#1
I know basic music theory, but memorizing the fretboard has always been a pain. And i don't think i can progress much further without knowing my notes on the fretboard. Does anyone have any tips, or ways they did it?
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#2
The thing that helped me the most was becoming a proficient reader in all positions. Alot of people avoid that route because it's alot of work, but it really is effective.
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#3
I feel you really only need to learn half of the fret board, since it repeats at the 12th fret. I tend to stick to certain areas and know those areas well, but I can find my way around from there. Also, I didn't memorize the sharps and flats, just the naturals.
#4
yeah, thats what im currently doing. what kind of methods did you do? just like go note to note on each string or like for example find e on every string.
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If some emo in a moshpit hit me i swear i would break him.

Quote by greasysnowball
or if you had a cell phone that was a Razr, you should give it to him
#5
I am also in the process of memorizing the fretboard, but its hard cause I keep getting distracted.

But some things you can do are go through some intervals at all positions on the fret board. For example in the Key of C if you were doing thirds, find C and E at all positions along the fretboard. Then move to some other notes such as D and F, (ie going along the scale, or you can chose at random). Octaves are another good way to memorize, find the octave of a note in each position on the fretboard.
#6
what i've been doing is going to each note on each string.
Quote by GrEgUms1991
If some emo in a moshpit hit me i swear i would break him.

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or if you had a cell phone that was a Razr, you should give it to him
#7
try this..

learn the major scales first...ON ONE STRING at a time...use the fretmarkers as a guide

start with the high E up to the 12 fret

you will begin to see "interval patterns"

when you feel you KNOW scale ... ascending and descending

learn it on the B string...

then add the two strings together

now you see how interval patterns relate on two strings...name the notes as you play them...

add the G string etc

then begin the scale on any note of a string and you should be able to finish the scale from that point

when you have done all six strings..go to the next major key...(use the cycle of fifths as a guide...start with the key of C

Daily practice is necessary to really get this stuff under your fingers .. if you do ... three months (one major scale a week) from now you WILL know the fretboard...be determined to learn it...

play well

wolf
#8
When I was first learning to play (more or less from day 1), my friend had written all the modes in the Key of F for me to study. F Ionian, G Dorian, A Phrygian, etc. up to E Locrian. First I learned each fretboard pattern, using them primarily as finger exercises. Then, I began singing/saying the notes aloud as I played them. Finally, I would occasionally have my friend quiz me since he knew all the notes already.

I was lucky to have a mentor from the start. I doubt I would have ever given a second thought to playing an instrument had it not been for my friend's influence. For that I am forever grateful.
#11
if you go over all the notes as many times as possible in 5 min and do this every day(or even 2-3 times a day) you'll have it down in no time..
the only reason it seems difficult is because you don't need it to play..
so people either put it off or just do it every now and then..
but daily practice will get you there in no time!!

also i'm gonna agree with whoever said to learn reading in different positions..
but if your not using it for the purpose to reading sheet music and instead just for theory(scales/chords/etc) then the fastest way would be my first idea.. imo

BUT.. i must say learning to read in the positions has helped me a lot.
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#12
Learn standard notation at the same time then practise sight reading.

Not only will you develope two more very important skills, this is also a very efficient and interesting way of learning them, as opposed to the "say each note as you play it and go up and down the string".
#13
i know how to read, i just can't memorize the frets. i used to play piano.
Quote by GrEgUms1991
If some emo in a moshpit hit me i swear i would break him.

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or if you had a cell phone that was a Razr, you should give it to him
#15
Quote by mikeEVH
i know how to read, i just can't memorize the frets. i used to play piano.



It's reading on the guitar that will help you memorize the notes on the guitar.
Get a guitar method book and practice reading. (or anything actually).

It does take time though. If you're looking for shortcuts, this isn't it. This is work, but work that pays off.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 4, 2009,
#16
Look for some lessons on here about "CAGED"

Try remembering the patterns of certain key intervals. For instance, if you play a root note on the sixth string, the note directly below it on the fifth string is the fourth. Two frets down is a fifth. Drop down to the fourth string directly below the fifth, that's the octave.

------l---l-8-l----l
--4--l---l-5-l----l
--R--l---l---l----l

That shape also works starting on the fifth string. It changes a bit as you drop, but you get the idea. Look for patterns
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#17
If you learn the low E string, and you know how to play power chords, then you got the octaves already set for you on the D string. So, you'll know drop D as well. As for the A string and getting to know the low E, i guess just keep working with it. It will start to come naturally.
#18
I just study the modes (not using the CAGED method though). I'll pick a key to play in, then run through the different modes of that scale and as I do, I just say out loud the note I'm playing. This way I learn the modes and patterns of them along with the fretboard at the same time. Always liked killing 2 birds...
#19
Use the notes your trying to learn. Make up little phrases with each part of the neck, maybe two or three notes. Use these phrases as well as your basic looking at the note and thinking the name, and you'll have it in no time.
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