#1
I have and Ibanez RG2EX1 and anyone out there know's that they're the shiny/slick type. I tend to have smudgy fingers, so when I touch the body, I leave those marks. When I'm done, I usually just wipe the areas with a white tee shirt or something. But I'm changing strings soon, so I REALLY want to clean it, give it that shiny look again like when I first bought it.

Besides buying some expensive "amazing" cleaner, can I use items around the house to clean it, without messing up the paint job and such? I heard one guy used Windex or something... I'm not that gullible. Does it work? Any suggestions?
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#2
I just use a damp old shirt dude. Also don't wipe it after every time you use it, you'll scratch the finish.
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#3
Yes, usually any mild general purpose cleaner is good. Some cotton buds help get into all those important little places and a micro fibre cloth helps keep the finger marks down. J cloths tend to leave bits of themselves in awkward spots so a velvet finishing cloth might be handy.
While you are at it, a specialist cleaner for the fretboard is a good idea but remember to do it half at a time so you don't have all the strings off at once.
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#4
why not having all the strings off at once when cleaning? i mean sure removing one string at a time but what do you think is the problem with having all the strings off the guitar at once? the neck can take it and i think it wouldn't be wise to put such a lopsided pull on the neck...
#6
Quote by DonJulio
why not having all the strings off at once when cleaning?

Take no notice, it's perfectly acceptable to remove all the strings while cleaning.

There's an old wives tale that if you take off all the strings at once the neck will bend, twist and/or break, but so long as you don't intend to keep the strings off for any length of time then you'll fine.

The only time you may not want to remove them all at once is if you have a tremelo but there are ways around that too. You just need to block the trem block from the back so the bridge won't lift out when you remove all the strings. Or you could just do it in two halves as has been suggested.
#7
Clean it with a damp rag. then polish it with McGuires car mirror polish/wax. It will shine better than before you bought it
UG's Prodigal Son
#10
Quote by lunaticfringe93
Clean it with a damp rag. then polish it with McGuires car mirror polish/wax. It will shine better than before you bought it



I think you mean Meguiars?
#11
Quote by greggybhoy
I think you mean Meguiars?

Yeah I didn't know how to spell it so I winged it
UG's Prodigal Son
#12
Do not use heavy wax polishes on your guitar, ever! No Pledge, no car wax or anything like it. It will build up on your finish and actually traps dirt there vs cleaning.
Flannel (Kiwi shoe clothes) make excellent wipes. Dampen with warm water or even use your breath (fogging) on the finish to soften dirt and remove. Then buy a decent guitar cleaner & polish and use occassionally.

It is also very acceptable to wipe your guitar after each use with a dry flannel cloth. It won't ruin the finish and wipe your hardware as well to remove sweat which can be corrosive. It sounds as though you produce a fair amount of oils when playing (from your description of what's left behind when you touch your guitar) so cleaning is especially important for your case. Pre-washing your hands before isn't a bad idea either.
Moving on.....
#13
Quote by KenG
Do not use heavy wax polishes on your guitar, ever! No Pledge, no car wax or anything like it. It will build up on your finish and actually traps dirt there vs cleaning.
Flannel (Kiwi shoe clothes) make excellent wipes. Dampen with warm water or even use your breath (fogging) on the finish to soften dirt and remove. Then buy a decent guitar cleaner & polish and use occassionally.

It is also very acceptable to wipe your guitar after each use with a dry flannel cloth. It won't ruin the finish and wipe your hardware as well to remove sweat which can be corrosive. It sounds as though you produce a fair amount of oils when playing (from your description of what's left behind when you touch your guitar) so cleaning is especially important for your case. Pre-washing your hands before isn't a bad idea either.


My suggestion was mirror wax not car wax its just made by a car wax company. Also I said to polish it with it cleaning it should be done with a rag.
UG's Prodigal Son
#14
The less you put on, the less you'll have to take off.

Modern poly-finished guitars don't need any polish whatsoever - cleaning products only add to the various oils, greases and sticky substances. Almost any marks on a guitar can be polished off with a dry rag (microfibre cloth, chamois leather, an old sock, whatever).
#15
to be honest ,the best cleaner is also the most common , a damp rag with dishsoap on it, a damp rag with no soap and then a rag to dry it . it hasnt done me wrong in 28 yrs
#16
larrytheguitar
I watched a video from Martin guitars I know they arnt electric
But the say use a microfiber cloth a clean one if you are like me and have sweaty hand use the clean microfiber cloth then no scratches they use a car was very light one on the body and neck and use lemon oil sparingly on fretboard but use a finge wire wool on fret board after waxing as when you a soft brush on the fret board and part of the body where dust settled after cleaning as wax won't scratch but back to the subject if you was the neck it should easy to wipe hope this is helpfull loads of vids on cleaning guitars on You tube
#18
Quote by KenG
Do not use heavy wax polishes on your guitar, ever! No Pledge, no car wax or anything like it. It will build up on your finish and actually traps dirt there vs cleaning.

Here's where we disagree. I use a carnauba wax (I think Dunlop has a series 65 carnauba creme), usually just your basic Johnson's Wax in the yellow and red tin. Clean your guitar first, and then give both the finish and the hardware a good coat of wax. It does NOT build up, nor does it trap dirt. What it does do is prevent sweat from getting into microholes in the chrome (or, especially, gold) plating, where it can begin corroding the copper/nickle beneath, causing flaking of the chrome/gold plating. It doesn't leave a "waxy" coating or feeling on the guitar, etc. Remember that aside from French Polish, every coating used on guitars is actually car paint (this includes nitrocellulose paints and polyurethane, acrylics and polyester), and it does very well with a decent wax. You'll probably want to avoid silicon-based waxes, but you'll find Meguiar's Cleaner Wax an excellent choice. 

The "lemon oil" suggested here is actually something like the Olde English lemon oil furniture polish, which is mostly mineral oil (you can also use plain old mineral oil) with some minor cleaning solvents added, and it's those solvents that make it smell a bit citrus-y. Most lemon oils have no lemon at all. And you do NOT want to use real lemon oil, by the way -- that's for cooking. And if you happen across "rosewood oil," don't use that, either. That's for aromatherapy and isn't made from the same tree as your fretboard. 

What NOT to do. Do not leave your wiping t-shirt or microfiber cloth in the case with your guitar. If you've wiped down the sweat from your guitar a few times, wash it. If you leave it in the case, you'll have just accelerated the corrosion process. 
#19
Please don't post in old threads, even helpfully.
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#20
After further review, this thread has been declared useful enough to unlock despite its age.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!