#1
Hi UG,

I've been playing for about 2 months or so self-taught, and practicing a few hours a day, aiming to play metal/shred/instrumental rock.

So far, i have learnt parts of these songs (not to perfection but i can play them decently):

Master of Puppets (everything except the solo section at about 170 bpm)
Holy Wars (intro, somewhat slower than original tempo)
About 5 easy riffs such as iron man/enter sandman/seek and destroy
Fade to Black (intro solo)

I am attempting to learn the bohemian rhapsody/final countdown solos (should be able to get them down soon enough)

My technique is improving over time (alternate picking and bending/vibrato).I have a decent knowledge of scales from learning piano theory, but I have pretty much no chord knowledge whatsoever (realised many of the songs that I want to play use 2 finger power-chords). Due to this, I have a feeling i am learning guitar wrongly.

Any suggestions? (and perhaps new songs i could learn)
Last edited by Timothongz at Mar 5, 2009,
#3
Nah dude, you're basically just doing what I did, except way faster, and I'm pretty good 1 and a half years down the road. Although a little bit of theory here and would help, but I don't really know chords either (Never really bothered).
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#4
Absolutely doing fine. I couldn't do that after two years!
Get a chord dictionary or you could print one out but that's slow and there are advantages to having a book in front of you. The fingering in them is the ideal but I picked up the two-finger chords naturally from jamming to sixties blues stuff , Johm Mayall - Blues from Laurel Canyon specifically as he had the decency to put the key for each track on the sleeve notes. But learning that way did hold me back with other styles so remember to mix it.

Just because you want to play a particular range of styles shouldn't mean you ignore learning others. It helps later on to do improvisations and blending ideas in your own music.
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#5
Hey, chords that could be useful would be some simple (but common) open chords like the major and minor ones, sevenths, sus2's and sus'4s. Then learn barre chords - majors, minors, minor sevenths and dominant sevenths. Learn the shapes with the root on the 6th string and the 5th. Barre chords are quite common in metal music I think.
#6
Quote by Timothongz
Hi UG,

I've been playing for about 2 months or so self-taught, and practicing a few hours a day, aiming to play metal/shred/instrumental rock.

So far, i have learnt parts of these songs (not to perfection but i can play them decently):

Master of Puppets (everything except the solo section at about 170 bpm)
Holy Wars (intro, somewhat slower than original tempo)
About 5 easy riffs such as iron man/enter sandman/seek and destroy
Fade to Black (intro solo)

I am attempting to learn the bohemian rhapsody/final countdown solos (should be able to get them down soon enough)

My technique is improving over time (alternate picking and bending/vibrato).I have a decent knowledge of scales from learning piano theory, but I have pretty much no chord knowledge whatsoever (realised many of the songs that I want to play use 2 finger power-chords). Due to this, I have a feeling i am learning guitar wrongly.

Any suggestions? (and perhaps new songs i could learn)

Yes, slow down and start actually learning to play the guitar.

Being able solo is worhtless if you can't also play the song the solo comes from, and from a long term point of view you can't play decent lead guitar unless you are also a competent rhythm guitarist with a good working knowledge of chords. Also, you don't build good technique by jumping straight in with difficult stuff. You build technique from the ground up, start with really slow stuff, get really good at thart then look to progress a little from that point.

You may want to learn to play shred stuff, and that's fine as a long term goal - however there's a wealth of stuff you need to cover before you get to that point - a lot of it will seem boring or unrelated to your long term goal but it's all important and all interconnected. Just about the worst thing you can do is go racing ahead early on leaving gaping holes in your basic knoweldge because the longer you do that for the harder it is to go back and rectify those mistakes - it's much easier to to things right from the start.

Guys like Vai and Satriani didn't pick up the guitar and go "right, i am going to be a shredder so i'll learn some solos". They started at the beginning and learned pretty much everything there is to know about the instrument from there on right up until the point they're at now. Attention to detail is what's key, the great guitarists spent as much time focussing on the simple things as they did the more glamourous. complex stuff - and the most important thing is that no matter how "good" they get they will still work on those basic, core techniques day in, day out.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
Quote by greatwhiteone
id say your doing pretty damn fine for 2 months dude.

A lot better then me after 4, at least.
You don't desperately need chord knowledge but the more you know, the better I say.

Just keep it up, because I only wish I was doing that good.
#9
Whoa man you're as good as people after one year or so and you're having DOUBTS on your learning? Just keep doing what your doin' man!
#10
Quote by sureshred
Whoa man you're as good as people after one year or so and you're having DOUBTS on your learning? Just keep doing what your doin' man!

Learning a couple of solos does not make you "good", that's the whole point. Your worth and ability as a guitarist isn't solely dictated by the hardest thing you can do, it's not bloody guitar hero. What matters is your overall playing ability and knowledge, and if you've spent 2 months grinding solos but can't play simple chords then you're not really any further along thatn the guy that spent 2 months perfecting his basic rhythm chops- you've still got just as much to learn and just as far to go, all that's happened is you're missed a lot of important stuff and fooled yourself into believing you're better than you are.

Just because you can play a couple of pieces that are technically above what the average 2 month player doesn't make you better than the guy that can't solo but can play a load of "easier" songs and can also drop into a jam session with no preparation.
Actually called Mark!

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#11
It is good you started learning various riffs and are practicing hard. The one thing seemed to have missed is learning the basics around chords and strumming patterns which is often called rhythm guitar. These take a while to learn properly and give you a really good start to learning pretty much anything else on the guitar and a variety of styles. Quite a few people start with lead guitar and soon realise they are playing the guitar a bit like the terminator at high speed with no real feel or understanding of what they are really doing.

If you checkout rhythm guitar stuff you will find what you have learn so far makes alot more sense and you will be able to improve on it alot.

#12
Quote by Jesstaa
Nah dude, you're basically just doing what I did, except way faster, and I'm pretty good 1 and a half years down the road. Although a little bit of theory here and would help, but I don't really know chords either (Never really bothered).


what do you mean you don't no chords? if you don't no chords how doy uo play anything at all? how did you manage to go 1 and a half years without learning how chords work?
i'm confused as to what a chord is now, lol.

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#13
Im only a few months into my guiat journey myself and i must admit iam learning in a totally different way to you. i have a very accomplished teacher who is a session musician and although when i started out i just wanted to play things i had heard and learn the stuff what sounds really cool i am glad i stuck to exactly what was been taught to me.

from what i have heard from friends who ar good guitarists and my teacher there are lots of people who teach themselves which is all well and good but teaching yourself to play guitar and teaching yourself from a book how to play someone elses songs are totally different.

basically when i started i learnt open chords and some very basic theory such as the major scale. then moved onto barre chords and chord construction. this looks quite difficult but makes everything easier to understand such as where chords come from, how to make them extended and how a key is formed.

in between this i leanrt some simple songs and now most of the teaching i am having relates to technique. as i have said i am no expert but i am very happy with the way my teaching is going and i never feel something is being missed out.