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#1
I'm at this point in life where I have to make a huge choice, and considering where this is I bet you know where this is going. I'm in 11th grade now and I'm graduating next year. My true dream is to make a living off of music, but I'm afraid. I'm afraid I can't sustain myself trying, I'm afraid my relatives will kill me, and I'm afraid that the fact that college is in my head forces me to focus more on school than all out becoming a better guitarist and the best possible performer I can be. This would've been much easier if the economy wasn't as bad as it is, but I just don't know what to do. I don't want to spend a ton of money on college when I really know what I want to do with my life. My insides are telling me that pursuing my dreams will leave me happier ultimately and the only thing keeping me from doing that is everyone around me, but I also know that I probably won't be able to sustain myself and will be forced into doing what other people do, going to college, getting a conventional career, etc. Not that I don't believe you can be in college and work with a band, but I believe that if you're going to be in college then you might as well focus 100 percent on it or it'll come back to bite you. Same with a band.

How do you all feel?
#2
I wanna make my living writing short stories and playing in bars. If i get famous that wouldnt be bad, but i would be content at bars. If that ****s up im gonna join the circus. **** it.
#3
wall of text

...

but basically, from what i gathered, your wondering if its possible to start out and make money purely from music, quick answer, no its not, alot of people in bands have main jobs and they use the money from that to survive and get music gear, until you become a name then it may be hard, but im not saying dont go for it, dont let anything stop you with your dream, i never did and i was invited to replace the guitarist of a band without even an audition because people he knew also knew people who knew me and what i could do, but, im still running my day job (technically night as its all nightshifts)
Gear:

Jackson RR-3 Eerie Desert Swirl
Alden Warlord Guitar+Bass
Encore Strat
KTone Alpine White 6/12 Double Neck SG
Digitech RP500
Kustom Amp KGA16R

And A Bunch Of Other Stuff
#4
do what you want to. there's no point in living life if you're not gonna enjoy what you do. yeah it's risky, but if you really love it, you can find a way to make it happen. you can always teach or become a tech or anything like that, you don't have to make it as a pro guitarist for some touring band. even playing at local bars will bring some cash in, and you still have the rest of the week to work. so ultimately it's up to you, but if it were me, I would go for it. I don't wanna spend my life working in some boring office, busting my ass just to bring in the rent. If I'm gonna be working hard, I want it to be playing guitar.

That's just me though, and I'm only turning 16, so you might not wanna take me advice
#6
Well, I'm with you, except the college I'm going to is a music college, so... You may not be able to sustain yourself for the beginning weeks/months, but you will eventually. Personally, as long as I have food/shelter with a bed, I don't really care about much else. Rule #1 of living your life: Don't let other people (even your relatives) dictate your life. If they're offering advice, heed it. If they're doing the opposite, ignore them. Just because they gave up on their dreams doesn't mean you have to.

I don't know what else to tell you. I say go for it, if you love music as much as you say you do. But again, my opinion is just an opinion. You need to decide for yourself. Good luck, and I hope you find happiness in whatever you do


EDIT: And uh... Like Greekboy said, I just turned 16 not too long ago. So my views may be rendered as invalid, haha.
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
Last edited by SchecterC-1+Man at Mar 2, 2009,
#7
I totally agree bro,
I have the exact same problem,
heres how i see it,
Music is your passion, it's what your good at, it's what you love, don't throw it away by going to collage for some bull-**** degree and spend your life behind a desk working 9-5 sucking dick for the rest of your life.

On the other side.

It kinda hurts me to write this, b/c i wish it wasn't true, but you need to have something to fall back on,
Heres my idea:
Im gonna go to a collage and get some sort off music/guitar related degree,
that way im still doing what i love, but im prepared for how life really is.
You gotta hope for the best/ prepare for the worst.

