#1
once you figure the chords in a song, how do you figure the progression?
edit: when i say progression i mean, I ii IV vi. not like Am D Cm.
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#2
The intervals.

I = Unison
II = Flat 2nd?
III = Natural 2nd
IV = Minor 3rd
V = Major 3rd
VI = Perfect 4th
etc.

So you'd take the KEY of the song, construct the MAJOR SCALE, and determine it from there...

I'm bad at this as well -_- .... /will wait to see if I was correct




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#3
Typically you use your ear and knowledge to establish a place of rest, attribute this place of rest with a name, commonly referred to as key or tonal centre, and from that information label each chord accordingly. Or did I misunderstand your question?
#4
Quote by RHCP987123
once you figure the chords in a song, how do you figure the progression?
edit: when i say progression i mean, I ii IV vi. not like Am D Cm.



well i'm assuming you know the key? i'm a little confused with your question, if you know the key you will know the progression

like C F G is the I IV V of C major.
#5
im asking how to find the key of a song.
for ex. Dani California by RHCP's progression in the verse is Am, G, Dm, Am. how do i figure out that Dani California is in Am?
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#6
Quote by RHCP987123
im asking how to find the key of a song.
for ex. Dani California by RHCP's progression in the verse is Am, G, Dm, Am. how do i figure out that Dani California is in Am?


It resolves in Am..... all the chords are in the key of Am....

I'd assume that...

/pretty sure I'm correct.




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#7
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
It resolves in Am..... all the chords are in the key of Am....

I'd assume that...

/pretty sure I'm correct.

so to find the key, i have to figure out which key the chords fall into, doesn't this seem too long and tedious?
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#8
Quote by RHCP987123
so to find the key, i have to figure out which key the chords fall into, doesn't this seem too long and tedious?


Working forwards is the easy part.

Working backwards makes it hard.

But eventually you get really good at it, look at it, and can just say.


But from what I gather... yes.. long and tedious




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#9
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
The intervals.

I = Unison
II = Flat 2nd?
III = Natural 2nd
IV = Minor 3rd
V = Major 3rd
VI = Perfect 4th
etc.

So you'd take the KEY of the song, construct the MAJOR SCALE, and determine it from there...

I'm bad at this as well -_- .... /will wait to see if I was correct


Sort of. Unison-minor second-major second- and so on. The Roman numerals are used to label chords, I'm not so sure about intervals.
Last edited by blueriver at Mar 2, 2009,
#10
The notes are a good place to start. For example, in Dani California, you have Am, A C E, GM G B D, and Dm D F A. so we have A B C D E F G, we know those notes form a C major scale, or its relitive Minor, which of course is A minor. Sense it starts and ends on Am, and has no C in it, it is a very safe bet that the progression is A minor. Hope that helps a little.
#11
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
The intervals.

I = Unison
II = Flat 2nd?
III = Natural 2nd
IV = Minor 3rd
V = Major 3rd
VI = Perfect 4th
etc.


So you'd take the KEY of the song, construct the MAJOR SCALE, and determine it from there...

I'm bad at this as well -_- .... /will wait to see if I was correct

noo

its the same as romal numerals.

in the key of C major

I C major
II D minor
III E minor
IV F major
V G major
VI A minor
VII B diminished

then back to I
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#12
Read this first: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_7_analyzing_a_chord_progression.html

Then come back to ask questions if you still have any.
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#13
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
noo

its the same as romal numerals.

in the key of C major

I C major
II D minor
III E minor
IV F major
V G major
VI A minor
VII B diminished

then back to I


The more I know





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#14
alright lets take Santeria by Sublime for example,
basic chords throughout the song are:
verse: E-G#-C#m-B, chorus: A-B-E
now the key of A has the following scale, A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A, all of these chords fall into the scale except B, it should be minor b/c in the key of A, B is the ii tone/interval; also G#.
so can anyone explain this? or do i have the wrong key?
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#16
Quote by RHCP987123
alright lets take Santeria by Sublime for example,
basic chords throughout the song are:
verse: E-G#-C#m-B, chorus: A-B-E
now the key of A has the following scale, A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A, all of these chords fall into the scale except B, it should be minor b/c in the key of A, B is the ii tone/interval; also G#.
so can anyone explain this? or do i have the wrong key?

Some songs just have chromatics in them. "Dirty Reggae" by the Aggrolites, for example, has a verse progression of A major, G major, E major.

