#1
So, I've been kind of curious if there's a way to improve the sustain on my Jackson DK2M. I feel like it could use just a little bit more. And I'm thinking one of these areas would be the problem..

- The pickups? (JB/Jazz)
- Bolt-on neck?
- The licensed trem?

Is it that? Or does it maybe just need a good set-up?
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#2
um...

I've heard that loosening the bolt screws a turn and then retightening helps sustain.

#1 thing I'd try is lowering your pickups some...too high = very bad for sustain.
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#3
A floating trem and a bolt on neck is a not a recipe for great sustain. That being said, a lot of sustain has to do with technique. You could get a heavier block for you trem, supposed to do wonder for floating trems. Putting some weight on the headstock helps as well.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#4
Yeah, I figured the bolt-on neck/trem combo would be most of it, lol.

DLrocket89, the pickups are already about as far as from the strings as they should be (any lower would be too low). I've learned that giving them some room to breathe is ideal unless you like the infamous wolf tone

Since I still sound like a n00b when trying to describe/name floyd parts,what exactly am I changing when I put in a new block? do I open up the back plate of the guitar where the springs are? or is it something on the bridge itself?
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#5
It's the part that the springs connect to. I know for a strat style trem you need to remove the saddles to get to the screws that hold it in, probably similar on a floyd.

It's not just that it's a bolt on, it just seems most bolt ons are of light weight wood, which isn't great for sustain. Mass=sustain You just have to figure out how to get more mass in the guitar.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#6
Not to take away from what Kevin is saying because I've learned a lot from him myself but I personally feel like I get oooodles of sustain from my floating vintage trem, bolt on neck and light weight wood.

Are the pups you listed the stock pups?

Also check/ask in the Guitar Set Up QnA sticky and the FR set up sticky over in EG.
#7
Removing the saddles? sounds like another project, lol

And yes, the JB/Jazz setup is stock. I definitely want to change the Jazz (Great cleans, doesn't handle high gain very well), but have debated about whether I want to change the JB or not (I find changing amps made a big difference). But I'm thinking the sustain issue is more related to the guitar construction than it is the pickups.

Sometimes I feel like the body on the guitar is pretty light, but that the bolt-on neck actually seems quite sturdy and well built. If it helps, it's a maple fretboard and alder body.
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#8
you can actually get just as much sustain from a bolt on as from a set neck. this is of course dependent of the fact that the neck pocket and neck heel are well done and the neck is tightly bolted down. so thats not always going to be the problem.

basicly the best thing to do would be to just run an overall setup for now. check your pickup height (you said its good), the tightness and solidness of neck joint, check the nut, and check the bridge. it may be that your bridge isnt a good copy, so it could have a bad block (thats the thing in the back that the springs attach to) or just loses a lot of string vibration where it connects to the body. just check that everything is optimally set up and see if that helps, then look at getting a new bridge or something.