#1
Hi, i have a Lespaul made by Epiphone, but ive never ever seen another like it, not ven on the web....

i was wondering if any one knew anythink about it and could give me any history. what i already know is

Was made in 1994
was made in Korea
model number is: S5035509

is has a diffrent style as it has lots of like specs on it making it look dotted

any infomation would be help full thanks...

or if any one could tell me its value new or some think... thanks.

Tomthebomb01...

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My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#3
like there is a model they used to have that had a birdseye top but yours looks fishy to me
I'm a dude, he's a dude, she's a dude, we're all dudes HEY!
#4
i have no idea :L

its a great guitar either way i love it :P
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#5
yeah a lot of people are guitar snobs but hey the guitar looks good, and probably sounds good so why hate
I'm a dude, he's a dude, she's a dude, we're all dudes HEY!
#6
ive only had it for about a year now and ive had no problems with it, although their is a tiny fret buzz, and considering its suposivly 15 years old its a pretty dam good guitar
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#7
That guitar is actually from 1995, not 1994. The serial number pretty clearly shows this. After all it can't be from 1994 if there's no 4 in the serial number

Up until about 1997 I think it was, Epiphone made LP Standards with a plain maple cap which could have on top a veneer of, flame maple, quilt maple or birdseye maple. The birdseye tops were then dropped, then the quilt maple tops were relegated to the 'Classic' LPs only. Since then Standards have only been available with plain or flame maple tops, with quilt maple used on some special models (such as the Ultra), and Epiphone have not used birdseye maple since the original mid-90's run. Nowadays the veneer process has been stopped, and the guitars are made with actual flame maple tops when you buy a 'Plus' Standard.

For all intents and purposes, it's a regular Epiphone Les Paul Standard of the time. It just happens to have a birdseye maple veneer on top of the plain maple top instead of a flame or quilt maple veneer.

Unlike the modern Chinese-made and later Korean-made Epiphones, an Epiphone from 1995 will have a body made mostly of alder, typically with a 1/3" (later became 1/4") mahogany back piece and a mahogany veneer along the sides. The neck will be mahogany and the fretboard will be rosewood.
The pickups will be fairly generic, medium-wound Alnico V magnet humbuckers, not wax potted. These were not based on any particular design (slightly later, Epiphone pickups started being based on the designs of Gibson pickups, and Standards are now sold with an Epiphone copy of the Gibson '57 Classic and Classic Plus pickups).


That's about all the information there is on these guitars. There's no great story behind them or anything, they were just a standard model Epiphone made for a couple of years.


Value is hard to say since so few come into the second hand market. As a relatively rare piece it will have kept some value, but of course to anyone who really knows the specs and wants a full mahogany LP with the better hardware Epiphone now supply, it won't be worth much. It would have cost around £400 when it was brand new off the shelf, I would think based on current used prices for older Epiphones it would sell used for around the £300 mark, depending on what condition it's in.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
Last edited by MrFlibble at Mar 6, 2009,
#8
Woahhh!

thanks dude, huge help!



much abbliged. everytihnk i needed to know

Cheers

Tom
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#9
Tom, that's a sweet lookin' LP. I've got one of the same vintage, only flat black. I can tell you, swappin' them pups out will really help out with the tone and the tuners as well. Those MIK 90's LPs are some solid, well made instruments that can give you amazing tone. You cherish that thing and take care of it, and it'll take care of you.
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#10
Haha lol

I will man its like amasing.. a few moths ago i put a cheapo set of strings on and it sounded really tangy and horrible so i started playing my strat more. so i re strung it with Daddario strings and it brought it back to life now i just cant put it down!
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#11
any advice on new pups if im guna swap them out???
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#12
Quote by tomthebomb01
any advice on new pups if im guna swap them out???

well, I put a Seymour Duncan Jb (SH-4) in the bridge and eventually added a coil tap/splt to it and a 59 (SH-1) in the neck and it REALLY brought it to life. The stock pups can be described as such: an ice pick bridge and a blanket neck, and together: an ice pick in a blanket, right? That was what I did with it and I use a sunken neclk and the split bridge to get twangy "country" tones with some chime and depth these days. Way differant than what I thought I'd use it for, but the JB.59 can give you some killer HC/classic rock/metal tones with the right amp.
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#13
awsome, thanks dude ill probably do just that....
well when ive got the cash that is Hahahaha
My Gear

Epiphone: Les Paul - 1994 - Birdseye.
Tenson: Strat
Samick: Acoustic < On Long Term Lend.
Samick: Amp - 15w
Roland Cube 30 Amp
#15
IMHO the tuners and headstock doesn't look right. Epi should have Grovers and the head looks to squat. The Epi logo looks way to close to the tuners and it should say L.P. standard and the shape of the plate by the nut is wrong also.
You can always double check with Gibson ,but IMHO it's a fake. If you like it what the heck play it anyway.
#16
Doesn't look fake to me...and who would bother? I've got Gibson Burstbucker Pro's in my Epi LP and it sounds just right to me. Enjoy!
#17
Quote by hunter73135
IMHO the tuners and headstock doesn't look right. Epi should have Grovers and the head looks to squat. The Epi logo looks way to close to the tuners and it should say L.P. standard and the shape of the plate by the nut is wrong also.
You can always double check with Gibson ,but IMHO it's a fake. If you like it what the heck play it anyway.

why does it not occur to people that companies change things from time to time? his guitar was made in '95, epiphone didn't change to grovers until fairly recently.

there are even certain differences between the current epiphones made in different factories.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#18
Quote by Blompcube
why does it not occur to people that companies change things from time to time? his guitar was made in '95, epiphone didn't change to grovers until fairly recently.

there are even certain differences between the current epiphones made in different factories.


It most certainly IS a genuine epi, I've been round his and played it before. It could do with a pup swap but seeing how he's playing through a cube 30 it wouldn't make all that much difference.
#19
From the Guitar Dater Project - http://www.guitardaterproject.org/epiphone.aspx

Using the Serial Number : S5035509

Guitar Info
Your guitar was made at the
Samick Plant, Korea
March 1995
Production Number: 5509


Samick Guitars

Samick Guitars is one of the world’s largest stringed instrument manufacturers. Samick produces acoustic, acoustic-electric, and electric models. The company began guitar production in Korea in July 1965 and started producing guitars for Epiphone in the mid 80's. They are believed to have been the main producer of Epiphone guitars during that time. During its operation the Korean factory turned out 6,500 to 8,000 instruments a month. However by 2004 no Epiphone guitars where produced by Samick and all guitar production had been moved to their factories in Indonesia and China.