#1
Forgive the terminology if I didn't use it right. I just learned about parrell scales and this brought up another question. I for some reason catagories scales in different types.

Major and Minor
Pentatonic
Modes

Are all of these types of "scales" capable of being mixed when improvising? I generally do not mix them and I feel I am limited.

Also is this typical in rock music or is it the exception?
#2
Yes in many cases you can. There is alot for you to learn though, and to it's alot more than can be explained in a forum online, though I'm sure some will try.
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#3
you can play any mode that contains the same notes of the scale you are in.


So the second mode in G major (A Dorian) can be played over a G major progression and it will sound fine. it will just lend a different feel to a song.
same for if you played E minor over a G major. it simply lends a different feel to the solo, even though technically it is the same notes.
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#4
Quote by atla18
you can play any mode that contains the same notes of the scale you are in.


So the second mode in G major (A Dorian) can be played over a G major progression and it will sound fine. it will just lend a different feel to a song.
same for if you played E minor over a G major. it simply lends a different feel to the solo, even though technically it is the same notes.

No, you're wrong. If it's a G major progression, you aren't playing A Dorian or E minor. You're playing G major, starting on a different scale degree.
#5
Quote by JakdOnCrack
No, you're wrong. If it's a G major progression, you aren't playing A Dorian or E minor. You're playing G major, starting on a different scale degree.

+1

start thinking about parallel scales, not relative ones.
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#6
Quote by JakdOnCrack
No, you're wrong. If it's a G major progression, you aren't playing A Dorian or E minor. You're playing G major, starting on a different scale degree.


correct

This is getting to be a really common thing of people coming in and saying relative scales can be switched between at will, it's not possible. As above says, if your progression is G major and you play G major (regardless of what note you start on) you are playing G major.

Ts I try not to think of major and minor as seperate from pentatonic scales, after all the pentatonic only comes about by removing two notes from major and minor. Now I would kind of agree with you about catagorizing modes seperately from the other scales, the only reason being that you can't really use them the same way. To use a mode you have to build a chord structure around the mode you want to use so a lot more thought has to go into it.