#2
Quote by mick13
Bm - D - A - G

what scales can I use over that


It seems to be in D major. Use the D major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
oh alright then I'm playing B minor so I'm good its relative. when you playing the scale over it do you just pick any notes out of it? do the intervals matter?
#4
D major E dorian F# phrygian G lydian A mixolydian B aeolian (natural minor) C# locrian
#5
Quote by dfinch10
D major E dorian F# phrygian G lydian A mixolydian B aeolian (natural minor) C# locrian


No. That is not how modes work. This progression is not modal at all.

oh alright then I'm playing B minor so I'm good its relative.


You are not playing B minor, you are playing D major. B minor would require a chord progression that suggests B minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 27, 2009,
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
No. That is not how modes work. This progression is not modal at all.


You are not playing B minor, you are playing D major. B minor would require a chord progression that suggests B minor.

wow how do you know all this?? :O

and back to my other questions lol

when you playing the scale over it do you just pick any notes out of it? do the intervals matter?
#7
Quote by mick13
wow how do you know all this?? :O

and back to my other questions lol

when you playing the scale over it do you just pick any notes out of it? do the intervals matter?


You are free to draw upon any note of the scale (any note at all, really). The underlying chord will affect how each notes sounds, and there is certainly theory to explain why and how, but the best thing to do is learn as much theory as you can (I suggest starting with the crusade articles in the columns section) and then experiment with everything new that you learn to get a feel for what it sounds like and what you like.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
You are free to draw upon any note of the scale (any note at all, really). The underlying chord will affect how each notes sounds, and there is certainly theory to explain why and how, but the best thing to do is learn as much theory as you can (I suggest starting with the crusade articles in the columns section) and then experiment with everything new that you learn to get a feel for what it sounds like and what you like.

alright, one last thing, why would the modes not work? they are all the in the key of D. I memorized this mode patterns thing so I know most frets and the notes and know they won't work for this?
#9
Quote by mick13
alright, one last thing, why would the modes not work? they are all the in the key of D. I memorized this mode patterns thing so I know most frets and the notes and know they won't work for this?


A common misconception is that modes are just patterns on the fretboard. In fact, modes are a musical system in their own right, and are used is musical contexts specifically designed for them. The mode sticky covers them in detail, but you'll have a lot of difficulty understanding them until you have a strong grasp of tonal harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
A common misconception is that modes are just patterns on the fretboard. In fact, modes are a musical system in their own right, and are used is musical contexts specifically designed for them. The mode sticky covers them in detail, but you'll have a lot of difficulty understanding them until you have a strong grasp of tonal harmony.

alright, well I have a list of 7 patterns for the notes of all keys, will that work if I use the D major ones?
#11
Quote by mick13
alright, well I have a list of 7 patterns for the notes of all keys, will that work if I use the D major ones?


D major exists all over the fretboard. If you know all of the "patterns" of the D major scale, then you are free to use all of them.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.