#1
I can improvise melodies in any scale pretty well now, but they are always a bit boring, just jumping around a scale, and occasionly changing key if I know the fifth... but all my improvs lack emotion

Ideally I want to be able to spice up my playing with little chords, and I need to know how to escape from the tiny box that is the scale i'm in. I find a scale, but don't know how to move out of that scale's shape.

Please give me some tips!!!
Thanks, UG
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#2
When I had the problem of "Wanting out of the box of whatever scale I'm in" I learned every single not on the neck. Which isn't that hard. Learn the notes of the first twelve and you know the notes of the next 12. Then I learned what notes were in the scale, not just the pattern. Thats how you can shred all up and down the neck and know what chords are cool and which ones will kill it.
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#3
Fast shred in your songs lets you jump out of key for notes, for example if say you're playing in the key of A and you do a little shred to lead into a phrase or melody, you could hit pretty much anything as long as they're at least 16ths and you end on a note in the chord. Buckethead does this throughout the Soothsayer solo; if you listen to it, you'll hear in the "shredding" parts that some of the notes aren't in the key at all, let alone in the chords.

For emotion...only you can express emotion through expression techniques. Accent notes, bend notes, tell a story through the guitar.
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#4
I find the best way to get emotion is by playing in the relative minor. EG we're playing a chord progression in Gmajor - G D Am we could play in g major, boring, or in E minor, the relative minor. The easiest way to find the raletive minor of a key is just by counting 4 frets down (has no theoretical merit of course). but jst try improv over that progression in Eminor pentatonic, it will sound very soulful/
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Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#5
This is a good place to employ some knowledge of music theory. If you know the scale, then you should be able to think of the primary chords.

Infact with out any real knowledge of music theory, you have probably already discovered the chords which belong to a a key, are built upon the notes of the scale. So armed with this rudimentary knowledge, you can pretty much play any 3 diatonic notes together, and have it fit inside your improvisation (at least diatonically, not neceassiraly aesthetically)

This is a reasonable place to start, and as was stated earlier, getting to know the notes of the fretboard is a must. Knowing the shapes can take you far, but knowing what you're playing can go further.
#6
Three, no? G - 15, E - 12

What I did, was used that site with the jam machines, can't remember the name, and they have these recommended scales, that show the whole neck, and gradually I realised that a lot of the E string(s) will sound good if you know your scales along a string, and then I started using the pentatonic box that starts on the 3rd fret, low E and ends at the 10th fret, high E, to move me around, and then throw in some major and minor scale notes, some easy arpeggios, and you're good.
#8
Quote by gabcd86
Three, no? G - 15, E - 12


not if you count G
G F# F E = 4
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#9
For improv, i basically find out the key a song's in by working out the riff by ear. Then when i figure that out, i use that knowledge with modes to work out wherever i'm allowed to go on the fretboard. And if simple licks are getting repetitive i use double stops or play three or more notes within that mode, for a chord, and it seems to work for me.

What i'm saying is, MODES ARE THE KEY! LEARN THEM ALL!
#10
Quote by charlie__flynn
I find the best way to get emotion is by playing in the relative minor. EG we're playing a chord progression in Gmajor - G D Am we could play in g major, boring, or in E minor, the relative minor. The easiest way to find the raletive minor of a key is just by counting 4 frets down (has no theoretical merit of course). but jst try improv over that progression in Eminor pentatonic, it will sound very soulful/


No. Just...no. Keys don't work that way. You need to read the theory sticky as well.
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