#2
it's used over any minor chord really. If you wanna hear a good example of how to switch between natural/harmonic/melodic learn and analyze bouree in e minor by bach

but yeah, basically harmonic and melodic minor can be used over a normal minor chord
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#3
I somehow don't find it easy to use.
It's weird. It starts like a minor scale and all a sudden it moves into a major sequence.
#5
look at some good metal songs... usualy in the key of E. Lots of metal songs use the medolic minor in them.
#7
It's used in a minor key. Melodic minor is not a scale, it's a convention within minor tonality.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
It's used in a minor key. Melodic minor is not a scale, it's a convention within minor tonality.


Ok, and in which book does this read?
#9
it has so many uses its impossible to name them all,
it works over a dominant chord from the 4th, 5th, 7th and obviously the (flat)9th (altered scale!) degrees
and obviously over the minor(maj7) chord, and so much more,
i particularily like it as the b3 of a m7b5 chord (half dim) or the 7th of a minor chord you want to give a locrian feel to (ah sweet tension)

but the most basic use is fiddling the sharpened 7th and and 6th over a minor arpeggio, i suggest you start here, it'll really help you understand its uses
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
Last edited by Funkicker at Mar 7, 2009,
#10
Quote by January85
Ok, and in which book does this read?


Any textbook on harmony will cover the conventions of both harmonic and melodic minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
archeo is right, it's about the harmonic context, but it can also be used as a scale
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
#12
Quote by January85
Like what? I can think of many that use harmonic minor... did you mean that?


yeah
#13
Here's what you'll see commonly:

1 b7 b6 5 6 7 1

They'll descend to the 5th in natural minor, and then ascend to the root in melodic minor
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#15
Found Some of your Melodic Minor "functions" interesting Funkicker

it works over a dominant chord from the 4th, 5th, 7th and obviously the (flat)9th (altered scale!) degrees

There just the:

G B D F - C D Eb F G A B - Aeolian Dominant
G B D F - D E F G A B C# - Lydian Dominant
G B D F - Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F G - Alt.

but here..

G B D F - F G Ab Bb C D E - Phrygian Nat 6th.

Your looking at using Phrygian Nat 6th over Dominant chords? Interesting, certianly would'nt be my first inclination.


and obviously over the minor(maj7) chord, and so much more

A Melodic minors tonic chord is a Min/Maj7, so where just thinking scale/chord here

I particularily like it as the b3 of a m7b5 chord (half dim) or the 7th of a minor chord you want to give a locrian feel to (ah sweet tension)

b3 of melodic minor B D F A - D E F G A B C# D just Locrian Nat 2nd.

7 of a minor chord - just outlines Dorian b2 or Phrygian Nat 6th.

Infact the only melodic minor mode not covered is Lydian Augmented.

its an interesting way of looking at melodic minor, but I guess you can look it in that context, because theres no avoid notes in melodic minor harmony.
Last edited by Galvanise69 at Mar 8, 2009,
#16
Quote by Galvanise69
Found Some of your Melodic Minor "functions" interesting Funkicker

it works over a dominant chord from the 4th, 5th, 7th and obviously the (flat)9th (altered scale!) degrees

There just the:

G B D F - C D Eb F G A B - Aeolian Dominant
G B D F - D E F G A B C# - Lydian Dominant
G B D F - Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F G - Alt.

but here..

G B D F - F G Ab Bb C D E - Phrygian Nat 6th.

Your looking at using Phrygian Nat 6th over Dominant chords? Interesting, certianly would'nt be my first inclination.

G mixolydian scale : G A B C D E F
F mel. minor scale : F G Ab Bb C D E
the only notes that clash are Ab and Bb, now look at the alt:
G altered scale : G Ab Bb B C# D# F G
there they are so basically all notes work, no?
i know the 3rd of G isn't there, but who emphasisis both the maj3rd and m7th in a dominant chord anyway.. (7th is ofcourse already emphasised)

Quote by Galvanise69

I particularily like it as the b3 of a m7b5 chord (half dim) or the 7th of a minor chord you want to give a locrian feel to (ah sweet tension)

b3 of melodic minor B D F A - D E F G A B C# D just Locrian Nat 2nd.

7 of a minor chord - just outlines Dorian b2 or Phrygian Nat 6th.

thats not what i meant,
take a m7b5 chord, and play a melodic minor from the 3rd
so in the easiest example an Am7b5 chord - A C Eb G
with a C meldodic minor - C Eb G (A) B (so 3 5 7 (1) 9 in Am)
so a m9b5 arpeggio, all other scale notes working perfectly fine:
Amb5 - A B C D Eb F G
Cmelm- C D Eb F G A B
thus basically treating the m7b5 chord with a locrian #9 sound
(i know im just playing a locrian #9 over the chord, but the arpeggio of the 3rd is more interesting)
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
#18
That is a cool idea, tha A-7b5 w/ C Melodic, as you said, equivalent to a Min/Maj9 arpeggio.
#19
I don't know why you'd look at it as being a C-Δ arpeggio though, seeing as it is the arpeggio of the chord you're playing it over, Aø, and you stated that in your post. Is there a reason you identify it as 'playing C melodic minor from third, or playing a C-Δ arpeggio over Aø' as opposed to 'playing A locrian nat2 over Aø, or playing an Aø arpeggio over a Aø'?
Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Mar 9, 2009,
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
It's used in a minor key. Melodic minor is not a scale, it's a convention within minor tonality.
I think I love you. Can we make babies together.

You write with the minor scale. Melodic minor is just a convention you use when you're resolving or if your melody is moving towards the root. It assists resolution and melodic movement. It's not some radical new scale that only the uber musical elite uses.
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#21
Johnljones7443: Was that directed to me or funkicker?

I can identify it both ways. However your playing it, its still Locrian Nat 2nd.

But it could be seen as a Min/Maj9 arppeggio.