#1
I'm trying to learn "Hey Sandy" by Polaris and I am having a bit of trouble moving to and from the open chords(D, A, F#, and E specifically). Can anyone recommend me any exercises that will improve my chord transitions?
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#2
Basically it is all just practice, practice, and more practice. You won't get better over night, but your fingers will just start to automatically find their right place on the fretboard.
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#4
Quote by nieschizzle
I'm trying to learn "Hey Sandy" by Polaris and I am having a bit of trouble moving to and from the open chords(D, A, F#, and E specifically). Can anyone recommend me any exercises that will improve my chord transitions?

Yes, practice the song.

Questions like this crop up all the time and it amazes me - if you can't do something then you simply need to practice the thing you can't do, not something else.
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#5
Yes, I also have problems with changing from chord to chord. So what I did to monitor my progress was to pick a song that contained the chords I have trouble with and started a spreadsheet.

In the spreadsheet I have four columns: Chord x (starting chord), Chord y (chord I'm changing to), # chord transitions in 1 minute, # chord progressions in 2 minutes.

So far I seem to be progressing:

2/25/2009 G D 33 79
3/2/2009 G D 54 117
3/2/2009 D C 35 77

Although I can perform 54 chord changes in one minute, I still find that I am putting one finger down at a time. Is this normal? Do you find that you are using one finger at a time to finger the chord?

Thanks and I hope this helps!
#6
Quote by yu217171
Yes, I also have problems with changing from chord to chord. So what I did to monitor my progress was to pick a song that contained the chords I have trouble with and started a spreadsheet.

In the spreadsheet I have four columns: Chord x (starting chord), Chord y (chord I'm changing to), # chord transitions in 1 minute, # chord progressions in 2 minutes.

So far I seem to be progressing:

2/25/2009 G D 33 79
3/2/2009 G D 54 117
3/2/2009 D C 35 77

Although I can perform 54 chord changes in one minute, I still find that I am putting one finger down at a time. Is this normal? Do you find that you are using one finger at a time to finger the chord?

Thanks and I hope this helps!

54 chord changes in one minute is less than 1 change a second and that is slow. your slowness is directly related to the way you are changing. you need to build the chord with your hand in the air and your fingers should hit the strings at approximately the same time. this means that you NEED TO SLOW DOWN and practice this method. THEN speed up from there... use a metronome every count while set up at 60 BPM is exactly 1 second so you should be able to monitor your speed fairly accurately however chord change is not always about speed it is about comfort, tonal cleanliness, and fluidity.
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#7
F# is a barre chord, so you'll want to spend alot of time practicing those.
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#8
Quote by Sieves
54 chord changes in one minute is less than 1 change a second and that is slow. your slowness is directly related to the way you are changing. you need to build the chord with your hand in the air and your fingers should hit the strings at approximately the same time. this means that you NEED TO SLOW DOWN and practice this method. THEN speed up from there... use a metronome every count while set up at 60 BPM is exactly 1 second so you should be able to monitor your speed fairly accurately however chord change is not always about speed it is about comfort, tonal cleanliness, and fluidity.


Hey Sieves,

Thanks for your constructive criticism. I never thought to "build the chord" in the air but the concept makes perfect sense. I will try this out and let you know how it works out. Do you have any other tips regarding chord changes? Thanks!
#9
Here's an exercise that I guarentee will help you with chords. Grab whatever chord you're going to practice. Play each note individually, to ensure that all the notes ring clearly. Then begin squeezing and releasing the tension on the chord. Don't lift your fingers completely off the strings. Just release the tension. Make sure that your fingers remain on their tips, (unless of course you're barring). Don't let them "sag". Do this in 5 minute intervals. After 5 minutes, shake your hand out, wiggle your fingers, and see if they go back to the chord. You may have to repeat this a few times, but eventually they'll go right to the chord.
Also, visualize the chord in your head. You should be able to see in your mind what string and fret each finger is going to.
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#10
Quote by yu217171
Yes, I also have problems with changing from chord to chord. So what I did to monitor my progress was to pick a song that contained the chords I have trouble with and started a spreadsheet.

In the spreadsheet I have four columns: Chord x (starting chord), Chord y (chord I'm changing to), # chord transitions in 1 minute, # chord progressions in 2 minutes.

So far I seem to be progressing:

2/25/2009 G D 33 79
3/2/2009 G D 54 117
3/2/2009 D C 35 77

Although I can perform 54 chord changes in one minute, I still find that I am putting one finger down at a time. Is this normal? Do you find that you are using one finger at a time to finger the chord?

Thanks and I hope this helps!

I can do Am to C to G to D to Fadd9 in under a second
but these are simple chords, for example
i cant do Am7 to G7 to B7#9 to E7#9 as quickly
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all