#1
It appears that John Petrucci is playing roughly the notes from a C major scale, over a Dm progression. Could anyone explain the theory behind this?
It's got a great outside jazzy sound.
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#3
He is playing the D Dorian mode. For information on this read the modes sticky and start a thread with any SPECIFIC questions you have, and I'll be happy to help.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
But the chords aren't in dorian?
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Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#5
Do you mean from his dvd?

1 or 2 weeks ago a guy posted Petrucci solo over the fusion/jazz esque backing in his DVD "Rock Dicipline".

That progression was in D minor as well.

Might wanna search for that thread.

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#6
Show us the chords, and show us the notes. One wouldn't play dorian, or any other mode, over a D minor progression.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
I could have sworn i had posted the link, anyways here it is:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88iq-N9yZxs
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
Show us the chords, and show us the notes. One wouldn't play dorian, or any other mode, over a D minor progression.
That depends on whether you consider "playing Dorian" as a feature of the players source of melodic ideas as he's playing or as a feature of an analysis when reflecting on what was played - and even then either case is not clear cut.

One could "play D Dorian" over a D minor progression if he were to consciously use D Dorian as a source for melodic ideas over the D minor progression.

A reflective analysis of the piece might best describe it as being in D minor with a liberal use of the Major sixth in the melody and not as a D Dorian piece regardless of the intentions that form the base of how the player created his melodies.

An alternative analysis of the same piece might describe the Chord Progression as Dm and describe the melodic ideas as Dorian or as having a Dorian flavour or influence. Such a description would not be wrong.

-Haven't seen the link yet this is just hypothetically speaking.
Si
#9
Quote by 7even
I could have sworn i had posted the link, anyways here it is:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88iq-N9yZxs



Like I posted earlier in this thread, there was an exact thread on this "piece".

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1065169

That was also ur thread

Learn about "following the chords" and you need too look up some jazz theory too understand this.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 27, 2009,
#10
One could "play D Dorian" over a D minor progression if he were to consciously use D Dorian as a source for melodic ideas over the D minor progression.


In which case the song would be in D minor with liberal use of the major sixth.

A reflective analysis of the piece might best describe it as being in D minor with a liberal use of the Major sixth in the melody and not as a D Dorian piece regardless of the intentions that form the base of how the player created his melodies.


The intention is irrelevant. "Dorian" describes a property of the music itself. Something is not modal just because you want it to be.

An alternative analysis of the same piece might describe the Chord Progression as Dm and describe the melodic ideas as Dorian or as having a Dorian flavour or influence. Such a description would not be wrong.


"Dorian influence" is not the same as "the song is modal".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
In which case the song would be in D minor with liberal use of the major sixth.


The intention is irrelevant. "Dorian" describes a property of the music itself. Something is not modal just because you want it to be.


"Dorian influence" is not the same as "the song is modal".

How about looking at a post as a whole. I very clearly said it could be analysed as D minor with liberal use of the major sixth. In fact I think those were my exact words. I also said it would be viewed this way regardless of the player's intent.

You're just responding to my post by repeating what was already in my post.

I also never said the song would be modal. I said you could analyse the melodic ideas as modal. In some cases this might be the best analysis, in other cases it might not.

It was never a case of being modal "just because I want it to be".

If you have an established tonic such as D and create melodic ideas using only the notes D E F G A B C then those melodies could be described or analysed as modal (yes even if the chord progression is strictly Dm). One would use such a description or analysis when it would best communicate, describe, or explain what is going on musically or how the musician created the melodies or musical structures in question.

Something is not not modal just because you don't want it to be.

So your statement, "One wouldn't play dorian, or any other mode, over a D minor progression" is false because one can play dorian over a D minor progression and one would do it if that is what one wished to do.
Si