#1
I use two different guitars, one with active pickups, the other, passive, and decided i'd like to invest in a volume pedal. i've decided to go with ernie ball, unless someone else has a better suggestion, and i wanted to see if there was a benefit to getting the active one rather than the passive one if i'm going to use both guitars.

tl&dr: passive and active guitars, which volume pedal?
#3
I have a Warrior with EMG's and then 2 others with SD's and a volume pedal on my ME-50. It does the same thing to all three of them, there's no difference whatsoever... buy whatever the hell volume pedal you want.
1992 Gibson Explorer (Seymour Duncan '59 neck, Custom Custom bridge)
Jackson King V Professional Std. (Seymour Duncan Invaders)
Mesa/Boogie Nomad 55
Mesa/Boogie 412 Recto. O/S Cabinet
Boss ME-50
MXR 10-Band EQ
#4
If you are going to put the volume pedal after the guitar with passive pickups then you need the passive pedal. Neither pedal is "active", but they have different resistance pots which makes them appropriate for placing after active or passive circuitry. The passive pedla is more versatile because it can be placed after an active circuit anyway. But the opposite is not true because an active pedal will suck the tone out of your passive pickups.
#5
either way the pedal will only distort the sound on a tube amp...yuou know that right? when you push the volume up when a signal hits the preamp you distort the sound and when you lower the volume your sound cleans up.... i d say get a nice equalizer pedal cause then you get a volume slider (volume pedal) and you get the opportunity to drop/boost frequencies you like/dislike.
#6
Quote by fly135
If you are going to put the volume pedal after the guitar with passive pickups then you need the passive pedal. Neither pedal is "active", but they have different resistance pots which makes them appropriate for placing after active or passive circuitry. The passive pedla is more versatile because it can be placed after an active circuit anyway. But the opposite is not true because an active pedal will suck the tone out of your passive pickups.

this is what i was looking for. thank you.

@ georgakis187
i'm using it in the loop, not in front so it won't do any of that. i'm using it for swells and the like so it's a different operation.
#7
if its in the fx loop they why do you care about your pickups??? its already past the preamp so its the same signal you d get from passive or active pickups.
#8
Quote by SlappyMcLardfat
i'm using it in the loop, not in front so it won't do any of that. i'm using it for swells and the like so it's a different operation.
Good thing you posted this. You may want to get an active pedal. It would help to know the input impedance of the amp return. Here's why....

A volume pedal works as a voltage divider. If the input resistance of the device plugged into the output of the pedal is high (like a pedal or amp input) then the sweep of the pedal is mostly dependent on the taper of the pot. If the input resistance is low then the load affects the sweep response. A high resistance volume pedal (i.e. passive) is affected more than a low resistance pedal (i.e. active) when plugged into a low impedance input. Active circuits that run at line level generally have a lower input impedance (in the 10K's of ohms) vs. passive circuits which have high input impedance (in the 100Ks or 1Ms of ohms).

A passive pedal plugged into a low impedance input will have a sweep that kills the volume too fast. That's because as you sweep the pedal the resistance of the pot inside the pedal will rise quickly in relation to the resistance in the load. You can see if you have a 250K passive pedal plugged into a 25K input then the resistance ratio rises quickly when you sweep the pedal. An active pedal of 25K plugged into an input of 25K will sweep much more evenly.

Anywhere else but the loop would be fine as every pedal plus your amp has a high input impedance because they are designed to have a passive guitar plugged into them. Some amp loops run at instrument level and some at line level. If your amp runs at line level and has a low return impedance then you will want an active pedal.
Last edited by fly135 at Mar 3, 2009,
#10
Quote by georgakis187
either way the pedal will only distort the sound on a tube amp...yuou know that right? when you push the volume up when a signal hits the preamp you distort the sound and when you lower the volume your sound cleans up.... i d say get a nice equalizer pedal cause then you get a volume slider (volume pedal) and you get the opportunity to drop/boost frequencies you like/dislike.

you do realize that a volume pedal doesnt increase the volume right? so it wont distort any amp at all if out front, it would just lower the volume and possibly clean it up. its just like using your volume knob, it cant add any more volume than is already there.
#11
no you are wrong....if you use a volume pedal in front it acts as a clean boost and will distort the preamp tubes in a preamp.

why do you think volume pedals have a battery/power supply? if they didnt give volume they d just be a resistor like in your guitars volume pot.

research...i cant believe people cant do that with da InTeRnEtZ.
#12
where is the power input on this one? most volume pedals are voltage dividers, plain and simple. power supplies are for things like buffers or optical circuits. i dont think ive ever tried a volume pedal that could actually raise the volume. which is why wah pedals can be turned into volume pedals by just removing a capacitor, they dont boost anything.
#13
georgekis, it's best not to continue your line of reasoning. All amps have a certain amount of clean headroom. A volume pedal is independent of that. If your amp doesn't distort with a direct connection, putting a volume pedal in front is not going to make it distort unless it has active gain and you dial it in.

What you are saying is the same as saying the only reason for a volume pot on a guitar is to distort your amp. Stop now before you dig your hole deeper.
#14
maybe i misinterpreted volume pedal for clean boost....a stronger signal from the guitar=less clean headroom and more gain.
#15
Quote by jof1029
where is the power input on this one? most volume pedals are voltage dividers, plain and simple. power supplies are for things like buffers or optical circuits. i dont think ive ever tried a volume pedal that could actually raise the volume. which is why wah pedals can be turned into volume pedals by just removing a capacitor, they dont boost anything.

Which capacitor, out of curiosity?
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#16
Quote by georgakis187
maybe i misinterpreted volume pedal for clean boost....a stronger signal from the guitar=less clean headroom and more gain.
I don't know which volume pedals have active gain, but the Ernie Ball is a resister divider with no gain. The Morley Pro series uses nine volts and has a min volume control. The Morley's pedal and min volume pot control a pair of LEDs that drive a light modulated resister divider. Again no gain.
#17
Quote by stratman_13
Which capacitor, out of curiosity?

cant remember off the top of my head, but you can check out the wah modding thread in GB&C. im almost positive that the answer is in that thread.