#1
How do you suggest to learn the notes?

Should I say the note out loud as I play it?

Should I 'envision' a letter where I'm about to play? (like "draw" it on with my mind if that makes sense)

Any other ways I should do it?

I know intervals (half/whole steps), the 12 notes (A, A#, B, C, etc.)

But when I'm playing a scale, I always 'trap' myself into one position (eg; Ionian) because I'm unable to 'see' the notes. (I can move onto the other positions, but I have to think about it first, and playing in a key other then F makes me think even more)




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#2
Ionian isn't a position. Learn some theory via my sig and then force yourself to play in positions with which you are comfortable. You will eventually get this. Force yourself to play in something other than F, too. You shouldn't have to think; your fingers should know where to go when you want a sound (eventually).
#3
*slaps head* meant mode.

I've sorta been cramming some stuff, taking Piano lessons while self-teaching guitar.

I also play in other things besides F, but I have to really think about what notes I'm about to play unless I start from the root note, or the perfect 5th.




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#4
Tab out the Ionian scale for me in F.


Quote my post to see how to use code.  Use my tab template.
e----------------------
B----------------------
G----------------------
D----------------------
A----------------------
E----------------------
#5
ps: I know how to use code but do you know what font/size it is?


e---------------------------------------------------------------------------1-----
B--------------------------------------------------------------3----5------------
G-------------------------------------------2----3----5-------------------------
D----------------------------2---3----5-----------------------------------------
A--------------1---3---5--------------------------------------------------------
E--1---3---5--------------------------------------------------------------------


F (F G A Bb C D E F)




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#7

e---------------------------------------------------------------------------5---6----8--
B--------------------------------------------------------------5----6---8---------------
G-------------------------------------------5----7----9---------------------------------
D----------------------------5---7----8-------------------------------------------------
A--------------5---7---8----------------------------------------------------------------
E--5---6---8----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Anywhere else you want me to play it?




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#9
Now I'm confused.

I'm not sure if the last, or this one is the trick question.

Trick questions really start to mess me up... so...

And the mode's isn't my issue, its seeing the notes, not the frets. (If you told me to find E from my current C note, I'd have issues finding it without using the open e strings, or fretting 12 on the e strings)




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#10
you dont need that E on the 9th Fret of the G string..
you'll be doubling it with the E on the 5th fret of the B string


Edit: just read your above post.. dont mind the note names
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Mar 5, 2009,
#11
Quote by victoryaloy
you dont need that E on the 9th Fret of the G string..
you'll be doubling it with the E on the 5th fret of the B string
Quiet! This is for Sue and Invokke_Havokk!

When you say you want to find E from your C note, this is an issue of knowing intervals, probably the most important aspect of guitar playing. You learn this by playing a lot. Pay attention to what you're doing; learn what the intervals sound like. After a while (probably years), you will reach a point where your fingers simply know where to go for the sound you want, and that is a very nice skill to have.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Quiet! This is for Sue and Invokke_Havokk!

When you say you want to find E from your C note, this is an issue of knowing intervals, probably the most important aspect of guitar playing. You learn this by playing a lot. Pay attention to what you're doing; learn what the intervals sound like. After a while (probably years), you will reach a point where your fingers simply know where to go for the sound you want, and that is a very nice skill to have.


Oh, I can find it using intervals, but it does take some time.

I know if I have my C on the 1st fret of the B string I'd go up to the 5th fret of the B string.

On a Piano, I sort of have this 'vision' thing, where I can easily find any note you ask me to, I just can't seem to do that as easily on the guitar.

I've been playing guitar 1 year longer then piano. (eg; JUST started playing piano last wednesday)

EDIT:

Taylor or Tails will do. :P I have a feeling I'll be getting to know you over the months of me being here.

And trick questions are mean T_T I'm still a theory noob...I know what I know, and being asked a trick question by someone I regard as knowleadgeable just confuses me D: lol




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Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 5, 2009,
#13
You don't have to worry about switching strings on the piano. I would expect it to be harder on the guitar.

Edit: Yeah, you'll probably get to know me a bit if you're around MT. FTR, that is F major. Everything you tabbed out is F major. There's no need to bring modes into the discussion. Read the theory link in my sig and the "Modes" sticky at the top of MT for that information. What you should know about modes for now is that they're not used nearly as much as many people will lead you to believe, and, while they aren't that hard, a lot of people have learned them wrong, so you just have to forget what you thought about modes if it contradicts the information Arch, any of the mods, the stickies, or I say. Do call us out if we appear to have made a mistake, as it is easy to type G when you meant F, but that makes a significant difference in many theory discussions.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Mar 5, 2009,
#14
I generally stay in Standard tuning 99% of the time.

I just play my drop D songs in Standard unless I'm jamming with a friend or practicing it for a long period of time (eg; just learning the song)

The majority of what I play is in Standard, and I personally just love how Standard sounds. so I keep it that way (less hassle with having to tune everytime I pick up my guitar or switch songs)




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#15
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
How do you suggest to learn the notes?

Should I say the note out loud as I play it?

Should I 'envision' a letter where I'm about to play? (like "draw" it on with my mind if that makes sense)

Any other ways I should do it?

I know intervals (half/whole steps), the 12 notes (A, A#, B, C, etc.)

But when I'm playing a scale, I always 'trap' myself into one position (eg; Ionian) because I'm unable to 'see' the notes. (I can move onto the other positions, but I have to think about it first, and playing in a key other then F makes me think even more)

You want to learn notes?

When you play through a scale say the notes as you play them.

When you learn a lick learn the names of each note in that lick.

Learn intervals. Learn the names and the shapes and the sounds of each interval.

That way when you're on a C note you know exactly where the nearest E is without thinking twice simply because you know that E is a major third and you know the shape of a major third on your fretboard.

Also just learn the notes on the fretboard by writing them out. Start with one note and find it everywhere on the fretboard. Say it out loud e.g. C note - 10th fret B string - look at it, play it, sing it, say it, draw it, remember it. Just learn one note all over the fretboard. Then go on to another note when you have that first one down.

All the while learn intervals both how to name them and how to play them. Look at them, play them, sing them, say them, draw them, remember them.

Eventually as you work your way through all the notes and all the intervals the whole fretboard comes together in your mind.

Best of Luck
Si