#1
I've been practicing and learning solos to analyze them and improvising by myself but I got a problem: my improvising is really slow, not because I can't play fast but because I don't know what to play fast. The scales sound dull when played fast I need some good ascending, descending and transition licks that are fast.
Any tips or advice?
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#2
1. LEARN THE NOTES ON THE NECK!
2. Learn How to Link the notes together
3. Learn all 5 positions of the Major & Minor Penatonics
4. Learn the Melodic Minor Scale
5. LEARN THE MODES
6. Don't try to speed through all the Scales, take time to go through all of them and learn them properly, otherwise you'll just sound terrible.
#3
Quote by tsukoyomimoon
I've been practicing and learning solos to analyze them and improvising by myself but I got a problem: my improvising is really slow, not because I can't play fast but because I don't know what to play fast. The scales sound dull when played fast I need some good ascending, descending and transition licks that are fast.
Any tips or advice?


Firstly, melodic ability is vastly more important than speed. Although a fast run here and there can be very effective and exciting, it should never be the main focus of your playing. Always aspire to be as melodic and as tasteful as you can. Running up and down a scale as fast as you can or trying to get from point A to point B in the quickest time possible is something you really should be wary of.

One of the best ways to get the feel of playing melodically is to simply listen to some melodic guitar players. Listen to their licks, try to learn them and then transpose them into different keys. Understand the underlying chord progression of a song and listen closely to how the guitar player plays with the changes and hits certain notes that accentuate certain chords.

Really the best way to become a tasteful player is to keep an open mind and listen to many different players. Practice improvising over certain songs and keep listening and listening to those guitar players.
#4
Quote by XtAsY2007
Firstly, melodic ability is vastly more important than speed. Although a fast run here and there can be very effective and exciting, it should never be the main focus of your playing. Always aspire to be as melodic and as tasteful as you can. Running up and down a scale as fast as you can or trying to get from point A to point B in the quickest time possible is something you really should be wary of.

One of the best ways to get the feel of playing melodically is to simply listen to some melodic guitar players. Listen to their licks, try to learn them and then transpose them into different keys. Understand the underlying chord progression of a song and listen closely to how the guitar player plays with the changes and hits certain notes that accentuate certain chords.

Really the best way to become a tasteful player is to keep an open mind and listen to many different players. Practice improvising over certain songs and keep listening and listening to those guitar players.


Let me clarify. I like how my solos sound and I think they are at least decent and melodic.
The problem is that I want to spice them a little with some quick runs here and there, if possible
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I think this man wins the thread.

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#5
Quote by tsukoyomimoon
Let me clarify. I like how my solos sound and I think they are at least decent and melodic.
The problem is that I want to spice them a little with some quick runs here and there, if possible


Ah, OK so you want to learn some fast runs. Well check out some tasteful speedy guys. Allan Holdsworth must have the most fluid, fastest legato technique I've heard and his phrasing is pure melodic goodness. Check out his album Metal Fatigue and you'll see what I mean.

Guthrie Govan is another great, speedy player, using tapping, legato and alternate picking for his speed. Check out some of his stuff.

Steve Vai and Joe Satriani are also great players to check out. Just listen to their fast passages and work them out for yourself. Take things slowly and repeat the licks while gradually building speed.
Last edited by XtAsY2007 at Mar 1, 2009,
#6
Quote by XtAsY2007
Ah, OK so you want to learn some fast runs. Well check out some tasteful speedy guys. Allan Holdsworth must have the most fluid, fastest legato technique I've heard and his phrasing is pure melodic goodness. Check out his album Metal Fatigue and you'll see what I mean.

Guthrie Govan is another great, speedy player, using tapping, legato and alternate picking for his speed. Check out some of his stuff.

Steve Vai and Joe Satriani are also great players to check out. Just listen to their fast passages and work them out for yourself. Take things slowly and repeat the licks while gradually building speed.


This is one of the best things I could possible tell you. It will focus you less on 'learning to play x amount of notes in y amount of time', and more one how the run is phrased, so more on how it actually sounds.