Don't really know if this will help at all, but i read your post and identified with it so, i thought i'd say my peace.
Rock is like sex. One you play it (have it), you're hooked!
-Clazgar

Turn up, tune in, drop out-Timmothy Leary

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Last edited by McGnrAcDcfan227 at Mar 2, 2009,
#8
I was at the exact same point you're at a while ago. I'm in college now, and I'll be honest with you, I don't get to play guitar as much these days. You could still be in a band and be in college, and it would work much better if say, you formed a band in your dorm or something. But most of the time you know it doesn't work out perfectly like that, and I have had to end up sacrificing being in a band for a while. But you could make more time for college work and band time if you didn't party and just focused on hitting the books when you can and enjoying the time you have to play music. It can be done, but you will be exhausted almost all the time and will have no time for anything else.
#9
that's why god created community college. you do need something to fall back on, just in case.
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'91 Eric Clapton strat w/ MT-2 preamp and piezo bridge system

Lotus '62 Strat replica
Epiphone Sheraton w/ Pearly Gates Pups
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Epiphone Tom Delonge ES-333

Epiphone EJ-200CE

Traynor YCV40T
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#10
I am having the same dilemma, man. What i've decided is that i'm going to get an associates degree in audio engineering, and hopefully get a job in a recording studio. I'll be around music for my day job, PLUS i'll have access to a recording studio, so I'm hoping to set up a band during college. Like someone else said, I just want to be able to live off of it. I don't care if I make it famous.
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#11
My advice- Go to music school. That way you will be in a place with like-minded people with similar goals and you will find solace and freedom in those goals. Get some minor degree to get a cheezy music job or something by which you can sustain yourself as you try to reach your goals. I just turned 16 3 months ago. I'm working to get into a good liberal arts school to study preformance and music history or music production (or perhaps music biz). By the time I leave college i'll be 21 and still have some time to get a band out there kicking ass.
The guitarist from a band called Hypernova, a band from iran which struggled for years just to get out of an opressive environment and now is enjoying success in the USA once told me - "Follow your heart, becauase whatever you dream will come true as long as you fight for it"
#12
How long have you been playing, is this just a phase? Are you going to be able to dedicate all your time to music without losing your passion? Is music really what you want to do with your life? Do you like the IDEA of doing music for a living or are you genuinely for it?

I think these are some important questions to ask yourself. Remember, people often feel differently about things when it becomes a job.
#13
You have to ask yourself a question: Do I want to have a life in music, or do I want to be a rock star?
If it's the latter, go to college. You are in it for the wrong reasons, and quite frankly, you have a better chance of being struck by lightning than being in a touring band for the next 40 years.
If you want to have a career in the music industry, that's another story. But you have to a) have an incredible amount of talent and b) an even great work ethic. You also have to be very business-savvy. Either way, I recommend college. If you do it right, you're done by the time you're 23. Then you have the rest of your life to pursue music, but still have something so that you don't end up one of those bitter jerks in the guitar department of a music store who can't get over the good old days.
#14
Quote by Zycho
How long have you been playing, is this just a phase? Are you going to be able to dedicate all your time to music without losing your passion? Is music really what you want to do with your life? Do you like the IDEA of doing music for a living or are you genuinely for it?
.


I've been playing for 3 years already ( I turn 17 5 months from now ). No, this is not just a phase, I've had this feeling for years. Honestly, I can say it's been on and off because I've had my doubts, I thought of going to college and then afterward or during pursuing music on the side, but then school and then a job after college will get in the way and I know I really want to do music. By "music" I specifically mean being a performer/ recording songs. I would be okay with a temporary job in the music industry however ultimately that's what I want to do.

Quote by koslack
You have to ask yourself a question: Do I want to have a life in music, or do I want to be a rock star?
If it's the latter, go to college. You are in it for the wrong reasons, and quite frankly, you have a better chance of being struck by lightning than being in a touring band for the next 40 years.
If you want to have a career in the music industry, that's another story. But you have to a) have an incredible amount of talent and b) an even great work ethic. You also have to be very business-savvy. Either way, I recommend college. If you do it right, you're done by the time you're 23. Then you have the rest of your life to pursue music, but still have something so that you don't end up one of those bitter jerks in the guitar department of a music store who can't get over the good old days.


