#1
In my short time being part of the music scene, I have seen a lot of bands sweat and suffer and in the end get nowhere. Some, because they didn't have the knowhow. Others, because they didn't know the right people, or were in the wrong place. I myself have several songs that I have written that people enjoy. However, I have never signed a contract, mostly because, I would have no idea where to begin. That, and there are so many people out there that say that only the best make it. There are so many people that distract you from your dreams and try to impose "reality" on you. With all that in mind, I came up with an idea so that the future generation has a new look at the music industry. It is called Black Label Industries. Take a look at www.musicalink.webs.com and let me know what you think.
#2
Black Label is a skateboard company
Black label is a brand of whiskey
Black label is part of the name of Zakk Wylde's band
Black label is a lamb of god song

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#3
not too long ago i also had my thoughts about the music industriy etc.
so I think this idea is awesome!
#4
Signing a contract is pretty simple really.

The contract signing process begins with negotiations, followed by legal review, and finally closing (both parties signing the contract). I think most people get hung up on the negotations part because that is the most difficult.
#5
So is the idea to basically promote/record etc. any band that joins. What if the band isn't going to make you money? I would take a guess that the vast majority of musicians who would sign up wouldn't be 'financially viable'. Or is is some sort of non-profit organisation? Don't get me wrong, it's a good idea, but after looking at (and reading) the website's front page it just made me think of another myspace/cdbaby/facebook sort of thing.
#6
Quote by Myshadow46_2
So is the idea to basically promote/record etc. any band that joins. What if the band isn't going to make you money? I would take a guess that the vast majority of musicians who would sign up wouldn't be 'financially viable'. Or is is some sort of non-profit organisation? Don't get me wrong, it's a good idea, but after looking at (and reading) the website's front page it just made me think of another myspace/cdbaby/facebook sort of thing.


^This

Promoting a band takes money. If you don't have that money, you can't promote and your business fails. It's a simple as that. Concern for profit is not a bad thing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
There's nothing wrong with the music business.

The problem lies in tieing music to business = insta fail if you are out to get the best out of both worlds.

Rarely it happens that an artist can do his art 100% the way he wants to and also make lots of money of it.

IT doesn't matter. If you take on unknown indie bands on ur label, ur most likely going to go out of business.

The big names in the music business spend lots of money, so tour promoters and venue's will charge much just because they can.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 4, 2009,
#8
You've all got good points. It takes money. I need bands that will make me money, etc. I already understand that. The idea isn't just to take whoever off the street and throw out the fist thing they record and try to sell it. The idea is to work with these bands so that they improve to the point that they can sell a record, bring in a fan base, etc. The biggest way that they will get a fan base won't be through main stream norms. How many of you have a band you love that noone else has heard of? I have at least two or three. What my company will do is make it possible to share that interest with everyone else who is into the Black Label scene. At first records might just go to other bands who are with Black Label, and the friends of those bands. However, eventually people will hear what we are doing and take an interest.
#9
You know, the reason why most people don't 'make it' is because the record companies are very careful with who they give recording contracts to, because they want to make money. And despite this, about ninety percent of the bands that record companies sign don't do very well, and it's the ten percent that really bring up the company. And that's after they've weeded out the best of the best. Now, your idea that you are proposing is that less work is put into weeding out the best of the best, and then pump even more money into these bands? As far as the Black Label scene itself goes, I think that if people wanted to support obscure bands they could always just visit their own local music scene.
Quote by coolo
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#10
^^ that.

And the only exposure for true money is videoclips, and with the limited air time, the top labels literally own mtv's airing time, if you offer 10k to get ur clip on tv, they will offer 50k to get ur band instead if it's good, leaving you with nothing anyway.

This happens alot, and is often called selling out, but it happens, and it's only natural.

You have more chance in getting a "carreer" as band manager, looking for venue's through ur country/continent and promoting the band, using part of the income to hire independent "bedroom producers" and hire webdesigners for myspace, and maybe logo's and merchandise to sell at concerts.

If people like ur music, and you tour frequently. then in a few years you will slowly make name for urself.

This happens, you can make a living out of it if you tour enough. I toured with my old band when I was 16, and got 200 euro's for about 1 hour of performing + free drinks and free dinner.

And I wasn't even slightly known.

Touring is the way to go, it's fun, it's new experience, free travelling if ur smart with ur money and dont' act as if it's the 80's

I also often look for opportunities as I'm solo now, jamming with housebands at local bars, which is very fun to do as well.

I'm luckily able to get by in most styles 1 or another, so it's always fun, and you can learn from it.

Usually you get like free drinks the entire night and maybe a small compensation.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 7, 2009,
#11
Unfortunately, if a band doesn't have money behind them, its next to impossible to make it. The music buisness is so political. Alot of times, its what you look like, not how good you are. A few years ago, a friend of mine was in a band. Everybody in the band could sing and play. They had amazing vocal harmonies. And they wrote really good songs. Some label, (I think it was Sony, but not sure), heard their stuff and was interested. My buddy is fairly overweight. The rep took one look at him and said "sorry", we can't use you.

Here's another example; There's this local band you might have heard of, Boba Flex. Personally, I think they're horrible, but that's niether here nor there. Their label paid $50,000 to go on tour with Sevendust. I don't think it helped their career any.

But good luck with whatever you do.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#12
Quote by seth's daddy
My buddy is fairly overweight. The rep took one look at him and said "sorry", we can't use you..


It's not that I don't believe you, but reading this makes me wonder why the label didn't offer to buy/licence this band's songs so someone else on their roster who might need a song could benefit. Because really... the priorities are 1. Great songs 2. Marketability of the performers.

Quote by seth's daddy

Their label paid $50,000 to go on tour with Sevendust. I don't think it helped their career any.


But Sevendust sure appreciated it....

But seriously.... if an opportunity like that didn't help their career, the audiences clearly didn't think they were all that good. At least now they know... except it cost 'em $50K.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Every comment here is based on mainstream labels and how music has been done in the past. I don't plan to use mainstream tactics to promote underground bands. I'm not going to go to MTV and pay them to put make a video for my band, or pay $50,000 for a band to go on tour with someone "famous." I am working with and joining the local scenes to create a large independent scene. Keep in mind I'm not going through mainstream labels and companies to create records. I am creating my own company to do it all. I hope that makes sense.