dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#1
What I'm asking is probably beyond the scope of everyone here.

However. I'd like to rewrite the software (or firmware rather) of my Digitech RP350. I'm surprised this hasn't been done yet, honestly. But if any of you have sources out there, I'd like to know what processor it uses (they give it some generic name), what processor it's based off of or most like, and the assembly used to program it (assuming that's what is used.)

The firmware is freely available for download on Digitech's website, and can be uploaded to the pedal.

Ideas? Comments?


It's not illegal if they don't find out about it :\.
Last edited by dz_alias at Mar 5, 2009,
noisefarmer
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2008
10 IQ
#2
Quote by dz_alias
What I'm asking is probably beyond the scope of everyone here.

However. I'd like to rewrite the software (or firmware rather) of my Digitech RP350. I'm surprised this hasn't been done yet, honestly. But if any of you have sources out there, I'd like to know what processor it uses (they give it some generic name), what processor it's based off of or most like, and the assembly used to program it (assuming that's what is used.)

The firmware is freely available for download on Digitech's website, and can be uploaded to the pedal.

Ideas? Comments?


It's not illegal if they don't find out about it :\.


the reason why it's probably never been done is because what yr talking about is a lot of work for very little reward. feel free to go ahead with this and prove me wrong though.

seriously it sounds like much more trouble than its worth, trying to reverse engineer the existing software to do pretty much anything other than what it already does.

besides, line6 has the tonecore developers kit for this sort of thing.
dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#3
Quote by noisefarmer
the reason why it's probably never been done is because what yr talking about is a lot of work for very little reward. feel free to go ahead with this and prove me wrong though.

seriously it sounds like much more trouble than its worth, trying to reverse engineer the existing software to do pretty much anything other than what it already does.

besides, line6 has the tonecore developers kit for this sort of thing.

I have no Line 6 pedals. I wouldn't want to use their developers kits regardless. It wouldn't benefit me intellectually.

It's not going to be too much work. It'll give me something to do. And it'll help me learn plenty about audio engineering. Especially DSP...

EDIT: Going to bed. Will revive topic tomorrow.
Last edited by dz_alias at Mar 6, 2009,
XgamerGt04
Tab Contributor
Join date: Sep 2005
80 IQ
#4
I doubt that assembly was used to do the actual DSP programming for the pedal, chances are its in some sort of C or something other than that. Writting an assembly program to do signal processing would be a tremendously difficult task for something like that. Also, DSP has very little to do with audio engineering. It is a much larger part of computer and electrical engineering.

If you can get me some markings of off the chip, sorry if you have already addressed this, I may be able to find something that may clue you in to what it is.
dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#5

AudioDNA2 The Power Inside The Pedal.
With 400% more horse-power it's no wonder the RP350 sounds so good.
The Audio DNA2 chip is the world's most advanced audio processor, the 'engine' that gives DigiTechs new RP models so much more raw impact and subtle detail. Other manufacturers use general-purpose, off-the-shelf chips. But creating the best guitar tone requires a 100% specialised, optimised processor.
Being total audio processing fanatics their engineers set out to create a super-processor specifically designed to power a whole new generation of effects and models. The design team worked for over two years, literally redefining audio signal processing at the chip level.
Then their 'Tone-Gurus' - fresh from Production Modelling triumphs like the Jimi Hendrix Experience pedal - set to work taking advantage of all this new raw processing power. When you hear what AudioDNA2 does for the tone of the RP350 you'll agree it was all worth it.

The good majority of this is mumbo jumbo, I'm sure.
dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#6
Quote by XgamerGt04
I doubt that assembly was used to do the actual DSP programming for the pedal, chances are its in some sort of C or something other than that. Writting an assembly program to do signal processing would be a tremendously difficult task for something like that. Also, DSP has very little to do with audio engineering. It is a much larger part of computer and electrical engineering.

If you can get me some markings of off the chip, sorry if you have already addressed this, I may be able to find something that may clue you in to what it is.