So are you saying that if I want to be in a touring band that I should just go to college and not pursue it fully? I don't want to be a " rock star". I do want my music to get out to as much people as possible via concerts and such. That's the difference between how you ( other people ) and I think. How can you become truly talented if you do not dedicate time to becoming good? Even practicing in your room doesn't really help you develop stage presence, marketing tactics , and other such things that help a band at becoming successful. At 23 years old I'll have to compete with other 23 year olds who have possibly been working their ass off learning the things full time that I couldn't, therefore lessening my chances.

A point that you touched on was basically how all of this is temporary, this is something I do realize and it adds much other problems to the issue. Eventually there's going to be a point where you can't get a gig even if you're successful, what happens then? I have no problem going back to school or getting a regular job, I'd also have saved some of my money.
#15
Go to college, learn a trade, that way you always have something to fall back on if the music isn't earning you enough money or even to fund your music career to start with.
Also, colleges are often full of musicians who form college bands, which is an advantage to any musician, even if you don't join any of the college bands, you can still gain contacts.

Being in a band while also a college student can also be a good way of making a little badly needed extra cash, and it's all experience after all.
#16
Quote by Toniofalcon
Not that I don't believe you can be in college and work with a band, but I believe that if you're going to be in college then you might as well focus 100 percent on it or it'll come back to bite you. Same with a band.

How do you all feel?


it will bite you in the ass more than not. I was/am in that current position working full time, going to school full time and a band. It is rough, but I make it work.

But in all reality follow your dreams. If you are in a band or find a band that really has their **** together, then by all means give the band thing a hardcore shot. Its something I wish i did. You are at an age where you can make a "dumb" choice and the only thing it will do is set you back a couple of years.
My Gear
Guitars:
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#17
Quote by Toniofalcon
I've been playing for 3 years already ( I turn 17 5 months from now ). No, this is not just a phase, I've had this feeling for years. Honestly, I can say it's been on and off because I've had my doubts, I thought of going to college and then afterward or during pursuing music on the side, but then school and then a job after college will get in the way and I know I really want to do music. By "music" I specifically mean being a performer/ recording songs. I would be okay with a temporary job in the music industry however ultimately that's what I want to do.


So are you saying that if I want to be in a touring band that I should just go to college and not pursue it fully? I don't want to be a " rock star". I do want my music to get out to as much people as possible via concerts and such. That's the difference between how you ( other people ) and I think. How can you become truly talented if you do not dedicate time to becoming good? Even practicing in your room doesn't really help you develop stage presence, marketing tactics , and other such things that help a band at becoming successful. At 23 years old I'll have to compete with other 23 year olds who have possibly been working their ass off learning the things full time that I couldn't, therefore lessening my chances.

A point that you touched on was basically how all of this is temporary, this is something I do realize and it adds much other problems to the issue. Eventually there's going to be a point where you can't get a gig even if you're successful, what happens then? I have no problem going back to school or getting a regular job, I'd also have saved some of my money.



Buddy, you're looking at it all wrong.
You won't be competing with other 23 year olds. You'll be competing with every single musician of every single age. Trust me, a degree in marketing will do you more good in the music industry than 3 years of playing dive bars. 99% of the guys you will be competing with will have no idea how to sell a product, but you will. And that's exactly what your music is: a product. You will also know how to read a contract and avoid being screwed, which happens frequently in the music industry.
#18
^ what he said

you wont be competing against 23 year olds because your 23, this isnt some class in school where you only compete against people in the same year as you, and how old you are doesnt matter, Michael Angelo Batio destroyed his guitar teacher by the time he was 12, age has nothing to do with skill
Gear:

