#1
Giving them, not receiving them. And I don't know what to do.

I was almost completely self taught on bass so I really don't know how this whole "lesson" thing is supposed to go.

The guy said he played piano most of his life and is familiar with musical notation, theory, so on and so forth which I know makes it way easier. But where do I begin? Do I give him "homework"? What about the second lesson? Third? Help appreciated.
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#2
Notes on the fretboard, half-steps all that. Learn scales in two or three postitions. Major and minor. Let him kind of figure it out. Get him good posture and teach him how to shape his tone and EQ. From there, just do wahtever, maybe get him going on some stuff. No tabs.
#3
I would begin with basic set-up: where your right/left hands go, sitting and standing posture, etc. Have him try some open-string plucking hand techniques, things like that.

Next lesson could be fretting, left hand permutions.(or w/e its technical name is) I would get a hal leonard book (the one that ed friedland wrote, I think) You could also teach him the basics of eqing, and have him experimenting at home to find a tone he likes.

For homework let him pick an easy song, and let him learn it. When he plays what he learned the next lesson, you can spot any bad technique and help him sort it out.

It all depends on how fast he learns, and if he's older, you may need to be careful about "teaching" him. Straight up suggestions could make him angry, if he's that type.

Someone will no doubt have things to contradict here (for your benefit!^^) so take everything with a grain of salt. Everyone has a way to do this.
#4
I'm kinda in the same boat. There's this girl interested in learning bass. The bad part is gonna be letting her borrow my MIJ Ibanez sb900 limited edition to learn on. It's got a case so all should be well. anyways. back on topic. I'm gonna start with what parts of the bass are what and tuning and such cuz she's a beginner to music. After that I'll start with technique like keeping your thumb behind the neck and stuff like that. I'll give her some standard exercises and such like scales and other exercises for finger strength. Also, tell him to learn songs he likes. Try to start with easy ones but if he runs into something that's too hard it gives him something to work towards. Symphony X has been that for me for a long time.
dean edge one 5 string
Schecter studio-4
Samick fairlane-6
Ibanez sb900
Ibanez btb775
Fender p bass special deluxe

Dean Del Sol
Ibanez prestige rg2610

Peavey TKO 65
Peavey vb-2
Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
Last edited by Revelation at Mar 2, 2009,
#5
Maybe the first lesson shouldn't involve the bass at all? A good chat with the fellow, ask him about his style, where he wants to go with bass and what he hopes to gain from you. I cannot find it online sadly, but in my book for starter bassists, Claypool wrote a fantastic piece about just talking to someone about learning a new instrument. The psychology behind it, the dedication and where the ability to compose comes from. It does go very "out there", but that's a good thing. If you can tap into his own personal feelings about bass playing, you can make it better for him and yourself. Find out the little things that drive him on (example "The ability to hear a bass line develop in my mind") and remind him of this, 'tap into' this emotion he already has. I know i'm now coming across as the failed psychology geek that I am, but there's an old saying I love "Those who can't change their mind, can't change anything". If you can get this guy mentally on form for learning, then the practical side will be easier (in my opinion).

Oh and most important thing, enjoy yourself!
#6
Ya true. i kinda forgot about that kind of stuff because when we were on the subject of her learning bass we talked about stuff like that. Make sure you have this conversation with the guy.
dean edge one 5 string
Schecter studio-4
Samick fairlane-6
Ibanez sb900
Ibanez btb775
Fender p bass special deluxe

Dean Del Sol
Ibanez prestige rg2610

Peavey TKO 65
Peavey vb-2
Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
#7
take a bar (measure) and have 'em play quarter notes in common time 4/4......1st position i.e; 1,2,3,4 frets. something like _________
---------------------------------------------------
---0----------------------------------------------3--
-----------3-------------3------------5---------------
--------------------------------------------------- easy, slow grooves
<Insert Witty Comment Here>

1981 Fender Lead I Seymour Duncan humbucker, Mesa BoogieIIIRectifer, MKIIRhodes,PRS
#8
From experience as a teacher, your first lesson is (If he's not a beginner) going to be just getting a feel for where he as as a musician. Talk and throw riffs around until you feel you have a good grasp of where his ability is then you can go from there. The hardest (And coolest!) thing about teaching music is how much quick thinking and reasoning there is involved, sometimes a student will get a concept right off the back that you think is going to take weeks, and other times you'll spend multiple sessions on a concept you think as simple. Everyone learns differently, so there's really no way to plan for it efficiently.
When you were born, you cried, and the world rejoiced. Live your life in such a manner that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice.
Kabir
#9
Should you teach theory or technique first?
I started teaching a friend and it was bothering me.

Should they get a grasp of notes to begin with, and work with that?
Or learn how to play simple notes and get a feel for the fretboard first, and then add the theory on top of that?
#10
If you're not sure what to teach someone you are by no-means in a position to teach them anything...

I develop a flexible learning plan for each student, everyone learns differently and picks things up in different ways and you should be able to adjust with them.
Gear

Fender Geddy Lee Jazz
Fender MIA Precision
Musicman Bongo
Boss TU-2
EBS TD650
EBS ProLine 2x10 x 2
#11
Whenever I've taught, I always start with the instrument- what it is, what things do. No point using a tool if you don't know about it. Giving a student a song is also pretty useless in my eyes. In the context of a technique, then yes, use a song. I also encouraged people to play along to a song- not the actual bassline, but see what they would play, after given the progression (which also ties in nicely with tea.ching theory- applying it to a situation as opposed to just reading it).