#2
probably $40-$50. if you want a setup worth your money though don't take it to guitar center. find a good local shop, they're better and usually cheaper.
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#3
Quote by mikeyElite
probably $40-$50. if you want a setup worth your money though don't take it to guitar center. find a good local shop, they're better and usually cheaper.


thanks for the response.

My D string sounds kind of flat. It's hard to explain but the other ones have that rich and ringing sound, whereas the the D string just sounds flat. It also gets out of tune faster than the others, much faster. any idea what that would be
#4
how old are your strings ?
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#6
the intonation is probably off on the d string. what kind of bridge does the guitar have?
Warmoth Strat w/ Lace Holy Grails
'07 Roadhouse Strat
Washburn WD-21 all Koa Acoustic
Marshall JCM-2000 TSL-122
Bugera V-5
#7
Quote by Rogue Hermit
the intonation is probably off on the d string. what kind of bridge does the guitar have?


its an epihpone les paul with the original bridge
#8
Quote by tknick90
its an epihpone les paul with the original bridge


i don't really know anything about that bridge, but you should be able to change the intonation. look it up somewhere. there should be a good guide online for this
Warmoth Strat w/ Lace Holy Grails
'07 Roadhouse Strat
Washburn WD-21 all Koa Acoustic
Marshall JCM-2000 TSL-122
Bugera V-5
#9
tune your guitar
play the harmonic at the 12th fret, and then play the fretted 12th fret note on the d string.

do they match on the tuner ?
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#11
Dont go to GC get a local tech to do it they will do it better my local tech even fixes any errors in my setups within 30 days of the setup. He does it right away too theres no waiting he takes it back right away and fixes it up for you. He lets you watch him do it too and explains it. So yeah the moral is go to a local tech.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#12
Here's how you set intonation. If you've heard the terminology " a guitars scale", that doesn't mean major or minor, it means the distance from the nut to the point on the saddle where the string crosses it. The scale on Gibson guitars is 24 3/4", Fenders are 25 1/2", and PRS's are 25". Use a tape measure and on the high E string, measure from the edge of the nut next to the fretboard to the saddle. Like I said you're measuring to the point on the saddle where the string crosses it. It should be exactly 24 3/4". Once you get it, make sure that both the open string and the 12th fret are both in tune. After you get the high E string, the rest is EASY. Next, move the B strings' saddle back from the E the thickness of the B string. The G string goes back the thickness of the G string. The D string should be even with the B string. The A string goes back the thickness of the A string. And the low E goes back the thickness of the low E string.
If you have any problems, let me know.
There's my way and the wrong way.