#1
1. My versitility.

I'm into all sorts of ****. I'm trying to get a band together and i have a singer interested and a few guitarists lined up. Basically its an Alt Rock / Rock / Pop-Punk band.

Thats fine i dont mind doing that but the problem is I can't really sit down and go "I'm going to right the greatest pop-punk song ever!" because chances are I'll end up writing a pretty good blues lick instead of an amazing, radio friendly, pop riff. I cant really control what i come up with.

2. Ending/adding to a song.

I'll keep all my riffs and **** as GP files and every now and then I go through them and delete the **** and keep the good ones. Most never get past riffs and the ones that do either
A) never end and i have a 20 minute solo that gradualy gets added to. or
B) never get anywhere. and i just keep this riff that i cant add to.

Help me!
#2
Dude I used to have the same problem I wanted to write metal but I just had to except Im a Southern Rock/Blues player Its the songs my souls is a singin

Just make sure thats what your really into cause I can play All kinds of metal and I know the theory behind it too but I still cant come Up with great Metal riffs like Dimebag or Randy Rhodes but Im really cleaver in other styles it is what it is if your really love it it will happen if not what ever
Life's A Garden Digg It
-Joe Dirt
Last edited by WyldeMan666 at Mar 1, 2009,
#3
i have the same problem
Quote by SOADrox429
Dude... I want to date a drum major. I bet they could fuck in time to Tool.
#4
I think in order to write in a specific style, you've got to immerse yourself into that style. Start by listening to it...a lot. Then start learning songs by those bands. You're not going to write very convincing jazz songs if all you listen to is metal.
Also if your heart isn't into the style that the other guys want to do, that's ok. I believe that the best music comes out when its something you're really passionate about.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#5
if you are writing blues riffs when you are trying to write pop punk its probably because all you ever learned is the blues scale and you are just playing from muscle memory instead of actually thinking about what you really want and trying to achieve that. Hears some advice: train your ear better. Transcribe as many riffs as you can in the style you want and your ears and fingers will become accustomed to playing these sorts of things, then you will be able to write in that style. Learn some more scales and theory as well, pop punk builds off of the major scale a lot so learn that but the ear training is the most important
#6
For #2: TS, have you ever asked yourself "How do I want to end this?" Do you want to fade out, end with a sustaining chord, or make the drums end with a bang? Knowing is half the battle.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#7
Quote by Tg57
if you are writing blues riffs when you are trying to write pop punk its probably because all you ever learned is the blues scale


No. That was just an example. I play and write in lots of styles.

Quote by SilverDark
For #2: TS, have you ever asked yourself "How do I want to end this?" Do you want to fade out, end with a sustaining chord, or make the drums end with a bang? Knowing is half the battle.


Thanks. Normally I try to end it with something like that but cant quite get it to sound right.

Quote by seth's daddy
I think in order to write in a specific style, you've got to immerse yourself into that style. Start by listening to it...a lot. Then start learning songs by those bands. You're not going to write very convincing jazz songs if all you listen to is metal.
Also if your heart isn't into the style that the other guys want to do, that's ok. I believe that the best music comes out when its something you're really passionate about.



I get bored of most styles very easily. If i listened to pop-punk all the time I wouldn't want to ever play it. I would find it boring.
#8
Quote by Final !mpact
1. My versitility.

I'm into all sorts of ****. I'm trying to get a band together and i have a singer interested and a few guitarists lined up. Basically its an Alt Rock / Rock / Pop-Punk band.
Uh huh, call it punk like a regular person and be done with it.

Personally, I think calling your music a genre is stupid. Just write regardless of genre and let your fans (if you have any) name your genre.

Quote by Final !mpact
Thats fine i dont mind doing that but the problem is I can't really sit down and go "I'm going to right the greatest pop-punk song ever!" because chances are I'll end up writing a pretty good blues lick instead of an amazing, radio friendly, pop riff. I cant really control what i come up with.
Why should you try to control it? If you write a bluesy song, so be it.

Quote by Final !mpact
I'll keep all my riffs and **** as GP files and every now and then I go through them and delete the **** and keep the good ones. Most never get past riffs and the ones that do either
A) never end and i have a 20 minute solo that gradualy gets added to. or
B) never get anywhere. and i just keep this riff that i cant add to.

Help me!
I'm not sure if you realise this, but usually most people don't listen to riffs and progressions. They don't care. What they listen to and rock out to is the singing melody.

Start writing catchy singing melodies instead of catchy riffs. For reasons I don't feel like explaining, the voice is both the best and worst musical instrument.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#10
Quote by Final !mpact
1. My versitility.
... chances are I'll end up writing a pretty good blues lick instead of an amazing, radio friendly, pop riff. I cant really control what i come up with.
I don't like covers much, but there are a few songs that really got turned into something different. I remember Janez Detd making a punk version of Mano Negra's "La Mala Vida" which I really liked. And more recently Manic Street Preachers turned Umbrella into a great rock song which blew me away. (Give it a try. Even if you don't like it, it's impressive).

My point is that you shouldn't worry too much what style you write in. You can always rework it later to fit your band's liking.

2. Ending/adding to a song.
I heard once that John Lennon and Paul McCartney were each working on a song they couldn't find a fitting start or ending for. When they met later, they decided to fuse both parts and turned it into a great hit. I don't remember what song it was (which is really bugging me right now), but if you have tons of parts lying around, why not try something like that?

I agree with Demon: the main melody is what's most important. But I think it is what you do with it (timbre and harmony-wise) that makes it a great song.
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
Uh huh, call it punk like a regular person and be done with it.

Personally, I think calling your music a genre is stupid. Just write regardless of genre and let your fans (if you have any) name your genre.


But if I'm playing to a crowd and i go from genre to genre there not going to like it very much. How would you like it if you went to go see Metallica and they played Jonas Brothers, Nirvana and Billy Joel covers?


I'm not sure if you realise this, but usually most people don't listen to riffs and progressions. They don't care. What they listen to and rock out to is the singing melody.

Start writing catchy singing melodies instead of catchy riffs. For reasons I don't feel like explaining, the voice is both the best and worst musical instrument.


I cant write vocal melodies. I dont know what should go into a vocal melody since i dont sing.
Last edited by Final !mpact at Mar 1, 2009,
#12
Well take Muse for example , they have really slow songs like Megalomania or Hoodoo , and really heavy songs like Dead Star.
And the crowds love them , you just need to find balance , also the transition from loud to soft or the other way around works great , if you go from slow to hard you build up tension (that sounded so gay) and if you go the other way around you have pauses for your fans to catch their breaths.
#13
I've had that exact problem, I've made some great riffs and I just can't think what to put after them or something.

They were metal riffs, and I love to play metal but I've discovered my heart is in prog rock but I've got a ton of metal influence to throw in there, and I'm finishing songs now basically.

So what I'm saying is you should just let yourself do what feels right rather than try and write in a specific style that simply isn't you. Unless you really feel the passion is there, in that case I'm not sure what other advice to give xD