#1
first off, I want to check compound is a time sig divisible by 3?

if it is then here's my problem. I had a riff with a bar in 9/8, then 2 in 6/8. I put on the click track on 1/4 so i get a constant click sound and try to play. whenever I record it I always play it too slow because the stressed beats are the 1st and 4th (and 7th in 9/8) and I play it in 8th triplets instead of 16ths so I play three notes instead of four notes per click. whenever I get 4 notes per click I usually end up with the stressed beats in the wrong places and eventually out of time.

how do I play these time signatures along to a metronome?

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#2
what program do u use for recording? in audacity, you could just generate one measure in 9/8 and put two in 6/8 behind it
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#3
Does this only happen when recording?

When you record, ur computer converts ur audio into information, and if you have a metronome running on the computer, then the metronome itself can go out of time, cause it starts lag due to lack of ram memory available.

Audio takes up quite alot of work-memory, you'd be surprised.

That's why most dedicated audio interfaces have their own ram chips, cause ur ram memory is also used for the graphics of ur computer (displaying windows and the like) and running it in general.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 1, 2009,
#4
the problem i have is the when i have the stressed beat every third, but im playing 16th notes (i dont always want polyrhythms :p) i play 8th triplets instead. i put recording in there coz i only really use a metronome for technical practising.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#5
does the metronome go like, in 6/8, 1 & a 2 & a?

If so, you should change it to 1 & a 2 & a - it'll make it easier to stay in time.

I'm not sure if that was your problem
#6
Quote by Declan87
does the metronome go like, in 6/8, 1 & a 2 & a?

If so, you should change it to 1 & a 2 & a - it'll make it easier to stay in time.

I'm not sure if that was your problem


it goes *1* 2 3 4 5 6 *1* 2 3 4 5 6 - it looks at them as fractions where the numerator = amount of clicks, denominator is speed.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
it goes *1* 2 3 4 5 6 *1* 2 3 4 5 6 - it looks at them as fractions where the numerator = amount of clicks, denominator is speed.



You should play to a drum track maybe.

Or at least a sequenced click track, cause a metronome doesn't cope with the time signature changes, unless all the changes in the piece can be divided by the same clicks in the forms of eights.

Example 5/8 to 6/8 to 11/8 you can set a metronome to the 8th note clicks obviously.

I'd still stick with a drum groove though, cause time signatures often work because the drummer accents it, to make it stand out better.

Mike Portnoy/Petrucci is a perfect example of how the most weird time signatures can still sound "right" and organic/"natural".

Look at the track "The Mirror" from the Awake album (DT) which features a very cool thing. Petrucci plays the same riff and portnoy changes time signatures by redividing accents and grooves.

Here's the link, the intro (First minute) is so cool imo, how they play with time is very tasty.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kONQ8cp3Tlc

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 1, 2009,
#8
count three notes for each click. 123 456 or 123 456 789

the underlying feel of 6/8 is two and 9/8 is three