#1
I've been playing guitar for about 11 months now and I'm a little confused. What does it mean to "play/solo over a chord?" For example what chords would you use if you were playing minor pentatonic in the key of A? And how do you know what chords to use? How do the chords and the key that you solo in correspond?
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#2
If you have a scale, like for example the A minor pentatonic scale, consider what notes make up that scale.

We've got A, C, D, E and G.

Those are gunna be the only notes you're going to play if you want to keep strictly to that scale when soloing. To figure out what chords will suit the scale the best, consider the nature of a chord; a series of notes put together that are sounded at the same time. Take a look at your five notes and see the range of chords they can make by combining them with eachother - just by taking a quick glance I can see that you can make Am and C, but to be honest you can use chords from the A Aeolian scale, and still solo over it with just the pentatonics. I've stayed up all night so I really can't be bothered explaining why, but you just can. Am, Bdim, C, Dm, Em, F, G.
lolburger
#3
I know almost no music theory so could you dumb that down a bit?
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#4
Playing the changes is when you follow each chord in a progression with a certain scale/mode.

and go read the crusades for more info
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Last edited by allislost at Mar 4, 2009,
#5
When you are soloing over chords, you are following notes that follow the chord changes. For instance, take a basic song like "Happy Birthday" in the key of C major. When you are soloing over the chords, you would emphasize the notes of the C major triad (C, E, G) until the chord changes. When the chords change to F or G, you would emphasize the same respective notes for that chord. F, A, C for the F chord. G, B, D for the G chord. That doesn't mean those are the ONLY notes you can play, it just means at places you want to emphasize the melody, maybe like downbeats or at the chord changes, you play those notes. Try playing it only with the F chord shape. Start at the eighth fret, finger an F, and slowly pick the notes. Slide down to the thirteenth fret for the F or the fifteenth fret for the G chord.

That's a bit impractical, it would be easier to finger an F shape at the eight fret (which is actually a C chord), and finger an A chord at the tenth and twelvth fret for the changes, but nothing is absolute. Try reading up on the "CAGED" system on here. Contrary to popular belief, its not a method, its an acronym. Chords follow those "shapes" as you work your way up the fretboard. For instance, a C chord in the open position. Another C chord at the third fret if you play an A chord shape. Slide down to the fifth fret, play a G shape, it's a C chord too. The pattern repeats.
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#6
A normal triad chord is R,3,5, right?
So take C major - C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C
Any diatonic chords in C Maj have to be made up of notes from the C Maj scale
Root Chord is a major chord, as C, E, G is 1,3,5
2nd chord is minor, as D, F, A is 1,b3,5
etc

So the chords you get from the C Maj scale (diatonically) are
R C Maj
2 D min
3 E min
4 F Maj
5 G Maj
6 A min
7 B dim
R C Maj

And the pattern is the same for all Major scales - I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio, I

If you're soloing over a chord - do what millerdrr said

EDIT: diatonic means staying strictly in key - so basically you can only use the notes from the scale
Last edited by zhilla at Mar 4, 2009,
#7
Quote by Sheogorath
I've been playing guitar for about 11 months now and I'm a little confused. What does it mean to "play/solo over a chord?" For example what chords would you use if you were playing minor pentatonic in the key of A? And how do you know what chords to use?


First you need to realize that the song is in the key of A minor (or C major, which is the relative major of A minor).

The A minor pentatonic is just the scale you might use to solo with. "Pentatonic" just refers to a scale made from 5 notes of a "normal" 7 note scale.

The chords would be built from the A minor scale (or its relative major scale - the C major scale)

What is meant by "relative minor" or "relative major" scale is this: The two scales contain the exact same notes - and therefore, the same chords. The scales just "start" on different notes.

How do the chords and the key that you solo in correspond?


"KEY" refers to the scale that is used in the song (note that this can change during a song). The chords of the song are built using the scale. You then use notes from the same scale to play over those chords.

If you don't know about scales or how to build chords - you really need to go study that first....

Go here: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusade&w=columns and read through all the lessons. These are the "Crusade Articles" that you see everyone talking about. People talk about them for good reason.

For another good source, look here: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

Once you've read those, you should be able to answer your own question. If not, you can come back and ask more questions.
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Last edited by Guitartist at Mar 4, 2009,