unless you're doing it to be able to play standard notation, it isn't fun or productive.

But so much theory is in reference to notes that to be able to apply a lot of theory effectively you are going to need to know the notes.

For example, if someone says x note sounds very dissonant over x chord, how are going to avoid (or play) that note if you are only using patterns?
#14
How long have you been playing and how good are you? It's okay to know that you kick ass.

Anyway, after playing a lot, your fingers simply know where to go for your desired sound.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
How long have you been playing and how good are you? It's okay to know that you kick ass.

Anyway, after playing a lot, your fingers simply know where to go for your desired sound.

But...but you know so much theory. Are you telling me that you don't actually apply any of it?
#16
In my opinion going by the dots is like being able to read words you cant understand. You cant actually learn a lot this way, only exercise your reading skills.

Also reading the staff and learning theory are not even close to the same thing.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No.

Aside from sight reading, which I'll admit was an oversight but not important to many guitarists (I'm one of them), I do not think it's that important to memorize the entire fretboard. Knowing intervals and a muscle to ear connection are much more important.

For me that process of learning the notes was a great help in building those associations. Like you said, you don't constantly think in terms of notes when playing, but it helps to be able to identify them on those occasions when you need to know.
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#18
Quote by steven seagull
For me that process of learning the notes was a great help in building those associations. Like you said, you don't constantly think in terms of notes when playing, but it helps to be able to identify them on those occasions when you need to know.



^this
#19
There's probably links on here to give you the ways to learn scales, but since I'm not doing anything I'll see if I can get you an idea on memorizing scales the way I did in high school.

For major scales, which are the easiest, have a formula which go from whole whole half, whole whole whole, half. A whole step is is two frets, which would be one dot to the next (until the 12th fret...) and half is one fret's distance.

G- 1 sharp which is F
D- 2sharps, which are F and C
A- 3 sharps, which are F,C,G
E- 4 sharps, which are F, C, G, and D
B- 5 sharps, which are F, C, G,D, A
F#- 6 sharps, which are F,C,G,D,A,E
C#- 7 sharps, which are F,C,G,D,A,E,B

I use the acronym Father Can Get Drunk At Every Bar

That's just a little to get you started. I hope it gets you some idea of what you're doing.
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#20
finally someone explained a scale. 3 cheers for joetime! no, im not being sarcastic. hes right, whole whole half, whole whole whole half is exactly what i would guess the TS is looking for. in all honesty, if you want to learn music theory, do it with a piano. its the only instrument that actually makes complete sence (each note is exactly 1 semitone apart. dont say guitar does also, because string changes make it alot more confusing than youd think to a beginner). remember wwhwwwh and then, to apply it to your guitar, find the way of doing it that's most comfortable to you. i personally prefer 3 notes per string, but it really is preference. if worst comes to worst, learn the pattern on one string and then try to make it sound the same using that string plus different ones. is this any help?
you know, ive owned 8 different guitars over my lifetime, and right now i have 3. i wanna know what the hell happened...i mean the picks and cables are understandable, they disappear into thin air all the time, but guitars?