#1
How do you guys mike your kick drums to get the best sound that you're looking for?

i've been trying a couple of different techniques lately. i play mostly heavy alternative/punk stuff. so i want the kick to sound precise, but not too prominent and have too much presence, or else it will end up with a Metal sound.

i've tried throwing a large diaphragm at the end of a cardboard tube that was attached to the kick drum. it added just little bit of precision to the kick that wasn't there before. while i had that going, i also had a shure sm57 pointed towards the whole of the kick drum.

ultimately it turned out pretty nice, but i probably won't use the setup again. too much hastle for like a 10% increase in sound.
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#2
Well, you might try using a mic actually made for a kick drum, such as a Sennheiser E602 (which is very punchy, and really captures the 'click' of the snare drum) or the AKG D112, which is another good choice.
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#3
It IS pretty important to have the right mic for the job. something that is tough enough and sturdy enough to be able to catch those low frequencies at high intensities without clipping or distorting the mic itself. Dynamic mics like the SM57 are great for miking the snare and toms, but aren't generally optimal for kickdrums..

where you're miking makes a huge difference too. if you want to catch most of the 'woof' or the 'boom' then just placing it outside the port of your outer drum skin will achieve that. if you want more click, then placing it more inside the drum pointed at the spot where the beater hits the head will achieve this as well.

this is only a loose idea, the best is to keep experimenting. not all drums are built and ported equally so its difficult to have a specific one size fits all answer.
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#5
Quote by fridge_raider
Well, you might try using a mic actually made for a kick drum, such as a Sennheiser E602 (which is very punchy, and really captures the 'click' of the snare drum) or the AKG D112, which is another good choice.


I find the e602 is really good for catching the 'boom' of the kick drum, with a little bit of the click.

Apparently, the AKG D12/D112 mics really focus on the click sound. People who don't like them compare the end result to a basketball.

The EV RE-20 is among the de facto industry standards for kick drums.

For our album, we had an RE-20 and an e602... for our particular drum kit, in our particular room, we chose the e602. In fact, every kick in my profile was done with the e602.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 1, 2009,
#6
Micing kick drums takes a lot of experimentation. Having a mic that can handle a high SPL, like a Beta 52, or D112 will make a world of difference, especially in that genre. You need to start by getting the bass drum tuned up, so that it has a nice low end and thud. You want to set it up differently than you would in a live situation, which possibly means less muffling. Having a hole in the reso head is good, because you can get the mic right inside to get the action of the beater. There is usually a sweet spot where you can get a perfect blend of click and thump.

Also an RE-20 would work better for a deeper sounding kick sound, but in the punk/alternative genres the trend seems to be the click, mixed with a bit of the low-end thud. Also keep in mind most of the bass drum sounds you hear in modern rock music are samples.
#7
unfortunately i don't have access to the d112 nor can i afford it.

but i DO have an AKG414. any thoughts on that?

also i have the kick drum mic that comes with the samson 8 piece drum mic kit
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#8
i personally love large diaphragm condensers for kicks. i would totally try that 414 out ( i never have but might now out of curiosity). i use whatever i can get my hands on, usually a Neumann U87. but i think the important thing is distance, have someone move it closer and farther while the drummer is kicking and just keep listening. i always build a "hut" around my kick drum mic too, to allow for minimum bleed into said mic, especially if it is outside of the kick drum.

*oh yeah, i have blended 2 mics too, but like you said its a hassle, im trying to keep it as simple as possible while sounding as good as possible*
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Last edited by hoondog at Mar 1, 2009,
#9
Quote by hoondog
i personally love large diaphragm condensers for kicks. i would totally try that 414 out ( i never have but might now out of curiosity). i use whatever i can get my hands on, usually a Neumann U87. but i think the important thing is distance, have someone move it closer and farther while the drummer is kicking and just keep listening. i always build a "hut" around my kick drum mic too, to allow for minimum bleed into said mic, especially if it is outside of the kick drum.

*oh yeah, i have blended 2 mics too, but like you said its a hassle, im trying to keep it as simple as possible while sounding as good as possible*


haha cool i'm glad i gave you an idea! but really my only concern with using the 414 is would the kick drum damage the microphone in any way? or any condenser mic for that matter? because it takes so little pressure for it to pick up any noise, i have to wonder.

and yea the 2 mic thing just isn't worth it really. i'm glad i tried it out though. thats the best part about home recording is the experimental factor.
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#10
Quote by hoondog
i use whatever i can get my hands on, usually a Neumann U87.


1. You *own* a U87, or just have access to one?

2. Assuming (maybe not fair, I know....) you don't actually own a U87... who lets you drop one in front of a kick drum? I sure as hell wouldn't risk that with a U87 if I owned one.

EDIT (correcting myself)

I found this on another forum.... apparently straight from the horse's mouth:

Here is some more info

Dear *Mr. Barratt,

The microphone can hardly be damaged by sound. The limit for the distortion is overdriving the circuits which results in clipping. For very high sound pressure levels the diaphragm may stick to the electrode but the the tension within the diaphragm should prevent permanent sticking.

With best regards
Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin
Jürgen Breitlow
Microphone Development


Heh.... who'd a guessed?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 1, 2009,
#11
yeah man its real tough to break a mic from sound. the thing i worry about more is a drummer hitting one haha, which is the only thing stopping me from putting condensers on more drums.

but yeah dude put that 414 on that thing and slap a pad on it if you have one on your board/ interface and you should be fine.

the problem i have sometimes with the u87 is too much low end, it has a completely flat response the whole way to the bottom (at least it sounds almost that way), so i usually have to cut like 50hz and below just to help the kick be more focused.

ill see if i cant post a kick i did with a U87.

*ah yes. there is a clip under my profile called "some mix samples". the first clip in that series is a condenser (U87). i think you will find it gives you a very natural and almost fluid (?) sounding kick (as opposed to alot of the crazy processed, thud click stuff heard today, especially in metal, but could be achieved im sure with some serious 4.5k added)*
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Last edited by hoondog at Mar 1, 2009,
#12
Quote by hoondog
yeah man its real tough to break a mic from sound. the thing i worry about more is a drummer hitting one haha, which is the only thing stopping me from putting condensers on more drums.

but yeah dude put that 414 on that thing and slap a pad on it if you have one on your board/ interface and you should be fine.

the problem i have sometimes with the u87 is too much low end, it has a completely flat response the whole way to the bottom (at least it sounds almost that way), so i usually have to cut like 50hz and below just to help the kick be more focused.

ill see if i cant post a kick i did with a U87.

*ah yes. there is a clip under my profile called "some mix samples". the first clip in that series is a condenser (U87). i think you will find it gives you a very natural and almost fluid (?) sounding kick (as opposed to alot of the crazy processed, thud click stuff heard today, especially in metal, but could be achieved im sure with some serious 4.5k added)*



will do! i love the sound of the kick on that sample of yours, though. thats pretty much the sound i'm going for.

do you remember the mic placement?
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#13
it really changes everytime depending on the kick. if i remember correctly this one was just inside the front head- probably not a bad starting point at the very least...
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