Jackson RR-3 Eerie Desert Swirl
Alden Warlord Guitar+Bass
Encore Strat
KTone Alpine White 6/12 Double Neck SG
Digitech RP500
Kustom Amp KGA16R

And A Bunch Of Other Stuff
#19
I say just go full steam if you want to make a living off of it. My band has been together for about 2 and 1/2 years and we only make like 400 bucks(if even). But you have to give everyone in the band a job. The other guitarist and drummer in my band are both in great shape so they rip the set down and load ****, our bass player will talk with the owner of the club and get our pay and ask them what they thought. I'll run around and give out cd's(a few free ones at first, then start charging). Having something to fall back on is always good, I choose not to I have a job as a guitar teacher that pays the bills but yeah do what you feel is best.
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MIA Fender Stratocaster
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#20
well everyone wants me to become something golf related becuz that has always been my passion since day one until i picked up a guitar. and now my golf has slipped and ik i will gte no back up when it comes to a music career so im left with nothing really to look forward too from here...
#21
atleast you have a year left to figure it out lol.

I just turned 18 and am graduating in a 3 months. Do i want to go to college, no, do i want a normal job, no.

I like to play music and work on cars, so you know what im doing?

Im going to a tech school for free, learn more about cars, mechanical engineering and business, only have classes 3 days a week for 6 hours a day and play gigs in the evening now.

And im planning to play at bars and down at the beach for the rest of my life, and hopefully open my own repair shop one day. But you know what i'll be doing what i love.

If money is important to you, by all means go and try to get a 6 figure job, by working your ass off and piling on debt by going to college.

If you want to do what you love don't let anyone tell you otherwise, people and i hate to say it most of our parents, are caught in the rat race of money, doing something they hate, and have gave up on their dreams, they know nothing else but going to work everyday and making money, they don't realize they could be doing something they love instead.
#22
Quote by koslack

You won't be competing with other 23 year olds. You'll be competing with every single musician of every single age. Trust me, a degree in marketing will do you more good in the music industry than 3 years of playing dive bars. 99% of the guys you will be competing with will have no idea how to sell a product, but you will. And that's exactly what your music is: a product. You will also know how to read a contract and avoid being screwed, which happens frequently in the music industry.


Zing! Yep. Too many people don't realize that, even as an indie band, they aren't just competing with the other indie bands in their town. Ultimately, your money comes from the paying public - whether it be door cover charges, tickets, merch, discs, etc. You have to get them away from their couch so they're going to your gig instead of watching CSI or Survivor, and they're going to see you.... and they're going to buy YOUR CD instead of the CD by Green Day or Celine Dion. You are entering the mainstream cultural marketplace.

That aside.... this from a 38-year old who was in your same shoes back many moons ago....


First: You have no pretenses of being a rock star. That's fine. Do you know what it's like to be a full-time musician? I mean... *really* know?

Here is something I posted in another thread:

There can be really decent money in playing gigs. It's a tough road, though, full of balancing business with pleasure. Weddings and corporate gigs pay really well. You'll walk out of there with a few hundred in your pocket for only a few hours work - exactly what you're describing. Problem is.... how many hours do you work in a week? Solution = hustle, hustle, hustle.... you've got to be out there pounding away to get those gigs.

Of course, weddings are generally only on weekends. If you're really, really, really lucky you can round out your week with corporate events. Problem#2 is..... you want to play Disturbed, not Neil Diamond. Solution = suck it up. Don't bite the hand that feeds. You know what side your bread is buttered on. Some people call it selling out. Professional musicians call it making a living. Smile and sing along.... "Sweeee-eeet Car-o-liiiine.... ba DA-ba-ba...." Sure, don't laugh all the way to the bank, but at least all the way to the grocery store. Geez.... that's still only a few gigs a week. Sounds sweet as a teenager, but eventually you have to take on the real world. "when you're an adult, it's no cliche.... it's the truth..." (go ahead... identify that quote... )

So how do you round it out....well.... If you go to school for music and get a classical background, you can open yourself up for solo/duo gigs outside of your wedding band for other functions, corporate events, etc. People will hire a classical guitarist for whatever. Since there's nobody to share the money with, you do okay. Of course.... still no Disturbed. You're still sucking it up playing some version of Hotel California 'by request' (or even not....) right along side your Sor, Tarrega, Dowland, etc. That gives you a couple more shows.... but you still need a 'real job' as an adult - that is, one that pays for rent/mortgage, food, car, etc.

