#1
I'm a little confused concerning all the steps I would need to go through to accomplish what I'm trying to do.

I want to sand down my Squier, stain it blue, and then burst around it in black. Kind of like the finish is going to desecrate.

So should I do this like this?

1. Sand with lower-grit sandpaper.
2. Sand with higher-grit sandpaper. All nice and smoothlike.
3. Something here?
4. Stain with blue stain. Dilute stain more second time around. Stain again. Possibly stain a third time. Are there water based stains?
5. Let dry for how long?
6. Something here?
7. Spray lightly around sides and edges to achieve burst. Spray several coats and sand inbetween.
8. Let dry for how long?
9. Finish body.

What if I wanted to do the same to the neck, as well as the body?
Last edited by dz_alias at Feb 28, 2009,
#3
Quote by shinhoman

I've read many articles on there, thank you. Didn't comprehend much but I did put forth the effort. Regardless, my questions pertain to the combination of stains and regular paint. I googled such information but most of it's about oil-based stains and whatnot. Either way, I still want to make sure I'm going about this right.

So please post helpful information. I'd appreciate it.
#4
0. Apply a chemical paint remover allow it to dissolve the old finish and scrape off the bulk of it that way. Else you'll be sanding for a looooooooong time.
1. Sand with lower-grit sandpaper.
2. Sand with higher-grit sandpaper. All nice and smoothlike.
3. Something here? depends on the wood. if it's tight grained, you may need to apply something to open the grain so it will accept the stain. if the grain is too open, you might need to use a sealer to prevent the wood from soaking up the stain like a sponge. and some woods just don't stain well no matter what you do.
4. Stain with blue stain. Dilute stain more second time around. Stain again. Possibly stain a third time. Are there water based stains? yes there are.
5. Let dry for how long? depends on the stain. read the label.
6. Something here? i'd probably do a few coats of clear, just to get a smooth surface after staining.
7. Spray lightly around sides and edges to achieve burst. Spray several coats and sand inbetween. don't sand during the burst. the boundaries are very thin and you'll cut right through them.
8. Let dry for how long? label. read it
9. Finish body. clear, clear and more clear. sand between, as necessary.

What if I wanted to do the same to the neck, as well as the body?
then do it.
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#5
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
0. Apply a chemical paint remover allow it to dissolve the old finish and scrape off the bulk of it that way. Else you'll be sanding for a looooooooong time.
1. Sand with lower-grit sandpaper.
2. Sand with higher-grit sandpaper. All nice and smoothlike.
3. Something here? depends on the wood. if it's tight grained, you may need to apply something to open the grain so it will accept the stain. if the grain is too open, you might need to use a sealer to prevent the wood from soaking up the stain like a sponge. and some woods just don't stain well no matter what you do.
4. Stain with blue stain. Dilute stain more second time around. Stain again. Possibly stain a third time. Are there water based stains? yes there are.
5. Let dry for how long? depends on the stain. read the label.
6. Something here? i'd probably do a few coats of clear, just to get a smooth surface after staining.
7. Spray lightly around sides and edges to achieve burst. Spray several coats and sand inbetween. don't sand during the burst. the boundaries are very thin and you'll cut right through them.
8. Let dry for how long? label. read it
9. Finish body. clear, clear and more clear. sand between, as necessary.

What if I wanted to do the same to the neck, as well as the body?
then do it.

Thankee.