#1
for example say I have "G Mixolydian" G A B C D E F G

How do I make it have a Mixolydian feel.

Are there certain progressions or notes I must use or not use??

Thanks in advance!!!
#2
Mixolydian is the the scale. So it has already the mixolydian feel.
If you play in minor-pentatonic you can only practice and find out what some good licks are in that scale

But watch out for the F - B. A diminished fifth (b5) can sound ugly, or awesome if you play it in a good way. The only difference between Gmajor and Gmixolydian is that F# becomes an F...
#3
Quote by MaXiMuse
Mixolydian is the the scale. So it has already the mixolydian feel.
If you play in minor-pentatonic you can only practice and find out what some good licks are in that scale

But watch out for the F - B. A diminished fifth (b5) can sound ugly, or awesome if you play it in a good way. The only difference between Gmajor and Gmixolydian is that F# becomes an F...


Thanks for your reply but how do you distinguish between, say, A Minor and G Mixolydian??
#4
well with the parent key of C...try refering to the root note of G... cause if you refer to F more than G you will end up sounding more Lydian... And if you refer to B more you will sound locrian... etc. etc.
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#5
The tonal center tells you which key you're playing in, if you want to write something in G mixolydian you have to revolve the progression around G
#6
Begin and end with G7 chord. If you stick to the chords using only the notes of the mode G7, Am7, Bdim, Cmaj7, Dm7, Em7, F7b5. So, the old ii-V-I would be Am7-Dm7-G7. That should sound about right. Everyone's favorite I-IV-V would be G7-Cmaj7-Dm7, though you might want to play D7 instead of Dm7, but then you're 'breaking the rules'.
Last edited by tagyoureit at Mar 4, 2009,
#7
Quote by pluckypigeon
Thanks for your reply but how do you distinguish between, say, A Minor and G Mixolydian??



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#8
Quote by tagyoureit
Everyone's favorite I-IV-V would be G7-Cmaj7-Dm7, though you might want to play D7 instead of Dm7, but then you're 'breaking the rules'.


I'd probably try to avoid Cmaj7 because of the danger of it becoming C. I know in this case it's the IV, but depending how you play over the progression could easily pull towards C rather than G.
#9
In c, (that is G Mixolydian) I try and focus on these sort of phrases:


E---------------------------------------
B---------------------------------------
G-----4-5-7-5-4-------------------------
D-3-5-----------5-3-2-------------------
A---------------------5-3-2---4---------
E---------------------------3----3-1-1h3


Add tons of vibrato and and stuff and you're off.

Hands down, most important notes are F, G and B.
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Last edited by TheBurningFish at Mar 4, 2009,
#10
G Mixolydian resolves on the G instead of the C.
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#11
Check out the link in my signature "how to make modal chord progressions" to find a explanation of how modes sound like modes, which notes "work" + video example.


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#12
Everyone's favorite I-IV-V would be G7-Cmaj7-Dm7, though you might want to play D7 instead of Dm7, but then you're 'breaking the rules'.


There are so many things wrong with this. A I7-IV-v in mixolydian is pointless for several reasons, the most obvious being that G7 does not function as a tonic, and Dm7 does not function as a dominant. Modes lack functional harmony, so stop trying to sqeeze functional harmony out of them. The progression is a ii-V7-I in C major, which is about as "C major" as you can possibly get. It couldn't be any less mixolydian.

Both of you need to read the theory sticky and the crusade articles and ignore modes for now. You lack the requisite knowledge to understand them.

In c, (that is G Mixolydian)


G mixolydian is not "C" anything.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Mar 4, 2009,
#13
^He's half right. The progression definitely resolves to C. No matter how I seem to play it the G always wants to move back to the C. It's a common progression using a chain of fifths and the weak v7 - I7 (Dm7 - G7) movement just isn't quite strong to overpower the stronger V7-Imaj7 (G7 - Cmaj7) movement tonicizing the C chord.

Why I say he's only half right. Don't listen to the part about not trying to squeeze functional harmony out of modes. There is absolutely no reason stop trying anything in music. If we stuck strictly to tradition music would never progress.

First off I would suggest a pedal G bass line. I know it's not overly exciting but it gives you a chance to really play with that Mixolydian sound.

Another option might simply be a G chord vamp.

Of course then there's the whole chord progression thing...

Instead of G7 Cmaj7 Dm7 drop the C and throw in maybe an Em or even a Bdim chord for
G Em Dm7 or G Bdim Dm7 which both resolve to G.

Or you could try a simple descending line I bVII vi v - G F Em Dm

or G Em Dm F

You could get rid of the Dm all together. G Em F

You can use pretty much any chords the only rule is that it has to resolve to G. G has to feel like it is the tonic chord and you have to listen honestly. Just saying it is because you want it to be won't cut the mustard. You must use your ears.
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 4, 2009,