The poverty line for a family of four in the USA (I'm not American either, but they provide a handy bench mark) is $21, 200. For an individual, it is $10 400. That's about a thousand a month... just to live above the poverty line. Another point of comparison... take an average city.... Cleveland Ohio. Rent for an average apartment seems to be about $600. Then food, phone, insurance, gas, hydro, internet, spending, etc. Yikes.

So wadda ya do? Well... you can rent yourself out to bands as a hired guy. Need a guitarist? I'm your guy! I'll do it for $XXX. Artistic freedom? Nope. Now you're totally selling your soul. More Sweet Caroline. Maybe some Shania Twain or Dwight Yokum. Maybe some Bob Seger and Tom Petty. Who knows, really? Of course, you have to be able to sit down and learn these tunes on very short notice, and know them well enough to gig on them with one rehearsal if you're lucky.

Of course, you can't always count on those. Take on a few students (remember that hustle thing?) to help round things out. So, now you're above the poverty line. You've got sporadic hours that seem to pretty reliably fill up your evenings and weekends, and see you working quite late. At least you get to sleep in. Or not. Because tomorrow you have to learn some Green Day and Blink 182 and U2 for a cover band on Friday, and you don't have all day because some kid is coming over at 4:30 for his lesson and another at 5:30, and then you have to eat and start getting ready to head out for your gigs. And then at some point, you have your OWN kids and family to work into that crazy schedule!! (of course, with the screwed up hours you keep, you may wind up being single for the rest of your natural life... "Wanna go on a date? How's Tuesday afternoon for you?"..... another career hazard!)

Still sound like fun? If it does, you have what it takes to be a professional musician. If it sounds pretty crappy, then..... keep music as a hobby. Or incorporate it into some other career path. (that's what I did....)


My choice was to take music in university as a means towards a teaching job in the public school system. Careful, now... do NOT go into teaching unless you really feel called to do it. It will eat you alive otherwise. However, I get a good salary, a great pension, great benefits, holidays, etc... and best of all, I love my job. I'm NOT one of those people that others have described. Yes, it IS all about choices and taking charge of your own fate.

The luxury I have now is that I get to make music on my terms... because I want to. I am in complete control of my musical activities, because I don't depend on it for a living.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#23
thing is, have you heard of a little band called Motorhead... maybe you have... for years they were struggling, Overkill, Ace Of Spades, all this had been written and were instant hits, and they were still struggling, for years nobody would even put them on in england so they had to go elsewhere in the world, only in the past 10 or 15 years have they been actually living free off the band

basically, im not trying to scare you or change your mind, im just trying to tell you that even the biggest bands have had to either suck dick with a mainstream record company and play all the music they want and nothing of your own, or claw your way up from the very bottom with little help until you make the companies see that you are in control of them
Gear:

Jackson RR-3 Eerie Desert Swirl
Alden Warlord Guitar+Bass
Encore Strat
KTone Alpine White 6/12 Double Neck SG
Digitech RP500
Kustom Amp KGA16R

And A Bunch Of Other Stuff
#24
I can't confirm, but I once heard that Kirk Hammett worked at a fast-food joint during the making of the black album.

