#1
I am currently trying to learn and memorize scales and I wanted to know if anybody knew some ways on memorizing them, so when you're improvizing you know what notes to play already.
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#2
First, let's take a simple, commonly used scale; the A minor Pentatonic scale.

e---5---8----
b---5---8----
g---5---7----
d---5---7----
a---5---7----
E---5---8----


An easy way to memorize this would be to start with 3 notes, and to "cycle" them, like this

a-------5--------5-------5--
E---5-8--8-5-8--8-5-8----

Once you're sure that you have those 3 notes memorized, add the next note. Continue doing this until you've got all 12 notes down. GO SLOWLY.
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#3
I'm a beginner guitar player when it comes to music theory, scales & stuff, so take my advice at your own risk.

To learn to improvise over a scale or a mode I first practice the scale/mode over the entire fretboard, probably a couple of hours. Then I create a pedal tone for the root of my scale. I let the pedal tone run in the background on my pc & then start improvising over the pedal tone. After ever minute or when I feel a resolution or a tension in the improvisation, I pause for a moment & try to speak out the note that I'm at. My whole improvisation exercise is generally fun & keeps me hooked onto learning more.

HTH
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#4
I believe you can never improvise over a scale unless you know the scale inside out. The only scale i can do this on is the E blues scale. I know other scales, but not well enough to improvise over them - well i can, it just sounds like ****
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#5
memorize the shape it creates on the fretboard then improvise on it at a slow tempo. Start with a few notes then add more just like Seth's daddy mentioned.

if you can't improvise with just a few notes then learn some riffs or songs to get the feel of a rhythm in your fingers.
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Last edited by allislost at Mar 4, 2009,
#6
I like to start with the most important notes, root 3rd and 5th, then work my way on from there.
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#7
Quote by Carrothead 73
I am currently trying to learn and memorize scales and I wanted to know if anybody knew some ways on memorizing them, so when you're improvizing you know what notes to play already.



Practice them when you wake up, whilst your doing your main practice (set maybe about 30 mins aside for this) and before you go to bed. dont worry about speed just memorise the positions. Try and learn one new shape a day, thats your target learning speed.
#8
Quote by Voodoo Star
I'm a beginner guitar player when it comes to music theory, scales & stuff, so take my advice at your own risk.

To learn to improvise over a scale or a mode I first practice the scale/mode over the entire fretboard, probably a couple of hours. Then I create a pedal tone for the root of my scale. I let the pedal tone run in the background on my pc & then start improvising over the pedal tone. After ever minute or when I feel a resolution or a tension in the improvisation, I pause for a moment & try to speak out the note that I'm at. My whole improvisation exercise is generally fun & keeps me hooked onto learning more.

HTH

Brilliant advice.

TS, make sure you never lose sight of WHY you learn scales. They aren't domething you play , they're something you use to construct music from. That being the case understanding the sounds the scale creates and how and when it can be used are arguably more important than where you put your fingers
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
Brilliant advice.

TS, make sure you never lose sight of WHY you learn scales.



^^ good one.

I think if you learn about the theory of intervals (major 3rd, minor 3rd, dominant 7th etc.), it will make it easier to understand how scales and modes work. This way you can construct any of them everywhere on the fret board.