#1
first of all sorry if this isnt the right place for this thread.. but im wondering on how to harmonize things.. i know you can harmonize with 3rds but i dont understand how.. do they mean the 3rd of the scale? 3 notes away from your root? i dont know =[ please give me a simple set of notes and how to harmonize them. you guys know what i mean.. thanks so much!!!!
#2
Harmony is just two notes at once. There are two ways to harmonize in thirds, for example.

Example melody : A C E D E A

The first way to harmonize in thirds is to play just play the major or minor thirds for each note, I'll use minor in this example.

Harmonized in minor thirds example : A&C - C&Eb - E&G - D&F - E&G - A&C


The second way is to harmonize diatonically (according to the scale). This melody is in A minor, so we will be counting three notes up in the scale, including the starting note, to find it's third.

Harmonized in diatonic thirds example : A&C - C&E - E&G - D&F - E&G - A&C


Harmony get's much more complicated than this, but it's a start.
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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
Last edited by The_Sophist at Mar 1, 2009,
#3
i too have a question.

i understand to harmonize an Am scale, you move up three frets to harmonize in 3rds.

i also understand that there are minor and major thirds. for a minor 3rd, its 3 frets, major 3rd, four.

BUT, i dont understand when youre harmonizing a minor scale in 3rds, that some are minor and some are major 3rds.

example:

A-C minor
B-D minor
C-E major
D-F minor
E-G minor
G-B major

why are there major 3rds when you are hamonizing a MINOR scale in 3rds? please explain
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#4
Because minor scales are not composed of only minor thirds. Take a minor chord for example, you have a minor third from the root to the third, and then a major third from the third to the fifth.

Minor thirds are more dissonant than major thirds, so a scale composed of all minor intervals would sound very wierd (IMO).
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
The Minor scale techniqually, is a major scale, just starting on a different note *Aeolian mode, correct?* So thats why it has major and minor harmonies, similar to the major scale
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#6
Learn how to construct major and minor scales. When you understand the intervals harmonizing is really easy.
#7
Quote by Colton165
i too have a question.

i understand to harmonize an Am scale, you move up three frets to harmonize in 3rds.

i also understand that there are minor and major thirds. for a minor 3rd, its 3 frets, major 3rd, four.

BUT, i dont understand when youre harmonizing a minor scale in 3rds, that some are minor and some are major 3rds.

example:

A-C minor
B-D minor
C-E major
D-F minor
E-G minor
G-B major

why are there major 3rds when you are hamonizing a MINOR scale in 3rds? please explain

When harmonizing using a scale major or minor you only use notes from that scale. So if we look at the minor scale the answer should be clear:
Am scale = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = A B C D E F G

Some distances are a minor third such as A to C and some are a major third such as C to E or G to B. If we harmonized C to Eb (a minor third) we would be using a note outside the A minor scale so we wouldn't be harmonizing "diatonically" by the minor scale we would be harmonizing by minor thirds.

What makes the scale minor is the minor third distance between the tonic and the third.
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 2, 2009,
#8
Quote by Zinnie
The Minor scale techniqually, is a major scale, just starting on a different note *Aeolian mode, correct?* So thats why it has major and minor harmonies, similar to the major scale


The Major scale and the minor scale are NOT THE SAME THING. The fact that some have the same notes is just a coincidense, they are made up of different intervals and therefor have a different sound.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#9
salbarbz20 You don't play 3 notes away. You play 2 scale tones away from the root. So if you are in A minor play the the A minor chord. That contains a triad. Which means it shares 3 scale tones in that key. In that example you would have A E C. This is jumbled up. The root is A C is the actual Third ans in A 1B2 C3 skip D4 and then E5. A C and E. you can play a riff something like A B C for four measure and play 2 scale tones away from each on the second guitar. So te second guitar would play something Like C D E. Play those like powerchords A and C together then second chord B and D together and C and E together. The first two are minor 3rd powerchords. the third powerchord is a major third powerchord. All youre doing is playing chord tones together but seperately with different instruments. The same applies is you wanted to play fifths. Play an A5 powerchord then a B5 then a C5 and the other musician plays E F G. Be careful with the B and play it with an F instead of F3 to keep t in key because the seventh scale tone contains a diminished note. THis is because scales consist of 7 notes. 7 is an odd number so the "triad" gets scrambled on the 7th note. So you be playing something more like A5 Bb5 and C5.
#10
Quote by pahlavinka
salbarbz20 You don't play 3 notes away. You play 2 scale tones away from the root. So if you are in A minor play the the A minor chord. That contains a triad. Which means it shares 3 scale tones in that key. In that example you would have A E C. This is jumbled up. The root is A C is the actual Third ans in A 1B2 C3 skip D4 and then E5. A C and E. you can play a riff something like A B C for four measure and play 2 scale tones away from each on the second guitar. So te second guitar would play something Like C D E. Play those like powerchords A and C together then second chord B and D together and C and E together. The first two are minor 3rd powerchords. the third powerchord is a major third powerchord. All youre doing is playing chord tones together but seperately with different instruments. The same applies is you wanted to play fifths. Play an A5 powerchord then a B5 then a C5 and the other musician plays E F G. Be careful with the B and play it with an F instead of F3 to keep t in key because the seventh scale tone contains a diminished note. THis is because scales consist of 7 notes. 7 is an odd number so the "triad" gets scrambled on the 7th note. So you be playing something more like A5 Bb5 and C5.
Start a new thread if you want to talk about harmony.