On a similar note, Soulja Boy apparently went through his entire first tour by way of an old winnebago, and he's luckier than most. Most bands sleep in a passenger van of some sort, though around here it's not uncommon to see a short bus or two. (buses are obscenely cheap for some reason)

My point is that band life may not be what you think. That doesn't mean that it's bad, or that it won't get better, but you have to really want to do something like that. I plan to have a go at it myself, but I know it's not a permanent thing. I'm planning to fork as an audio engineer once my gigging days are up.
Nope, no sig here.
#25
Most musicians have a 'main' job. Like Bruce Dickinson, he is a Pilot and sure he could survive just by making music but he still is a pilot - with his own Iron Maiden Air Plane.


I myself am working on becoming both a musician and when I get to the certain point in school I will start learning, computer programming and I am also learning about studios in my free-time
"Fly with me forever high
And with these wings
We'll set the world on fire
Fly with me through scorching skies
You and I - The lie of lies"

-Symphony X
#26
One thing I'll add here is that, here is what happens with pursuing a career "to fall back on" via the college route:

You meet tons of girls. You meet a girl that you like best out of all of them. (for me, it was a couple years after university, but whatevs) You finish school. Inevitably, you find yourself with a girl, a job ticket into a career, and a girl who wants to get married.... and so do you. And you have the means to make money and start enjoying things. So you take that job that you've worked hard to get.

Music really does become something that you do in your spare time. You still have to make it a priority, or else you will have no spare time in which to justify making music, and then it gets forgotten. If you make it a priority (and make sure your partner is supportive of your music), then you can make it work. Because you're not always going to have very much spare time - especially when kids come... unless you make time to do it.

I know all this seems light-years away, but it comes a heck of a lot faster than you think it will. Trust me.... I spent a few years laughing about someone who said, when I was 23, that "30 is just around the corner." And after what seemed like only a couple of years, it became eerily UNfunny.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#27
Quote by axemanchris
One thing I'll add here is that, here is what happens with pursuing a career "to fall back on" via the college route:

You meet tons of girls. You meet a girl that you like best out of all of them. (for me, it was a couple years after university, but whatevs) You finish school. Inevitably, you find yourself with a girl, a job ticket into a career, and a girl who wants to get married.... and so do you. And you have the means to make money and start enjoying things. So you take that job that you've worked hard to get.

Music really does become something that you do in your spare time. You still have to make it a priority, or else you will have no spare time in which to justify making music, and then it gets forgotten. If you make it a priority (and make sure your partner is supportive of your music), then you can make it work. Because you're not always going to have very much spare time - especially when kids come... unless you make time to do it.

I know all this seems light-years away, but it comes a heck of a lot faster than you think it will. Trust me.... I spent a few years laughing about someone who said, when I was 23, that "30 is just around the corner." And after what seemed like only a couple of years, it became eerily UNfunny.

CT


thats only saying that the girl you meet doesnt become part of your band [see Paul Gilbert] because its not uncommon

im not saying your wrong though, you are very right in most ways, its just not 100% that will happen
Gear:

Jackson RR-3 Eerie Desert Swirl
Alden Warlord Guitar+Bass
Encore Strat
KTone Alpine White 6/12 Double Neck SG
Digitech RP500
Kustom Amp KGA16R

And A Bunch Of Other Stuff
#28
I had this choice at the end of high school, to go to University or dedicate myself to guitar. Long story short, I went to university. I want security for the future, and more importantly, money to buy more musical stuff.

Granted guitarists my age whom dedicated themselves completely are much more skilled, competent guitarists than myself, however I'll be in a position to buy my dream gear just after I graduate from Law school in 3 months.

During my university degree I've still had enough time to be the guitarist for multiple bands, and had a lot of fun along the way. Unfortuanately auditions for more "professional" bands lead to me being denied at the 2nd audition for one of those "dedicated" guitarists, but I'm happy as I am, as a guitarist and a future lawyer.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#29
Quote by koslack
Buddy, you're looking at it all wrong.
You won't be competing with other 23 year olds. You'll be competing with every single musician of every single age. Trust me, a degree in marketing will do you more good in the music industry than 3 years of playing dive bars. 99% of the guys you will be competing with will have no idea how to sell a product, but you will. And that's exactly what your music is: a product. You will also know how to read a contract and avoid being screwed, which happens frequently in the music industry.


it's this kind of sad truth that's the reason i'm not interested in doing music profesionally
#30
I think in the world of musicianship, it's always good to have a backup plan. Go under the assumption you'll never make it big. Like I'm going to college and getting something probably with computer repairs, or something tech related, because they make some pretty mice money from what I've seen, but I still I have a while to decide and get my band jumpstarted. We'll see then, won't we?
#31
I think if you have hopes of making a career in music, you'd best make that your plan. If you get a big fat record deal and get famous, then awesome. If not, you're still following the course you've planned for - to be a professional musician.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#32
I plan on going to school for music actually... get a preformance degree and minor in music business. I figure, with a good amount of knowledge of actual preformance and the ability to create music on a higher level, combined wtih a deep understanding of the buinsess, I will have an edge on competition and be able to create and synthesize ideas at a quicker pace than others. I will also be able to meet those studying in other fields and get connctions with others looking to do projects outside my field so I can utilize different aspects of the business and hopefully, achieve my dreams. As of now, my band is making great progress and are workign on a new record. If my band has found management and is really picking up before than, than I would **** it and go on tour.

That and my family is incrediably short on cash for me to even pay for college
Last edited by Highwaytohell at Mar 20, 2009,
#34
Quote by Rave765
I'm 17 and I have no idea what to do with my life.

Ain't it a bastard? By the time anyone has gained enough experience to know exactly what they wanna do with their lives, they've already wasted a load of their life in persuit of finding out what they wanna do with their lives.

The answer? Do everything that interests you to the best of your ability.
#35
Some people also forget that it's less of a lottery than it is a fact of how good you are. If you suck, it doesn't matter how many labels and promoters you play for. But if you are good and do everything D.I.Y, eventually you will get a fanbase and your name will be heard.
#36
Are you going to give up before you even try?
Anyway don't let the options of your family get in the way your dream.
You have control of where you go next with your life, don't give that power away to others.
#37
why don't you just form a band in college and do all the stuff necessary whatever it maybe in your certain situation but also establish a fall back so that when you get out of college you'll be all ready to go in the music business and if it doesn't work out you have your back up set for you also
#38
dude, honestly with my experience in the music industry, it matters more about how much money you have then how much talent you have

my band has talked with a few record companys, and they wanted SO much guarunteed from us each month to start off. ranging from 17-21, we really dont have all that much money. and to tour takes gas money, which you can get from selling cds and other merch. BUT you have to have the money to pay for the cds and printing and t-shirts and all that jazz. really, its all about money and unless youre willing to spend a good 80% of your earnings on your band then id say keep it as a hobby.

but if its meant to happen, it will.
people always get what they deserve bro.
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#39
That's the great thing about life, it's YOUR life. Unfortunately, your folks may not be as supportive of a music career as a doctorate degree, but in the end you ultimately choose your own path. My advice would be to take the medium, go to a music school, that way you're getting an education in music and will actually have credentials to find a music related job, such as a session musician, guitar tech, teacher, etc - all the while playing in bands and writing your own material. This is probably one of the safest routes, with the alternative being to get a job that is attainable now and stay there until something bigger happens to you, but the music industry is extremely tough to break into, and perhaps depends more on who you know and luck of the draw, rather than raw talent.

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#40
Quote by Mike1109
That's the great thing about life, it's YOUR life. Unfortunately, your folks may not be as supportive of a music career as a doctorate degree, but in the end you ultimately choose your own path. My advice would be to take the medium, go to a music school, that way you're getting an education in music and will actually have credentials to find a music related job, such as a session musician, guitar tech, teacher, etc - all the while playing in bands and writing your own material.

Agreed, a business course would also be very useful.
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