#1
Hello, I'd like to learn some very melodic scales that could be used in melodic death metal, or sound tasteful in general. One particular scale I like is used in the solo in the song "Carnal Forge" by Carcass, but any melodic scales named would be greatly appreciated.
#2
There isnt going to be a magic scale that sounds melodic. Most melodeath stuff I have listened to uses the minor scale. How you phrase is going to affect wether it is melodic or not.
#3
PRO TIP:
Knowing some certain scale will not automatically allow you to play like your favorite guitarist. You need to learn his phrasing, his techniques, his harmonic approach to the music. A scale is nothing more than a series of intervals.
#5
all scales are melodic if used properly
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#6
Quote by Eggmond
all scales are melodic if used properly


^This

TS: 95% of metal can be reduced to the minor scale.
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#8
Ye learn the intervals, and you will come on a point where you don't "visualize" scales, but will "hear the sounds".

If for an example an E7 chord is played, you know which note creates "x" sounds, you know which sound tenses (gives tension) how it does, and you will create lines.

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#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
^This

TS: 95% of metal can be reduced to the minor scale.

+1
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#10
Harmonic minor. If you're into melodic death metal, this is literally all you need to know.
#11
Melodic minor isn't any more melodic than any other scale, it's how thier used.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#12
Quote by KenjiBeast
Harmonic minor. If you're into melodic death metal, this is literally all you need to know.
Harmonic minor is a convention used for resolving (and occasionally when the melody is moving towards the tonic) when a composer is writing in minor tonality. Not many classical composers would write a whole melody in the harmonic minor scale. IMO, misuse of this convention sounds horrible, if you like it though go ahead.

To T/S
Keep to minor and major scales and learn to phrase your melodies. Most other complete scales are useless in western music or should only be used in analysing music, not writing music.
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#13
I agree that when learning you should stay in the major, then major and minor scales. Once you have a handle on these though, do whatever the hell you want, music is about creativity.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#14
Quote by The_Sophist
I agree that when learning you should stay in the major, then major and minor scales. Once you have a handle on these though, do whatever the hell you want, music is about creativity.
Even once you've "finished" learning, stick to major/minor scales. If you want new sounds, try using accidentals. Don't try looking for scales.
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#15
Why not? Scales are a good take-off to get you moving in the right direction.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#16
If this hasn't been said yet........

Scales themselves are not melodic, so there are no "melodic" scales. A good idea would be to learn what the term melody means, and then learn to make them utilizing the scales you know. You could also learn some of the music from the bands you like and see what you can absorb there.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 9, 2009,
#17
Quote by The_Sophist
Why not? Scales are a good take-off to get you moving in the right direction.

Well firstly, the chances that you have exhausted all the possibilities of the major and minor scales is quite small.

Secondly, for the most part in western music you will be in a major or minor key. You're not gonna be playing in the key C Gypsy or anything so by using these scales you are just using chromatics with the major or minor scale.

I do agree that these scales could help people explore more possibilities but calling it a seperate scale implies that an entire melody should be built using it, whereas you are more likely to only want to use certain chromatics in it a few times, not all the time.
#18
You choose what you play. If you want to write a whole song in phrygian, knock yourself out. Why would the major scale have any more possibilities?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#19
True modal music comes from a time when accidentals were very rare. Usually they were only used to avoid dissonance instead of create dissonance. Back then, most composers did not write with chord progressions in mind.
A modal song is this, it's a melody that reaches a peak and then resolves stepwise.

Tonal music can use accidentals (except accidetals which conflict with chord tones are rare), and will use accidental during resolution (to enhance resolution). Tonal music even makes use of chord progressions. If you wanted to write with a "phrygian" sound (note the quotation marks, it's not trully modal), you could just write a minor melody and use a b2 in the phrases you want to sound "phrygian."

Once again, explore accidentals, not scales.
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[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.