#1
...finish rosewood with lacquer? Perhaps a dumb question, but I saw someone post on here that you can't since it's too oily, which I thought was wrong, but then someone else agreed with him, and now I'm all


Anyone know the answer?


::turns on flame shield just in case this is a retarded question::
#2
Well you can but you dont need to,

you have to remove the oil before applying the finish (in quick succession or more oil will move to the surface)


If I was making a neck or something out of rosewood I would probably apply a finish to it, as I would like a little more than natural oil protecting it from the moisture in the air.




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Last edited by Absent Mind at Mar 2, 2009,
#3
Quote by Absent Mind
Well you can but you dont need to,

you have to remove the oil before applying the finish (in quick succession or more oil will move to the surface)


If I was making a neck or something out of rosewood I would probably apply a finish to it, as I would like a little more than natural oil protecting it from the moisture in the air.



So I have to remove the oil right before shooting the first coat of sanding sealer/lacquer? What solvent do I remove the oil with?
#4
Wipe the surface down with a fast evaporating solvent, like naptha, and then spray your first coat

Naptha thins wax oil and varnish so it should be ok to wipe over a coat of lacquer (although I would check that on scrap) so after your first coat, particularly on porous wood, I would probably wipe down the surface again before spraying another coat until you have enough finish on the wood that you no its completely covered and that the lacquer is sticking to the previous coat of lacquer not to the wood.




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Absent Mind is, as usual, completely correct.

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#5
I've heard naptha is bad for woods because it saturates the wood and evaporates, but that was under the circumstances that it would be directly exposed to air afterwards.
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Shwiggity.
#6
What do you mean that it saturates the wood? and why is that a problem?

Its not water, it wont be sucked into the grain and raise it, it just evapourates off quickly, I doubt it will open pores or anything.




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Absent Mind, words cant express how much i love you. Id bone you, oh yea.

Quote by lumberjack
Absent Mind is, as usual, completely correct.

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Id like to make my love for Neil public knowledge as he is a beautiful man
#7
I've just heard that it seeps into the pores and evaporates, and this reaction just dehydrates the wood and makes it crack.
------

Shwiggity.
#8
Well I dont know either way, but if it dehydrated wood, wouldnt we use it for drying purposes as opposed to kiln drying?

Also you build guitars using already dry wood, 6-8% moisture content I dont think a quick thin layer of naptha will drastically reduce that to cracking levels.


I'm no expert so as said, I dont know either way, but I havent heard of wiping with naptha being a problem.




Quote by dogismycopilot
Absent Mind, words cant express how much i love you. Id bone you, oh yea.

Quote by lumberjack
Absent Mind is, as usual, completely correct.

Quote by littlemurph7976
Id like to make my love for Neil public knowledge as he is a beautiful man