#1
This used to be really straightforward and simple for me, but after ages of quitting lessons, branching off from my classical guitar beginnings, half-hearted playing or even no playing at all, I now find it basically impossible to answer the otherwise-numberical question "how long have you been playing for?"

I guess that's the good thing about constant playing; you know exactly how long you've been going for, and you haven't wasted any time bludging or off doing other things and neglecting music. It's the same for composing as well, actually. I used to be unbelievably into that stuff, but sometimes I would go through spurts where I would sit at the computer with music recordings programs and stuff for hours on end, and others where I would do a little bit or nothing at all. Thus, if I were to be asked how long I've been trying to compose for, I would seriously have no idea how to go about answering it. I mean, I could make up an approximate number, but I wonder if it would mean anything.

Is how long you've played for that important? It is, after all, an indication of perhaps where you should be at, level-wise. However, everyone has different levels of dedication. What's kind of irritating, I suppose, is how 1 month of half-assed playing is pretty much equivalent to 1 month of rigorous 6-hour work-outs. After all, in the end, both have played for 1 month. It's just the less committed one who's lost out.

Anyway, that ends my random and somewhat pointless rant. I'm guessing that by the laws of reverse psychology, someone's going to be a prick and ask how long I've been playing for. Well, honestly, I really don't know any more.
#2
I've been playing pretty constantly over the last several years and I can't remember how long I've been playing (give or take about a year sort of thing), so I understand your problem.
It doesn't really matter though does it?



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Last edited by Imperial Throg at Mar 3, 2009,
#3
Seriously? How long have you been playing guitar is the hardest question in life for you?

Wow.

Alrighty then.
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#4
Use the expression "on and off for XX years" where XX is when you first started till now.
Moving on.....
#5
Rhetorical questions ahead;

Since you used the word reverse psychology I will use it (sarcastically which also links with the sarcasm of "asking how long you play") to explain it;


If you listen to a song, and you like it, do you look up on wiki how long the artist in question has been playing?

No

If you do check and he played for 50 years, would you find the song ****tier in some way?

No

It doesn't matter how long you play.

Sure you have people who go like z0mg he wrote that when he was 15 amazing. But those are people who are about 12-15 years old who are in a phase of life where they explore everything and just can't objectively handle how big the world is + it's "wonders".

At the end of the day, if you make a song that people like, they will listen to it no matter how long you play.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 3, 2009,
#6
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Rhetorical questions ahead;

Since you used the word reverse psychology I will use it (sarcastically which also links with the sarcasm of "asking how long you play") to explain it;


If you listen to a song, and you like it, do you look up on wiki how long the artist in question has been playing?

No

If you do check and he played for 50 years, would you find the song ****tier in some way?

No

It doesn't matter how long you play.

Sure you have people who go like z0mg he wrote that when he was 15 amazing. But those are people who are about 12-15 years old who are in a phase of life where they explore everything and just can't objectively handle how big the world is + it's "wonders".

At the end of the day, if you make a song that people like, they will listen to it no matter how long you play.

I disagree with you on one point, when people are like "z0mg he wrote that when he was 15 amazing." It doesn't make them like the song more, it's just shocking that someone so young can write something so awesome.
Personally I'm always stunned and a little downhearted when I listen to IneartheD's stuff and realize that Laiho wrote better music than I do when he was 14.

Duration of playing, in my opinion, is more a way to measure where you should/could be at musically. For instance if I've played 3 years and I listen to someone that's also played 3 years and is better than me, then I think "I should be at that level.. If only I'd practiced harder". Sometimes it takes seeing other people do better than you to give you a kick up the ass to do something to improve.
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#7
Darren has officially kicked this threads ass.

As for the kids being amazing thing, why do you need someone to be better than you to strive to be your best, wouldn't you want to do that anyways?
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#8
Quote by The_Sophist
Darren has officially kicked this threads ass.

As for the kids being amazing thing, why do you need someone to be better than you to strive to be your best, wouldn't you want to do that anyways?

Of course, but it shows what you can do with practice and makes the goal seem so much more attainable.
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#9
I hear ya. People seem to think nature talent has something to do with someone becoming great, which is a load of ****. Steve Vai didn't become Steve Vai because he was naturally good, he become Steve Vai because he practised all day.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
I loved Darren's answer.

One thing I'll add is this... the longer you play, the longer you are likelier to play. You've stuck with it. That suggests a certain amount of success on some level - otherwise you would have dropped out with the rest of the pack somewhere between landing your first girlfriend and finishing college. Two years? Could just be a phase. Twenty years? This person is committed to music, the instrument, and loves doing it.

I think hard work describes the difference between most people. In hockey, it would be the difference between some no-name player and a guy like Darryl Sittler. But what about guys like Rocket Richard and Wayne Gretzky? I think there is a magic line where hard work just doesn't explain it. What about Bach? Did he get there just through hard work? Nope. Oh, sure, he probably worked like a dog.... but man..... he had a little something extra.

CT
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#11
Quote by LeperAffinity
I disagree with you on one point, when people are like "z0mg he wrote that when he was 15 amazing." It doesn't make them like the song more, it's just shocking that someone so young can write something so awesome.
Personally I'm always stunned and a little downhearted when I listen to IneartheD's stuff and realize that Laiho wrote better music than I do when he was 14.

Duration of playing, in my opinion, is more a way to measure where you should/could be at musically. For instance if I've played 3 years and I listen to someone that's also played 3 years and is better than me, then I think "I should be at that level.. If only I'd practiced harder". Sometimes it takes seeing other people do better than you to give you a kick up the ass to do something to improve.

]

Ur right, what I mean is, alot of the younger people like the songs because of it's amazement rather then it's musical composition.

take for instance people that can play chromatic licks at triplet 16th at 220bpm (or some **** like that ), they often get 5 stars on youtube, but really would you listen to that if you were chilling out with ur mates on friday night or something?

Most likely not

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??