#1
I'm fairly new to guitar (a few months practice. . . on average an hour or two a day) and am wondering if anyone has a few pointers to "stopping" the sound from a string after hitting it open - For example, when I play a series of quater or eighth notes, and one of them is on a open string, and the next is on a different string, the previous note will sometimes be left ringing - Sometimes I managed to stop it, but is there any "method" to do this properly so I can improve and perhaps get better at string stopping faster?

Also . .. is there any method to "go from chord to chord"? Or is it just PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE?

Thanks for your time @__@
"If history is to change, let it change. If the world is to be destroyed, so be it. If my fate is to die, I must simply laugh."
#2
Mute it by slightly touching it with your palm or a finger, I prefer to use a finger. (Eg; I hit it open then mute it with my index finger while playing another note on another string with my middle finger)

For chord changes, just practice chord progressions.

Start at the slowest speed you can do comfortably. (G, C, D, C, G, C, D, C, G, etc...) and keep practicing and practicing.

Get the 'muscle memory' of the chord shape into your brain, invision your fingers where they need to go before you fret, watch your fingers fret, repeat.

Do that until you can comfortably (and as quickly as you want) change from G to C, C to D, and D to C.

Then work on other chords and other chord progressions.

The important thing is to PRACTICE THE SAME THING until you have it down.

*wears the thread for why to do that when I need it :P:*




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 1, 2009,
#3
Well yeah like above mute unwanted noise with your hand thats how its usually done.

As far as chords go you will get the hang of it. You just need to teach your fingers to move as a unit instead of individually. Once you get that down you will be able to do it with ease, I play chords that Ive never even played before and within about 10 minutes I can create them in no time.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#4
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
Mute it by slightly touching it with your palm or a finger, I prefer to use a finger. (Eg; I hit it open then mute it with my index finger while playing another note on another string with my middle finger)

For chord changes, just practice chord progressions.

Start at the slowest speed you can do comfortably. (G, C, D, C, G, C, D, C, G, etc...) and keep practicing and practicing.

Get the 'muscle memory' of the chord shape into your brain, invision your fingers where they need to go before you fret, watch your fingers fret, repeat.

Do that until you can comfortably (and as quickly as you want) change from G to C, C to D, and D to C.

Then work on other chords and other chord progressions.

The important thing is to PRACTICE THE SAME THING until you have it down.

*wears the thread for why to do that when I need it :P:*


Thanks, I'll have to give that a try tomorrow^_^

Quote by Lethal Dosage
Well yeah like above mute unwanted noise with your hand thats how its usually done.

As far as chords go you will get the hang of it. You just need to teach your fingers to move as a unit instead of individually. Once you get that down you will be able to do it with ease, I play chords that Ive never even played before and within about 10 minutes I can create them in no time.


Does it matter which hand you use? As in, do you tend to use the hand you use strumming, or the hand you use to hold down strings? Or does that even matter, as long as it works?
"If history is to change, let it change. If the world is to be destroyed, so be it. If my fate is to die, I must simply laugh."
#5
As long as it works. If I can, I like to use my fretting hand to mute unwanted noise, but when I must, I use my strumming hand.
When life gives you lemons, squirt juice in your enemies' eyes.
#6
Quote by Angelbroken
Thanks, I'll have to give that a try tomorrow^_^


Does it matter which hand you use? As in, do you tend to use the hand you use strumming, or the hand you use to hold down strings? Or does that even matter, as long as it works?



I use my picking hand usually, leaves the fretting hand free to hit the notes
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#7
It depends what string for me.

If I'm moving to a higher (eBG) I use my strumming hand.

If I'm moving to a lower (DAE) I use my fretting hand.

But thats because it's comfortable for me.




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#8
Alright. . . My problem now is speed. . . maybe I just need practice, but whenever I try to "mute" the string, I screw up my melody (since this only happens when I'm playing eight notes. . . sometimes quarter) and my brain has to stop and remember to mute the string and I make a mess X.X
"If history is to change, let it change. If the world is to be destroyed, so be it. If my fate is to die, I must simply laugh."
#9
Guitar honestly is just memorization and practice once you have it memorized you get faster by playing it repeatedly.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#10
I'll keep that in mind:

Heres an example of what I'm talking about: Its for the bass Guitar, but I play it on the standard 6 string guitar (it works. . . just sounds a bit higher) It's played at 150beats per minute, and you can see where the open "ringing" string is left off. . . I guess I'll just need to practice multitasking better

EDIT: The main problem is the last note on the first bar, the "open string G". . because I hit another open right after, leaving enough room to keep ringing. . and since its so fast (well. . for a nub like me its fast) I can't "stop" the sound and keep going at the same time.

"If history is to change, let it change. If the world is to be destroyed, so be it. If my fate is to die, I must simply laugh."
Last edited by Angelbroken at Mar 1, 2009,
#11
if you play heavy metal then usualyl alot of thigns are connected to palm-muting which is why metal guitarists dont worry as much about open strings, a combination of your right and left hand do the trick. when playing thre note power chords with the root on the 6th string, use your index finger to slightly touch the 3rd 2nd and 1st strings so that you mute them if you accidentaly hit them. when playing power chords on the a-string, you can either use the tip of your index finger and mute the low E (definitely takes practice until it becomes natural) or you could take yoru middle finger which should be free and lightly mute the string. i never use this method but i rather use the first one and it sounds fine.

EDIT i just looked at the tab for the song you're trying to play, you could always substitute the open string with the 5th fret of the string below it. in your case i would just place my palm on the string whenever i want it to stop ringing.
Last edited by vp_nyc at Mar 1, 2009,
#12
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1077681&page=1


Slow down, don't go straight into 150bpm...

Play it at 60bpm using a metronome.

Work your way up to 70bpm in 2 bpm increments. (60>62>64>66>68>70)

Make sure you're practicing it CORRECTLY, with the mutes.

Build up the accuracy.

With accuracy comes speed.

Perfect practice makes perfection.

Read the 'book' on that website. REALLY READ IT. It talks about things becoming habitual (sp?), meaning you do it WITHOUT THINKING.

That's what you want.

With enough practice (PERFECT/CORRECT practice, so you don't have to "unlearn" to learn the correct way later on), you can do anything you set your mind and dedicate yourself to




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#13
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1077681&page=1


Slow down, don't go straight into 150bpm...

Play it at 60bpm using a metronome.

Work your way up to 70bpm in 2 bpm increments. (60>62>64>66>68>70)

Make sure you're practicing it CORRECTLY, with the mutes.

Build up the accuracy.

With accuracy comes speed.

Perfect practice makes perfection.

Read the 'book' on that website. REALLY READ IT. It talks about things becoming habitual (sp?), meaning you do it WITHOUT THINKING.

That's what you want.

With enough practice (PERFECT/CORRECT practice, so you don't have to "unlearn" to learn the correct way later on), you can do anything you set your mind and dedicate yourself to


Many Thanks ^_^ I'll begin practicing these methods tomorrow (Its a bit late tonight to start up again )
"If history is to change, let it change. If the world is to be destroyed, so be it. If my fate is to die, I must simply laugh."