#1
just when i think ive figured out some of the basic blues stuff i pick up the guitar and get confused.

take a blues, standard shape:


5-----8
5-6-7
5---7
5---7-8
5-----8
5-----8

right, so the "blues" note there is a b3rd from the A major scale, which is an A sharp. But the A minor blues is the F sharp major blues, right, so in my head the b3rd should actually be a b3rd from the F sharp maj scale , which is A sharp, but its already present.

Can anyone see where my confusion comes from and how to resolve it?


EDIT: its not a 7 string. sorry.
EDIT: 3rd of F sharp is A sharp, not A
Last edited by schmintan at Mar 3, 2009,
#3
F#major = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = F# G# A# B C# D# E#
where's that A you said is already present?

EDIT: oh and how does the Am blues = F#major blues? I don't really understand that part.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 3, 2009,
#5
Standard blues shape is based off minor pentatonic right?

1 b3 4 b5 5 b7 = basic minor blues scale.

So the relative major would be off the b3 of the given minor right? (Just like the normal major/minor relationship).
So the relative major would be like a pentatonic with an added flat third 1 2 b3 3 5 6

So in Am it would be Am and C.
Am blues = A C D Eb E Gb
C major blues = C D Eb E Gb A

But the relationship in A and F# would be F#minor and A major
F#minor blues = F# A B C C# E
A major blues = A B C C# E F#

I don't know that this is how the major blues works but this is how major minor relative relationships work.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 3, 2009,
#6
F# Major blues is 1 2 b3 4 b5 6 b7 or F# G# A B C D# E

F# Major is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 or F# G# A# B C# D# E#

The blue note is a flattened third, flattened fifth, and flattened seventh.


And F# Major's relative minor is D# minor, not A minor. The relative minor is always the 6th degree of the Major scale.


Hope that helps.


-g13
Last edited by gothikchile13 at Mar 3, 2009,
#7
Quote by 20Tigers

So in Am it would be Am and C.
Am blues = A C D Eb E Gb
C major blues = C D Eb E Gb A



crap, your correct, my post is full of rubbish. ok, so Am blues = C maj blues.

and blues has a b5th added to the pent. so a b5th for C maj is F sharp, yet in the A blues has a D sharp.

the only place i can actually find the Dsharp thats added to Am blues ,is by using the A maj scale, but that brings me to the F sharp minor scale and thus confusion.
#8
Quote by schmintan

the only place i can actually find the Dsharp thats added to Am blues ,is by using the A maj scale, but that brings me to the F sharp minor scale and thus confusion.


It think I see your issue. It seems that you're looking at the blue note as part of the Major scale, it's not really. It's more or less a chromatic note added for flavor.

-g13
#9
and blues has a b5th added to the pent. so a b5th for C maj is F sharp, yet in the A blues has a D sharp.


So what's the problem? D# (actually Eb) is the b5 in A minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by schmintan
crap, your correct, my post is full of rubbish. ok, so Am blues = C maj blues.

and blues has a b5th added to the minor pent. so a b5th for C maj is G flat, yet in the A blues has a E flat.

the only place i can actually find the E flat thats added to Am blues ,is by using the A maj scale, but that brings me to the F sharp minor scale and thus confusion.
^see changes Blues is a b5 added to a minor pentatonic. In the relative major this would be the equivalent of adding a b3. So in Am it's an added E flat (adding a D# would be adding a sharp fourth) so in C major Eb would be an added b3. For a Cm blues you would take the Cm pent and add Gb.

There's lots of different versions of the blues scale. The most common though is the Minor Pent with an added b5.

When using a major chord the b3 is commonly added and the 7 is often replaced with the b7 - kind of like "mixolydian add b3" (like in Love Me Two Times)

You don't have to find the added note in another scale. In fact you won't find it in a relative scale since it's an added note for flavour. The basic blues scale is just a minor pentatonic with an added b5.

Play around with this in Em:
D- b7|---|-R-|---|---|b3-|---|-4-|---|
A-  4|b5-|-5-|---|---|b7-|---|-R-|---|
E-  R|---|---|b3-|---|-4-|b5-|-5-|---|
    ^          ^               ^
    Open       3rd Fret        7th fret

or in Am:
G- b7|---|-R-|---|---|b3-|---|-4-|---|
D-  4|b5-|-5-|---|---|b7-|---|-R-|---|
A-  R|---|---|b3-|---|-4-|b5-|-5-|---|
E-  5|---|---|b7-|---|-R-|---|---|b3-|
    ^          ^               ^
    Open       3rd Fret        7th fret


Many great riffs were based on this scale (in Em Roadhouse Blues, in Am Heartbreaker are two that spring to mind.)
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 3, 2009,