Now, E major has a G#, and G major has a G natural. I'm sure it can be explained as "borrowing from the parallel minor of the sub-dominant" or what not, but for your sake at your level of theory knowledge, just consider them chromatic accidentals.


EDIT: Santeria is in the key of E
#17
Quote by RHCP987123
alright lets take Santeria by Sublime for example,
basic chords throughout the song are:
verse: E-G#-C#m-B, chorus: A-B-E
now the key of A has the following scale, A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A, all of these chords fall into the scale except B, it should be minor b/c in the key of A, B is the ii tone/interval; also G#.
so can anyone explain this? or do i have the wrong key?



Well, because of the chorus, I would think it was in the key of E-major, not A major, in which case:

I=E ii=f#m iii=g#m IV=A V=B vi=c#m vii=d(dim)

So we would have a III, which is also a V/vi, or a G#Maj
if it was in A Major your G# would be a vii0 which is a G#dim.
Last edited by Sunny_lsd at Mar 2, 2009,
#18
Quote by RHCP987123
alright lets take Santeria by Sublime for example,
basic chords throughout the song are:
verse: E-G#-C#m-B, chorus: A-B-E
now the key of A has the following scale, A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A, all of these chords fall into the scale except B, it should be minor b/c in the key of A, B is the ii tone/interval; also G#.
so can anyone explain this? or do i have the wrong key?


For beginners, I think it's better to dissect each chord. You have to realize what notes make up the chords.

Like you said - in the key of A, B would be minor and G# should be diminished.

Just remember that for every MAJOR scale, the chords follow this pattern:

I - Major
ii - Minor
iii - Minor
IV - Major
V - Major
vi - Minor
vii - Diminished

So, A would be A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m, G#dim

And remember that a lot of songs don't stick strictly to one key.

Did you read the article I posted earlier? You should really probably start at the beginning of the Crusade articles if you haven't read them yet.

I'm so nice (and bored at work), I'm going to do this one for you...

E - Major chord, so it must be degree I, IV or V of a major scale.

It could be the I of the E major scale.
It could be the IV of the B major scale.
It could be the V of the A major scale.

G# - Major chord, so it must be degree I, IV or V of a major scale.

I of the G# major scale
IV of the D major scale
V of the C# major scale

C#m - Minor chord, so it must be degree ii, iii or vi of a major scale.

ii of the B major scale
iii of the A major scale
vi of the E major scale

B - Major

I of the B major scale
IV of the F# major scale
V of the E major scale

A - Major

I of the A major scale
IV of the E major scale
V of the D major scale


SO....we see that E major is the most common scale among the chords. The only one that doesn't fit is the G#.

And, since the the song resolves to E - it's pretty safe for us to say it's in the key of E major.
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#19
Quote by Guitartist
For beginners, I think it's better to dissect each chord. You have to realize what notes make up the chords.

Like you said - in the key of A, B would be minor and G# should be diminished.

Just remember that for every MAJOR scale, the chords follow this pattern:

I - Major
ii - Minor
iii - Minor
IV - Major
V - Major
vi - Minor
vii - Diminished

So, A would be A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m, G#dim

And remember that a lot of songs don't stick strictly to one key.

Did you read the article I posted earlier? You should really probably start at the beginning of the Crusade articles if you haven't read them yet.

I'm so nice (and bored at work), I'm going to do this one for you...

E - Major chord, so it must be degree I, IV or V of a major scale.

It could be the I of the E major scale.
It could be the IV of the B major scale.
It could be the V of the A major scale.

G# - Major chord, so it must be degree I, IV or V of a major scale.

I of the G# major scale
IV of the D major scale
V of the C# major scale

C#m - Minor chord, so it must be degree ii, iii or vi of a major scale.

ii of the B major scale
iii of the A major scale
vi of the E major scale

B - Major

I of the B major scale
IV of the F# major scale
V of the E major scale

A - Major

I of the A major scale
IV of the E major scale
V of the D major scale


SO....we see that E major is the most common scale among the chords. The only one that doesn't fit is the G#.

And, since the the song resolves to E - it's pretty safe for us to say it's in the key of E major.

smart guy.
thanks man.
so should i do that for every song?
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#20
Quote by RHCP987123
so should i do that for every song?
Yeah. Eventually it becomes second nature.

Sometimes a song can be rather ambigous with a couple different possibilities or even downright challenging. One song someone posted not too long ago that is not so straight forward at first glance was Wrong Way by Sublime. It almost seems to change keys every stanza.
Si