#2
I hear he uses the Lydian mode alot. And I mean...A LOT.
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#3
It's more than scales and progressions. There's phrasing and technique and his creative mind and countless other elements.
#4
Quote by PLOP
I hear he uses the Lydian mode alot. And I mean...A LOT.

I think that's more Steve Vai that uses the Lydian mode excessively.

I believe he used Hungarian Minor alot in the latest album?

Edit: Be Lyle Watt
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Last edited by TheBurningFish at Mar 4, 2009,
#5
Satriani also adds in phrygian mode to little licks (very middle eastern sound)
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#6
The best way to ''get inside the head of'' a player is to transcribe their music onto paper note for note, basslines / lead guitar line / rhythm guitar line [focus on the chord progressions and how he phrases his leads over them].

If you do 10 of satch's songs in this manner I guarantee you will be able to play in his style. Then it's just technique stuff to think about after that! good luck pal
#8
Thanks a lot for all your replies.

Also extra thanks to Zanon. I now have an interesting task to do!!
#9
none of the above

scales and modes etc don't define how a player sounds. its not what they play, its how they play
#10
I would have to second the notion that his flawless technique defines his sound as opposed to what particular notes, scales or chords he chooses to play.
#12
Quote by pluckypigeon
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The best thing you can do is to learn some of his music and then answer your own question.

It's not like you're going to learn the "Satriani scale" and all of the sudden sound like him. There is more to it than that.
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#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
The best thing you can do is to learn some of his music and then answer your own question.

It's not like you're going to learn the "Satriani scale" and all of the sudden sound like him. There is more to it than that.

*cough* Enigmatic *cough*

Nah I'm kidding. You're pretty right.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#14
Satriani literally used every note set and modulation you can think of at 1 point or another.

Ask him to write a melody in Phrygian dominant and he will, ask him to do 1 in lydian and he will.

I can name dozens of characteristic Satch stuff, but then there's dozens more, and you won't sound like him.

The most general findings I made are this;

-He often focuses on pentatonic and blues like note choices in his melodies and uses non diatonic notes to venture out it, with the harmony following.

Or he makes things ambiguous by playing in 1 scale, but uses the harmony to "deceive" the tonality and use a harmonic modulation to change how the note functions (following the chords principle)

Here follow an example in the key of E Minor. (tab below)

A classic way of a satch like "mini modulation".

Notice how the note in the brackets (15th fret G string) is a blues note (b5). But see in the underlying chords how it acts as a major 3rd of a F# Major chord.


e|-12----------|-----------|
B|----12-------|-----------|
G|-------12-14-|(15)~------|
D|-------------|-----------|
A|-------------|-----------|
E|-------------|-----------|
   
   Em            F# (major)
e|-12----------|-14--------|
B|-12----------|-14--------|
G|-12----------|(15)-------|
D|-14----------|-16--------|
A|-14----------|-16--------|
E|-12----------|-14--------|

This is not from a Satch song, but it's something what he would do, and if you check out/analyse his songs, you will definitely stumble upon these kind of things.



Modulation

Another 1 is doing parallel major/minor note choice over chords and is basically a mini modulation and somewhat indirectly related to pitch axis theory;

Example (tab below);


The bass plays just root notes, and plays the notes D - G - C which if you want to make diatonic would translate to 2 - 5 - 1 in the key of C Major (Dm - G - C )

The first bar he plays a minor 3rd relative to the d note implying the chord Dm. In the 2nd bar he plays a Major 3rd relative to G implying a G Major chord, where's in the last bar he plays a Minor 3rd of C implying Cm.

Now if someone played full chords in the key of C, that note in the brackets would sound awfully misplaced, but now where the tonality is ambiguous it isn't.

Maybe this example isn't the best sounding, but I'm trying to show you how this opens note choices and is more explored in Pitch axis theory, where over a root note you can imply both major and minor.

e|---------|---------|---------|
B|-6-------|---------|(4)------|
G|---------|-4-------|---------|
D|---------|---------|---------|
A|---------|---------|---------|
E|---------|---------|---------|

   Dm        G        *Cm     (<----implied chords)
G|---------|---------|---------|
D|---------|---------|---------|
A|-5-5-5-5-|---------|-3-3-3-3-|
E|---------|-3-3-3-3-|---------|

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 4, 2009,