#1
As it turns out, I'm a complete moron when it comes to scales and modes and anything else of that nature. So, I just have a few quick questions that I would greatly appreciate if they were answered in a way that a 5 year old would understand.


G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, D is the G Major Scale correct?

Played


-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
---------------2-4-5---------
-------2-3-5-----------------
--3-5-------------------------



However, if I started on A

like this,


-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
---------------2-4-5---------
-------2-3-5-----------------
---5--------------------------




what mode is this? or is it still just the G major scale? I've read countless articles and they're all really hard to follow so any help would be appreciated and any tips and tricks on how to find modes and anything else of the like.

Thanks in advance.
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#2
Quote by Shredxmyheart
As it turns out, I'm a complete moron when it comes to scales and modes and anything else of that nature. So, I just have a few quick questions that I would greatly appreciate if they were answered in a way that a 5 year old would understand.


G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, D is the G Major Scale correct?

Played


-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
---------------2-4-5---------
-------2-3-5-----------------
--3-5-------------------------



However, if I started on A

like this,


-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
---------------2-4-5---------
-------2-3-5-----------------
---5--------------------------




what mode is this? or is it still just the G major scale? I've read countless articles and they're all really hard to follow so any help would be appreciated and any tips and tricks on how to find modes and anything else of the like.

Thanks in advance.

if you play a G major scale starting on A would be A dorian (i could be wrong on the name)

basically yo can play a scale that contains the same ntose as the key your in. So G major, A Dorian, E minor (aeolian), etc.

it works because they are the same notes. but the different shape gives the scales a different feel in the song.

don't quote me on this i could be wrong on some details but basically that's how it works
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#3
MODES STICKY. READ IT.

Modal music depends on the backing music. If you have a chord progression going that resolves to G, you AREN'T playing any modes of G major no matter what. If the song resolves to G, you aren't playing in A Dorian, B Phrygian, F# Locrian or any other mode. It's still G major, just starting on a different scale degree.
#4
Quote by JakdOnCrack
MODES STICKY. READ IT.

Modal music depends on the backing music. If you have a chord progression going that resolves to G, you AREN'T playing any modes of G major no matter what. If the song resolves to G, you aren't playing in A Dorian, B Phrygian, F# Locrian or any other mode. It's still G major, just starting on a different scale degree.


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#6
Don't be confused. It's not about "starting" on a different note it's about using a different root note. When we write or play through a scale we usually start on the root note. In practice you can start wherever you want. What will differ between the modes is which note the root note is.

If you play these notes G A B C D E F# and G is the root/tonic/final then it will sound like the stable home note. All the other notes will sound in some relation to that G note.

If you play the same seven notes but A is the root/tonic/final then the A will sound like the stable home note and all the other notes will sound in relation to the A. For example the G will sound like a minor 7th - not the tonic.

How do you make the tonic a specific note?

This is a little more complex. One way, the most common way of establishing a specific tonal centre, is through a simple chord progression that resolves well and creates that sense of stability on the right chord. Another way is a pedal bass note or simple chord vamp (banging away on one or two chords without providing real harmonic movement away from the tonic). You can also do it through the melody alone but that's a bit tougher.

Oh and...
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Does anyone else see this statement as self defeating?
No.
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 2, 2009,
#7
Quote by gizmodious
Does anyone else see this statement as self defeating?

No, it was perfectly correct.
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
No, it was perfectly correct.

What if the mode is the Ionian?
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#9
Quote by gizmodious
Does anyone else see this statement as self defeating?


nope, he's perfectly correct.

if the progression is in G, you're either playing G major or you're playing in the wrong key.

modes are not magical scale formulas that let you start on a different note than the rest of the band and not sound like crap. the fact that you can derive them by reordering a major scale is just a coincidence.

to actually USE a mode, you'd have to play in it's key (ie: play in A if you're using an A dorian scale), and make sure that none of the notes in any of the melodies or chords are outside your modal scale. it's pretty hard to do, and isn't that commonly heard.

modes are better seen as a good bit of theory that can help you make an educated guess as to where to add accidentals to a standard major or minor scale.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Mar 3, 2009,