Signal processing in general has well enough to do with audio engineering.

I'd rather not take my pedal apart, but I doubt I'll find reference material off the internet. So I'll go ahead with that once I get home.
XgamerGt04
Tab Contributor
Join date: Sep 2005
80 IQ
#7
Yeah I can't get you any information based upon that, i'm guessing that it is probably just a rebranded chip from somewhere else. See what I mean is that DSP does not refer just to audio. DSP refers to any sort of processing done with digital signals. In Audio Engineering you will be dealing with the recording of signals using different programs that are already there, but you will not be doing any sort of DSP programming.
dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#8
Quote by XgamerGt04
Yeah I can't get you any information based upon that, i'm guessing that it is probably just a rebranded chip from somewhere else. See what I mean is that DSP does not refer just to audio. DSP refers to any sort of processing done with digital signals. In Audio Engineering you will be dealing with the recording of signals using different programs that are already there, but you will not be doing any sort of DSP programming.

I think it is too. I can't find a single thing on the internet thought about the actual hardware used in it, nor anyone else with enough interest to want to change the firmware. Maybe I can contact DigiTech and ask them?

"Uh yeah, uh... I'm trying to reverse engineer the firmware of your RP350 pedal so I can make it better, uh... so I'd appreciate any information you could disclose to me concerning it's processor and such, thanks."

I wanna become an electrical engineer, more than anything.
XgamerGt04
Tab Contributor
Join date: Sep 2005
80 IQ
#9
Quote by dz_alias
I think it is too. I can't find a single thing on the internet thought about the actual hardware used in it, nor anyone else with enough interest to want to change the firmware. Maybe I can contact DigiTech and ask them?

"Uh yeah, uh... I'm trying to reverse engineer the firmware of your RP350 pedal so I can make it better, uh... so I'd appreciate any information you could disclose to me concerning it's processor and such, thanks."

I wanna become an electrical engineer, more than anything.


Yeah you may possibly encounter some DSP in electrical engineering, either way you'll have to take some electronics classes if you do computer engineering. I would try contacting them and saying that you want to try to learn about programming microcontrollers and see if they will tell you what kind of assembly, or what kind of processor it uses. They may be nice about it, or they may tell you no. Its worth a try.
dz_alias
Banned
Join date: Feb 2007
50 IQ
#10
Quote by XgamerGt04
Yeah you may possibly encounter some DSP in electrical engineering, either way you'll have to take some electronics classes if you do computer engineering. I would try contacting them and saying that you want to try to learn about programming microcontrollers and see if they will tell you what kind of assembly, or what kind of processor it uses. They may be nice about it, or they may tell you no. Its worth a try.

Actually, dealing with them before, they've been very nice. I just have to be very careful how I word my inquiry and it might work.
noisefarmer
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2008
10 IQ
#11
Quote by dz_alias
"Uh yeah, uh... I'm trying to reverse engineer the firmware of your RP350 pedal so I can make it better, uh... so I'd appreciate any information you could disclose to me concerning it's processor and such, thanks."


if you ask nicely you might have some luck, but i'd recommend forgetting any thought you might have of making it "better" because, and i'm being completely honest when i say this, if you had the ability to make it better you wouldn't be starting a thread asking how to do something or find out what kind of chips are in it.

and if you want to know what kind of hardware is inside it may i recommend opening it up and actually looking inside it. you'll find out much more that way.
Thomme
Vintage MIJ nut
Join date: Sep 2008
130 IQ
#12
I'd actually be really interested on how this works out. Alias, be sure to keep us tuned in. I'm thinking that if you could somehow work out a way to interface it with a computer, you could work out the programing if you're good with that type of thing... but, then again, I'm not sure how the RP350 actually works...
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
metalwarrior40
UG Resident
Join date: Jun 2007
271 IQ
#13
If you could somehow get the program onto the computer, or where i can download it, i can give a crack at it, I know several programming languages, so i might be of some use.
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