#1
i always wondered how i would go about putting larger strings on my start. i believe its always been on 9's or 10s, but i'm much more used to playing acoustic and think i can take on a higher gauge easily. i don't do much fret work and when i do i think the small strings actually make it harder, i kind of have chubby hands.

ANYWAY, how would i go about preparing my guitar for larger strings? you know, not to snap the neck.

mexican strat, by the way.
fck.
#2
You need to go to a guitar shop and get the truss rod adjusted for the gauge of strings you want. I went from 10's to 11's and I needed the rod adjusted. Shouldn't cost too much at all. Yeah ask the store assistant to change the truss rods tension So it is suited for *insert gauge here* strings.
Tim.

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#3
I've got a MIM Strat with stock pickups. I put 12's on last week. I had to take it to a guitar shop to get properly setup. Intonation was a problem and there was a lot of stress on the bridge. I just got it back yesterday and it sounds great. Cost me about $20. It took one day. I highly recommend getting it setup by a pro.
#4
if youve got any knowledge of guitars and setting them up, you can probably do it yourself. a slight touchup of the truss rod might be needed, but that isnt hard if you go slow and are careful. you may also need to add a spring if you have a floating trem, or at least adjust the springs it has. other than that, just adjusting the action/intonation at the bridge is the only thing you should need to do. which is once again simple if you know how to take care of your guitars. basicly you would just put the new strings on, then run a full set up including truss rod, trem claw, and action/intonation. might take half an hour or whatever, but its time well spent. however, if you dont feel comfortable doing it yourself, you can always pay to have someone at a shop do it.
#5
Depending on the gauge you use you may have to have a new nut, or the original one filed. Bigger strings may not fit in the stock nut causing all kinds of tuning and action problems.
I love all 5 (sold a couple) of my Carvin X-100b's.
#6
Quote by zeek7pc
Depending on the gauge you use you may have to have a new nut, or the original one filed. Bigger strings may not fit in the stock nut causing all kinds of tuning and action problems.


ah true, didn't even think about the nut needing to be a little bigger.

i remember seeing a guide online a LONG time ago on how to do it but i honestly dont remember the website, besides that it was a black background and the headings were in orange... something like that (which doesn't actually help at all, i know)
fck.
#7
I wouldn't bother going to get your truss rod done professionally, all you have to do is set your strings to what you think is the right action and then adjust your truss rod untill the buzz is ok. Obviously if you have like 1mm action then adjusting your truss rod will make no difference to the buzz but if you are carefull you should be able to hone in quite reasonably on a lightning fast action.

When I got my new guitar I took out the tremolo forgetting that I would have to reset everything (I have to know exactly how something works and hows it's put together before I can be satified with it). After I reaslised a large amount of swearing ensued but now I have it back to it's super speedy ibanez self and it's just as good as when I got it