#1
Alright, well obviously the Behringer has more features via the expression pedals (which I'm honestly not sure I'd use anyway - we'll see what effects I end up getting), but how is it construction-wise? Is it going to die on me after a while?

Price-wise, I can get the MIDI Mate for $10 more, and since it's a Rocktron, I'd assume it's built better.


From those of you who have used one (or both), which do you prefer and why? What do you like/not like about them? etc.


P.S. I will be using this with my Randall RM4, ADA MP-1 and most likely a TC Electronics G-Major.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#2
I've read the Behringer's are really bad.
The Rocktron looks much more solid in side by sides.
I've never seen a real one.
#3
Anyone else?
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#4
The behringer is a solid pedal, a lot of people i know swear by it for its "bang for buck" factor. I personally use the Midi mate as i have no need for expression pedals, it controls what i need and the led display allows ease of patch changes by naming individual channels.

They are very similar controllers, but i have heard that the Behringer does take a little while to setup, im not entirely sure on this factor but its not as straight forward as the Rocktron for simplicity. So far the Rocktron hasn't let me down at all, its sturdy and not as big as most controllers, which helps with a cramped space.

...not really much else i can say, but it might be worth having a quick search over on sevenstring.org as i know of quite a few guys who have extensive experience with the Behringer.
#5
The "ease of use" factor is a major plus point for Rocktron. Even their top of the line All Access Midi controller is remarkably simple to work with.

The Behringer is not a bad unit. It's reasonably solid as long as you don't abuse it, and it has tons of features. In fact, probably more than you'll ever need with that simple of a rig. One of the things that really irritates me about the Behringer is the fact that the expression pedals are built in to the unit. Personally I prefer to keep them separate as it allows me to place the expression pedal wherever I want, and if I break it I don't screw up the entire unit.

The Rocktron should be more than sufficient for what you need, and it should be considerably easier to work with.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
Cool, I'll probably be going for the Rocktron then, I might PM you about that G-Major you have too Kendall
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#7
Quote by MatrixClaw
Cool, I'll probably be going for the Rocktron then, I might PM you about that G-Major you have too Kendall

Please do. I'm kind of needing to come off of it (I have some dental bills that I need to take care of).

And if you need any help programming the Midi Mate, I'll be glad to help.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
I have the FCB1010 to switch channel and effect on gmajor and tremoverb. I haven't gone into setting up the pedals to toggle on/off effect from the gmajor yet so I don't know how hard that will be, but for simple preset switching it does its job well. I don't like the big size of it.

Harmony Central have a thread dedicated to the gmajor and behringer setup.
#9
Alright, well now that I finally bought all the cables, I have no idea how the hell I hook this thing up and get it to work right (I bought a Behringer FCB1010 for cheap locally).

What I'm trying to do:

Switch channels on both my ADA MP-1 and Randall RM4.

Where do I plug cables and how do I program this thing, the manuals are confusing the hell out of me

Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#10
First off, get all of your signal cables situated:

- How are you switching between the RM4 and the MP-1?

- Is the GM directly in the signal path between one of the preamps and the power amp?

- If not, what type of switching system are you using?

The Midi cable routing will be really simple:

- FCB "Midi Out" ---> GM "Midi In"
- GM "Midi Thru" ---> RM4 "Midi In"
- RM4 "Midi Thru" ---> MP1 "Midi In"

To make things as simple as possible, the first thing you need to do is to set each of your three pieces of rack gear on their own channel. Put the GM on channel 1, the RM4 on channel 2, and the MP1 on channel 3 (or something else, just however you want to do it).

The MP1 is easy to program. You should be able to work your way through the manual and figure out the editing and storing process. The GM is also very easy to work with, but the learning curve is a bit steeper, figure out how to change the factory presets first and you should get the gist of it. I'm not familiar with the Midi implementation for the RM4, but I'm guessing it really can't be that hard (it's only 4 channels, right?).

You need to set up the FCB to transmit "Program Change" messages on each of the three channels that you selected for your gear. Program Change messages range from either 0-127 or from 1-128 (this should make figuring out both the GM and the MP1 very easy). If your GM is on channel 1, then transmitting PC#42 on channel 1 will recall preset number 42 on the GM. If your MP1 is on channel 3, then transmitting PC#12 on channel 3 will recall preset number 12 on the MP1. The FCB is capable of sending both messages at the same time (actually quite a good bit more that if you need it). I'll reread the manual (haven't messed with an FCB in a couple of years now) but I don't recall it being particularly difficult.

The most difficult part of Midi is the learning curve, once you figure out a few basics everything makes LOTS of sense.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM